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What did you see last night in your binoculars? (Part 1)

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#1 Jeff Lee

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 05:40 PM

Me - M22 under the bright moon (Celestron StarMasters $100 20 x 80's) - still got some resolution with averted vision.

 

What did you see last night in your binoculars?


Edited by Jeff Lee, 14 July 2016 - 05:41 PM.

 

#2 Mike Lynch

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 06:42 PM

With clouds and severe thunderstorms, I took my 7 x 35 vintage binos out to look at the lightning.... Heck, with nohing higher in the sky to see, what else could I do?   :lol:


 

#3 SMark

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 06:47 PM

I went constellation hopping with my Nikon 2x54 SNE.


 

#4 JHollJr

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 07:01 PM

I can look at M 7, Ptolemy's Cluster for hours with binoculars. Hand your binoculars to someone who has never seen it and tell them to follow the scorpion's stinger to the east, and you'll get a "wow" for sure.


 

#5 Peacock

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 07:02 PM

The Jewel Box, the Moon, and Omega Centauri.

 

In the absence of the 12x50 Nikon SE, what is the best reasonably cheap 12x instrument?


 

#6 JHollJr

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 07:05 PM

I've seen the Jewel Box from Zambia.


 

#7 Thomas Marshall

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 08:04 PM

I made some light/dew shields this week out of plastic soda cups, cut off the bottoms so they fit snug over my 15x70mm Barska's, and lined them with self sticking black felt on the inside and black electrical tape on the outside, and another shield for my Brandon Master Birder 80mm. All set for my assault on M74, - one of my last 2 objects to finish off all 110 Messier objects.  Two days ago I used the 80mm and spent an hour right at the right area using SE6/8 Goto Mount, - and still did NOT make a positive ID. :lol:  Last night I studied the book diagram and went out with the 15x70mm bino's at 3AM, and spent 1/2 hour seeking it again, - and AGAIN, I came up short of a positive ID :(  The light/dew shields work great, and I had good views of M31, M33, Dbl. cluster, M101, M45, Hyades, and a good number of other things, BUT still NO M74 or M77. Next try is probably my AR102.  I have 25x100 binocs also, but have not found the right size container to make lightshields for them yet. When I do, I'll use them on these 2 objects also. Spring Valley AZ. is where I live, and it is a green zone, -but apt. lights hurt my night vision, and cause reflections with the optics, so cut into that green zone rating. I have turned the 2 worse outside lights to face less direct, and still need to move one of them a bit more. I set up behind a small tree, that helps also. Last Fall I was able to see M33 naked eye from this same spot after being out long enough to get my eyes well adapted.  It's hard for me to understand why M74 is such a hard find, - but I'm confident of getting it soon. :grin:  Thomas M


 

#8 hk112

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 08:21 PM

I saw m4, m6, m7, m11, m13, m22 and abireo, with my little canon 12X36IS3.

I could hardly find m57, as I'm in a red zone, LP is heavy, and sky was not very clear yesterday,  with some thin clouds.


 

#9 Peacock

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 08:49 PM

I'd be optimistic about finding m57 with those 12x36 Canon's considering their tiny exit pupil and surprisingly dim view.


 

#10 hk112

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 02:04 AM

Maybe it's too hard for my 12X36 given its small objectives lens.

Next time when I'm able to get to my dark site, I'd like try m57 again. 

I wish I could find it with these little binoculars. :grin:

Last summer I saw it with 10X56 mounted on a tripod, in a dark site.


 

#11 duck2k

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 02:59 AM

M22, M28, Double Double in Lyra, M56, Coathanger asterism, Izar (double star), and Jupiter (tracking the moons).  The equipment used were the Oberwerk Ultra 28x110, and the EZ Super Binoc mount.:watching:


 

#12 RussL

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 12:54 PM

I can look at M 7, Ptolemy's Cluster for hours with binoculars. Hand your binoculars to someone who has never seen it and tell them to follow the scorpion's stinger to the east, and you'll get a "wow" for sure.


Love M7, even when the view is bad and it's sparkling. Yep.
 

#13 Fivemileshigh

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 02:13 PM

I went out with my newly-built 2x54 Nikons and learned some constellations :) They excel at that!


 

#14 duck2k

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 02:12 AM

 

I can look at M 7, Ptolemy's Cluster for hours with binoculars. Hand your binoculars to someone who has never seen it and tell them to follow the scorpion's stinger to the east, and you'll get a "wow" for sure.


Love M7, even when the view is bad and it's sparkling. Yep.

 

 

I enjoyed both M7, and M6 (Butterfly Cluster) for about an hour.  I could not take my eyes off of both.:)


 

#15 KennyJ

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 03:56 AM

During a local cricket match, three deliveries officially adjudged to be "wides" by the Umpire, on the basis of having pitched on the "leg-side" of the wickets, which through Nikon 10x42 SE binoculars, from a distance of approximately 100 yards, appeared to be legitimate deliveries, pitching directly in front of leg stump.


 

#16 CAAD9

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Posted 20 July 2016 - 07:36 AM

Full moon last night, nevertheless I had a peak at Sagita (tried my best but couldn't see M71), the coat hanger and the moon!  

 

I'm loving this binocular observing thing. Whole new ball game seeing bigger objects like asterisms and big chunks of constellations.   :)

 

I don't recall ever seeing the coat hanger before. How cool is it?  :cool:


 

#17 JHollJr

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Posted 20 July 2016 - 08:10 AM

What binoculars were you using? The Coat Hanger is a piece of cake even under terribly light polluted skies. I was under dark skies a week ago and easily saw M71. I was using Canon 18x50 IS binoculars.


 

#18 CAAD9

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Posted 20 July 2016 - 08:40 AM

What binoculars were you using? The Coat Hanger is a piece of cake even under terribly light polluted skies. I was under dark skies a week ago and easily saw M71. I was using Canon 18x50 IS binoculars.

10x42L IS.  Yes coat hanger was very easy to see in the binos, I just never really looked before.  

 

During the Messier quest with the dobs, I always zeroed in on the Ms & other faint fuzzies to the detriment of observing the big picture.  That's why I'm so pleased to have taken up bino observing since getting the IS a few weeks ago.  

 

I tried non stabilised binocular observing before, but I found that mostly frustrating.  

 

I should imagine I will spot M71 in the bins once the moon goes away, possibly even in my backyard.  As for under dark skies, oh yes definitely something to look forward to. 


 

#19 CAAD9

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 06:56 AM

Southern Pleiades, the football cluster (ngc3532-PC stelarium calls it the wishing well cluster, have I got the football part wrong?),  pearl cluster (ngc3766), crux (+jewel box), southern pointers, omega Centauri.  Yeah, basically looked south.  

 

Almost full moon, plus I just plonked a fold up chair on the drive way.  We have a bright street lamp right outside, so it was always going to be just the brightest of objects.

 

but hey, even a bad session of observing is better than no observing!

 

oh yes, and eta carina, sans any nebulosity of course.  You can still the giant star eta carina in the bins, but without the nebula and all the higher magnitude stars you can see the cruciform asterism made by the brightest members.   :)

 

Yes, there is always something to see  :waytogo:


 

#20 Jeff Lee

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 11:01 AM

M12/M10 in the moonlight last night. I have an astro program on my phone and with the 3.7 FOV its almost too easy. I have a 10 degree view down to about -25 degrees and using the binocs it is so easy to check things as they hit the meridian. Was going to go for m22 but got sleepy:) But I love the quick peek for one or two objects (even though I've seen them before).


Edited by Jeff Lee, 21 July 2016 - 11:02 AM.

 

#21 CAAD9

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 07:13 AM

M13.  At first I was looking at the wrong part oh Hercules, not appreciating the size of the constellation, and thought I couldn't see it.  Ducked back inside to consult stelarium and found it very easily.  Woo hoo!


 

#22 Jay_Bird

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 02:37 PM

This is a busy time so I grab a quick look at the moon with whatever is at hand (10x42, 7x50, 7x35) and enjoy the bright ray systems and youngest crater floors, the subtle shades of the Maria, and the sliver of shadow detail at the limb in the days before and after full moon. 

 

After 5-10 minutes of bright moon watching, I try to make it back indoors without walking into the clothesline in the dark.


 

#23 CAAD9

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 02:03 AM

Still being new to the binocular game, I'm embarrassed to say how little in know the sky beyond my DSO targets.  So I think I saw the open clusters ic5765 and ic4665, then possibly the globs m12 and m10, albeit it could haven been m14 and n6366. Maybe?  

 

In between trying to figure out what the unfamiliar stuff was, I ducked back to Sagitarius for my nightly feast of M22,28,23,24,25,8,- oh you know all the obvious stuff...  I also never pass a chance to look at the comment asterism in Scorpius. Love it!

 

Since I was testing out the new(for me) zero gravity chair I leaned it all the way back and caught M4, Saturn and Mars high  up and now behind me. If I was in a darker spot I would have seen M80 as well.

 

oh so much to see.  I'm going to have to get more organised with my bino-observing.   :waytogo:

 

clear skies to all


Edited by CAAD9, 24 July 2016 - 02:05 AM.

 

#24 CAAD9

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 07:43 AM

Ok, corrections to last nights observations.

 

The pair of globular clusters I thought I had seen were in fact the compact open cluster M14 and it's fainter companion M26, both nestled in Sobieski's Shield aka the constellation Scutum. Using the binos I got to learn this small faint constellation and to the North of it, it's compatriot the White Eagle, aka Aquila. 

 

Binos are great for learning the constellations.  After the a Eagle and Shield I finally figured out where the Serpent's head is and started to appreciate Ophiucus.

 

Last night I did see the open cluster IC4665, then heading north past two bright stars one finds the OC CR350. Very subtle in the binos.  Heading back east one comes across the OC IC4756 and just below (to a southern observer) the smaller OC ngc6633.  

 

There are 3 globs in this neck of the celestial woods I could not see. I think I might drag the 10" out tomorrow and combine observations between the two instruments.  

 

The zero gravity chair is awesome! All in all a fabulous hour of observing and learning the sky in the back yard.  

 

Ciao


 

#25 Gary Z

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 07:53 AM

I have 2 sets of Garrett Optical 10 X 50s...one for me and one for my wife.  We sometimes sit in our back yard with the western sky lit up from the city lights, tall trees north, and our house blocking the east....but still, we've been able to see M7, double cluster, Pleiades Cluster, Andromeda Galaxy.  We like these as they are light weight.  

 

Thanks for this thread!  It is my first one to respond to in "Binoculars".

 

Clear Skies!

 

Gary


 


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