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What did you see last night in your binoculars? (Part 1)

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#26 Jeff Lee

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 10:49 AM

For the first time in 3 years I went to a club impromptu star party at a semi-dark site, took only the 20 x 80's and the CF 055/501 setup. M12 (some resolution), M10, M80, M22 and a bunch of others stuff including the smaller GB's in Sagittarius, m81/m82 - good ex, tension on M81, and could see mottling on M82, Jupiter in the soup with moons, Mars and Saturn, and the show stopper in the 3.7 FOV - M31 and the "kids". Have a line of folks (big scope users) looking - though I could see  at least 3 degrees of M31 - amazing. I love the 501 head - twin handles and it pans so smooth.


 

#27 Pixiedust

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 11:09 AM

What a great thread! I'm posting so I can save this for later reference. I had my binoculars out last night just before sunset  and saw Jupiter, Mars, Saturn, spica, Vega, Deneb, and another star I didn't know the name of.   I spent some successful viewing time with my telescope, mostly spent time memorized on Ring Nebula.  Finally it was dark and I went back to my binoculars. I found my favorite binocular object! The coathanger in Vulpecula.  Look up Vul 4.  I don't know why but it just delights me that I can find it you're after year. It's a favorite object to show at out reach programs and star parties too. 

 

I hope olé this thread keeps going. Fun to read.

 

Pixie


 

#28 duck2k

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 01:26 AM

Was out with my 28x110, and mount.  I saw NGC 6755, NGC 6756, Ptolemy's Cluster, and the Butterfly Cluster.

:watching:


 

#29 CAAD9

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 06:40 AM

I failed to notice n6755&6 in 10x42s.  Could be because I was observing from a suburban back yard or do you guys think it maybe the lack of magnification needed for these objects?

 

I will revisit at a darker sight later on.  It's cloudy here right now.   :(

 

Hey Duck, what is the fov visible through the beast?


 

#30 stargazer193857

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 08:02 AM

I don't use my binoculars in my college apartment complex. I'm afraid of someone thinking I'm a peeping Tom. Maybe I worry too much. Laying on my back would make me safer. I just feel safest out there with my Newtonian. The public does not even know how those work and would not  worry about them even if they did.

 

I saw M31 from a red zone. Oh, I saw the double cluster in my 6" f5. This is all cradled in my lap, not mounted yet. I stumble on the double cluster often. It just looks like a small dense star field. Then I realize, that is the double cluster.


 

#31 JHollJr

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 11:42 AM

Years ago I lived in an apartment complex near the university and one night took a telescope out in the courtyard to observe an occultation of Jupiter by the moon. Several people saw me down on the grounds and came down to see what I was doing. I explained and let people look, but almost all of the people wanted to look through windows instead.


Edited by JHollJr, 26 July 2016 - 11:42 AM.

 

#32 duck2k

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 05:52 PM

I failed to notice n6755&6 in 10x42s.  Could be because I was observing from a suburban back yard or do you guys think it maybe the lack of magnification needed for these objects?

 

I will revisit at a darker sight later on.  It's cloudy here right now.   :(

 

Hey Duck, what is the fov visible through the beast?

 

Hi there,

 

my Oberwerk Ultra 28x110 has an FOV of 2.3 degrees

The 20x110 has an FOV of 2.7 degrees

:)


 

#33 Peacock

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 07:47 PM

I saw Saturn last night through my new Vortex Razor HD 50mm spotting scope, at low power using it as a monocular (magnification was 11x). The field of view was quite restricted at only 3.8 degrees and it was strange trying to find objects with a 45 degree angle but in the end it worked reasonably well. This was from my front yard. I didn't have the time to mount it, only had time for a casual peek. Generally resolution was excellent and it went deeper than my Canon 10x42 as far as stars went. It would be interesting when I mount it whether I can separate the rings from the body of Saturn at high power on this scope which is 33x.


 

#34 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 08:01 AM

Both Venus and Mercury are visible in the twilight light around dusk so I was trying to spot them with my Swift 10x50s.  Venus was only 7 degrees above the horizon but was very bright.  Mercury was a bit tougher, in part because the western horizon is partially blocked with palm trees and telephone poles.  But soon enough I was able to spot Mercury too. Both could be seen in the same field of view though at the edges.

 

It was at that moment I realized that Jupiter, Mars and Saturn were also visible, quite a treat, the five (not counting the earth) naked eye planets all visible at one moment though not in the same field of view.

 

Jon


 

#35 hallelujah

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 11:10 AM

I have been viewing the 'coathanger' for the last couple of mornings.

 

http://earthsky.org/...r-hop-adventure

 

Sears 7x35 Discoverer Porro, Fujinon 7x50 Porro, Brunton 10x56 roof, Brunton 15x63 roof.

 

Looks best in the 15x under the present atmospheric conditions.

 

Stan


 

#36 Man in a Tub

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 06:27 PM

This year has been dreadful for observing. However, I did get to use my Fujinon 10x50 around 4 am last week. I always view to the West through an open, second floor window. There was just way too much Moon, but I did see Messier 27 (the Dumbbell Nebula), the Coathanger and Albireo. I might have seen more (e.g., carbon star T Lyr) if I had put the Fujinon on my Manfrotto monopod.

 

I have always been impressed by the observability range of Messier 27.

 

Good thread. I hope that it has a long life. Especially useful for targets you may have overlooked.


Edited by Man in a Tub, 27 July 2016 - 06:28 PM.

 

#37 CAAD9

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 07:20 PM

Binos did spotting duties for the 10" dob last night.  They were absolutly vital for navigating the dob to the globular cluster ngc6760.  It was only just visible in the dob10 as a faint smudge.  

 

Test for going dark sight this Friday :

1) will I see the 8.8mag GC in the binos?

2) will the dob resolve individual stars?

 

later on just before bed I had a quick look towards the south celestial pole from the south eastern corner window of our house.  This was more about constellation identification. Made out Musca, Triangulum Australe.  Struggled to make out Cicinus, even though I know I was looking at it!

 

all good fun.  

 

I'm loving the IS technology.  Even resting my elbows on the window ledge still produces some shake.  IS just takes that away. Woo hoo!


 

#38 SMark

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 08:54 PM

I'm at my dark sky location this week and am being further rewarded with clear skies all week long. I spent over 3 hours under the stars last night and saw more than I can probably remember. I began in the southern Milky Way and ended in the north. I hung one binocular around my neck (Nikon 2x54 SNE,) mounted two binoculars on one tripod (B&L Mk. 41 7x50 & Nikon 18x70) and got 3 completely different views of the night sky. My daughter and I also saw nearly 3 dozen meteors between the two of us, with many of those being seen in the binoculars we were using at the time. Certainly one of the best observing nights I have had in the past 5 years, and I'm hoping to have another one tonight...


 

#39 Pixiedust

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 10:05 PM

Is there a website or app with a list and chart showing where to find the best binocular objects? Headed out to dark mountain skies this weekend. My husband wants to capture Milky Way shots over a lovely mountain lake. I'm not taking any of my scopes this time. Just my binoculars and a reclining lawn chair. Would be nice if I could take a binocular viewing list or a chart with me. Thanks for all the great posts.


Edited by Pixiedust, 27 July 2016 - 11:06 PM.

 

#40 Pinac

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 12:58 AM

Is there a website or app with a list and chart showing where to find the best binocular objects? Headed out to dark mountain skies this weekend. My husband wants to capture Milky Way shots over a lovely mountain lake. I'm not taking any of my scopes this time. Just my binoculars and a reclining lawn chair. Would be nice if I could take a binocular viewing list or a chart with me. Thanks for all the great posts.

 

There are a several good books on the market for that purpose, but if you can't buy any of those before you leave, just google "binocular astronomy objects" and you get a several sites with useful hints and lists, some with printable charts.

Have a good weekend trip!

Pinac


 

#41 JHollJr

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 06:42 AM

Get Binocular Highlights: 99 Celestial Sights for Binocular Users. You can get it immediately if you use a Kindle or have a device with the Kindle app. The latter is actually better, because then you get the book in color.


 

#42 JHollJr

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 06:55 AM

July 27, 2016

I stepped out on the deck about 22:05 and noticed that the sky was very clear. I got the Canon 18x50 IS binoculars on the Manfrotto monopod and grabbed the new Starbound chair for its maiden voyage. Oriented with the chair looking east over my roof I sat and went for finding Albireo, but saw the pair of bright stars to the east and quickly found the tight pair just north in the same field. With that orientation I found M27 right away. I took a quick look at dim M71, but other than the small smudge there is no detail to see.

Then I moved back to Albireo, which is a very easy split at 18x. The high stars near or approaching zenith were almost round pinpoints with the IS engaged. I was happy with this. Then looking a Lyra I could plainly see M57, but not that it was a ring. I could see the smoky blur that was not at all starlike. The stars around it were bright and in focus with a completely different aspect than the Ring Nebula.

I spun down and was able to look at Graffias, but can't split it with the binoculars. However, I could easily see the three stars of Jabbah in the same field.

I then started at Zeta Ophiuchi at readily located both M10 and M12 and had them both in the same field of view, until I started to give more attention to M12. Stars in the central portion were right on the border of being resolved, but I can't say that I actually resolved any. I could see that they were there and right on limit of being resolved.

Following Shaula and Lesath, M7 was beautiful as always. The stars snapped into focus with the IS. M6 showed several stars, but I'm not patient enough to try to count them. Someday, I should actually start to do that and take more time with individual objects.

Standing, I located M8, the Lagoon, NGC 6514, the Trifid, and M21. Then found M24, the Sagittarius star cloud. I finished off that part of the sky looking at M11, the Wild Duck. The bright stars of this open cluster were like diamonds in the mist of the rest of the cluster.

By this time the Mosquitos had found me, and since I was wearing gym shorts, they bit the **** out of my legs to point that I decided the hang it up.

22:40. I put the equipment away. After I finished putting the binoculars away, I went back out on the deck and just looked with my naked eyes. In the Little Dipper I could see Kochab, Pherkad, Alina al Farkadain, Urodelus (mag. 4.21) and Polaris. I could not see Anwar al Fakadain al Yildun.

The Milky Way from Sagittarius up through Cygnus and into Cepheus was very plain with the star clouds in Sagittarius and Scutum being clearly visible. Stars in Vulpecula down to a magnitude 5 could be glimpsed. All in all, not a bad half hour of viewing.


Edited by JHollJr, 28 July 2016 - 06:59 AM.

 

#43 Mad Matt

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 07:01 AM

M4,M8, M20 and a buck of other stuff in the area with the Docter Aspectem under 6.4 mag skies in Croatia. WOW! Pretty much sums it up!
 

#44 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 07:09 AM

Is there a website or app with a list and chart showing where to find the best binocular objects? Headed out to dark mountain skies this weekend. My husband wants to capture Milky Way shots over a lovely mountain lake. I'm not taking any of my scopes this time. Just my binoculars and a reclining lawn chair. Would be nice if I could take a binocular viewing list or a chart with me. Thanks for all the great posts.

 

I would just start slowly scanning the summer Milky Way.. 

 

Jon


 

#45 Jay_Bird

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 12:24 PM

The free download monthly charts from www.skymaps.com are available for northern & southern hemisphere and equatorial locations. 

 

 

They are great to have a few printed in case anyone wants handouts at outreach.  

 

For this topic, they always organize good objects near the evening meridian as naked eye, binocular and telescopic targets.  You may detect many of the telescopic targets  with binoculars so don't rule them off a try.

 

 

Going back a few posts to JHollJr - M6, M7 and 'the eyes' at the stinger of Scorpius are a favorite area for me with binoculars.  Another favorite is Omicron Cygni not far from Deneb.


Edited by Jay_Bird, 28 July 2016 - 12:24 PM.

 

#46 CAAD9

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 05:05 PM

 

I failed to notice n6755&6 in 10x42s.  Could be because I was observing from a suburban back yard or do you guys think it maybe the lack of magnification needed for these objects?

 

I will revisit at a darker sight later on.  It's cloudy here right now.   :(

 

Hey Duck, what is the fov visible through the beast?

 

Hi there,

 

my Oberwerk Ultra 28x110 has an FOV of 2.3 degrees

The 20x110 has an FOV of 2.7 degrees

:)

 

Thanks Duck.

 

i didn't get out last night.  Logged in to work too long.  Never mind, have to pay the bills.

 

Going to a darker sight tonight - woo hoo!  I think I'll set up my 14" goto dob for the others, then hop into my zero g seat with the binos and have a feast! 


 

#47 bumm

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 09:52 PM

Lately, I've gotten into the 2x54 thing, as have others in this group.  (See the "Home built..." thread.)  At first, I figured I'd quickly tire of the 2x54's after a few first looks.  I was wrong.  A couple nights ago, I went out with my rather bizarrely designed 2x54's, with their 27 degree FOV, and my 20x80's.  Two COMPLETELY different windows on the night sky, both with their strong points.  The 20x80's are best with individual DSO's, while the 2x54's are best with constellations and wide starfields.  Occasionally, the 20x80's can take of bit of scanning to find an object, but once found, a DSO begins to take on it's familiar telescopic appearance.  One never has to lower the 2x54's from his eyes...  The view is a "living star chart," and you can just follow them all around the sky.  To list individual DSO's viewed would read like a phone book, but aside from simply scanning the Milky Way with both, the high point of the night was the view to the northeast in the area of Andromeda and Perseus...  With the 20x80's both the Andromeda Galaxy and the Double Cluster put on a fine show.  In the 2x54's, both objects were easily visible in the same FOV, along with Al Sufi's fishes...  two tadpoley shaped asterisms hanging down with their tails starting at the Double Cluster and the Andromeda Galaxy, and extending down to respectively touch and pass through the Andromeda constellation.  (But it DID take a few degrees of wiggle to finish catching the entire "Andromeda Fish.")

     I love this stuff.  I'd hate to choose one of these binoculars over the other.  :)

                                                                                                            Marty


 

#48 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 05:32 AM

Just to add to Marty's observations, the night before last, my wife an I were out looking at the 5 planets simultaneously visible. Venus was easy naked eye but Mercury was lost in the twilight and while my wife could see it,  I couldn't see it naked eye, 

 

However with the cyclops version of 2x54s Mercury was very easy to see, chalk one up for the 2x scopes and binos.

 

To further Marty's observations, typically binoculars take me to a different world than I see naked eye. Even 7x 35s show so much more while greatly reducing the field of view that its just a very different view.  But a magnification of 2X is a very similar experience to naked eye viewing, I would call it "enhanced" naked eye viewing.

 

Jon


 

#49 hk112

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 07:22 AM

Last night, I was on a ship about 10 miles from the coast.

Mliky Way was so spectacular, M7 was easily seen by naked eyes, so were M8 and M22.  The Sagittarius star cloud was also very empressive.

I took my 8X32 CONQUEST HD and watched M4, M6, M7, M22, M80, M8, M20, M11, M18, M16, M17, M27, coat hanger, M13, M28, M25, M55, M54, M39, mothra cluster, summer beehive, M56, M92, M3, M5, M10, M12 and some NGCs and ICs. I could frame M10 and M12 in the same field, it was really funny.

Laterly I also saw M31 with M110. M33 was fainter than M31. The  great double clusters were easily made out with naked eyes and were beautiful in the binoculars. 

M15 took me a lot more efforts to find than M2.

Then I went back to my room cause looking at zenith through handy  binorculars was really hard for my neck. LOL

I regretted not having taken my 12X36IS, The ship was crusing and I couldn't hand the 8X32 steadily.


 

#50 bumm

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 07:40 AM

Last night, I was on a ship about 10 miles from the coast.

Mliky Way was so spectacular, M7 was easily seen by naked eyes, so were M8 and M22.  The Sagittarius star cloud was also very empressive.

I took my 8X32 CONQUEST HD and watched M4, M6, M7, M22, M80, M8, M20, M11, M18, M16, M17, M27, coat hanger, M13, M28, M25, M55, M54, M39, mothra cluster, summer beehive, M56, M92, M3, M5, M10, M12 and some NGCs and ICs. I could frame M10 and M12 in the same field, it was really funny.

Laterly I also saw M31 with M110. M33 was fainter than M31. The  great double clusters were easily made out with naked eyes and were beautiful in the binoculars. 

M15 took me a lot more efforts to find than M2.

Then I went back to my room cause looking at zenith through handy  binorculars was really hard for my neck. LOL

I regretted not having taken my 12X36IS, The ship was crusing and I couldn't hand the 8X32 steadily.

Especially this time of year, you can really line up a collection of DSO's.  :)

                                                                                             Marty


 


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