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What did you see last night in your binoculars? (Part 1)

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#51 Jeff Lee

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 11:13 AM

So continuing my Starmaster experiment, I used some super velcro (hard plastic and very strong glue backup by some super glue on the top of the adjuster) to attach an inexpensive red dot finder. Found m92 in about 5 seconds, it and 13 are so high up I need something to reference where  I was. Spent a lot of time with M13  and M92. I must admit these are making me think about a good pair of 20 x 80's. M92 is often over looked but one of my fav's.


 

#52 CAAD9

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 07:30 PM

Went out of town last night so the NELM was so much better.  I got lost in the sky, albeit happily so.

 

What I can report is that of some of the items I looked for but could not find in binos in the burbs like M71 is Sagitta I could see last night.  

 

Kept swapping between the  14" dob, binos and the old mk1 eyeball.  The delta Aquarid meteor showed was on last night and the best views really were with the naked eye!  We saw some real beaut fireballs last night. 


 

#53 hk112

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 10:05 PM

 

Last night, I was on a ship about 10 miles from the coast.

Mliky Way was so spectacular, M7 was easily seen by naked eyes, so were M8 and M22.  The Sagittarius star cloud was also very empressive.

I took my 8X32 CONQUEST HD and watched M4, M6, M7, M22, M80, M8, M20, M11, M18, M16, M17, M27, coat hanger, M13, M28, M25, M55, M54, M39, mothra cluster, summer beehive, M56, M92, M3, M5, M10, M12 and some NGCs and ICs. I could frame M10 and M12 in the same field, it was really funny.

Laterly I also saw M31 with M110. M33 was fainter than M31. The  great double clusters were easily made out with naked eyes and were beautiful in the binoculars. 

M15 took me a lot more efforts to find than M2.

Then I went back to my room cause looking at zenith through handy  binorculars was really hard for my neck. LOL

I regretted not having taken my 12X36IS, The ship was crusing and I couldn't hand the 8X32 steadily.

Especially this time of year, you can really line up a collection of DSO's.  :)

                                                                                             Marty

 

Thanks Marty. I really love summer starry night.

With so many DSOs, it could be the heaven when one gets to a dark site With a pair of binoculars!

:grin:


 

#54 duck2k

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Posted 31 July 2016 - 12:36 AM

Re-visited Ptolemy's Cluster, and Butterfly Cluster. Lagoon Nebula and Trifid (both just hazy patches, but still neat to view).  I finished up my session with IC 4756, and Coathanger Asterism.  Storm clouds moved in and cut the observing short.  Enjoyed what I did see.:)


 

#55 oldmanrick

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Posted 31 July 2016 - 11:32 PM

Through my 100mm Lunt APO's, (at 117X), watched Jupiter set behind the ridge to the west, with only 3 moons visible last night.  Also visited Mars and nearby Saturn.

 

About the time it was getting good and dark, I spotted the ISS coming over, on a heading that would bring it almost directly overhead.  This time, although not looking for it or expecting to see it, I saw it coming in time to get my binoculars aimed for an intercept, and my observing chair adjusted before it was past.  I was able to track it for a couple of minutes at 117X, using my gear drive tripod head.  It was so bright that making out detail was impossible, but was able to easily see the large solar panel arrays on each side.

 

I saw many other orbiting objects, mostly with the bare eye, but at least three times, (not counting the ISS), while looking at planets or scanning the milky way, I saw bright objects cross my field of view.  One was quite bright and large, though only a fraction of the ISS.  The others were much smaller, probably not visible to the naked eye.

 

I saw one other object flash across the field of view in the binoculars at 44X.  It was traveling much faster than a satellite normally does, and was not nearly so bright.  It seemed to have just a kind of dull glow, and probably spent less than a second crossing near the center of the 1.86 degree field of view at 44X.  Earlier this year I saw another very similar object cross the field of view.  I don't know for sure what they are, but are most likely some kind of "space pebble", just starting to light up entering the atmosphere.

 

I'm always amazed at how many things I see moving through the field of view when observing like last night.  There must be an awful lot of "stuff" orbiting around up there!

 

Has anyone else noticed this?


 

#56 bumm

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 07:44 AM

Oldmanrick was saying

I'm always amazed at how many things I see moving through the field of view when observing like last night.  There must be an awful lot of "stuff" orbiting around up there!

Has anyone else noticed this?

 

This got me to thinking a bit.  While it isn't unusual to see satellites crossing the FOV, I usually don't.  I haven't thought about it much, but I figure I'm usually out more like midnight, when most satellites are in the earth's shadow. 

On a related note, I've never gone out to look for either the ISS or the Space Shuttle, but remembering the excitement of the dawn of the space age got me to seek out everything still in orbit from the 1950's.  A short list.  :)  The oldest thing still up there is Vanguard 1.

                                                                                                              Marty


 

#57 CAAD9

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 08:03 AM

Not last night, but in fact just finished an hour or so with the 10x42ISs (iss - get it?) oh dear, I'm becoming a binocular nerd, with lame binocular nerd jokes...

 

anywho... I put the zero g chair on the south side of the house and focused on southern constellations, both naked eye and binos.  Ultimate aim is to be able to identify Polaris Australis.  Not quite there yet.  But I have come to grips with Hydrus, Pavo, Ara and the Eastern half of Octans.  

 

Special bonus, great time of year here in Oz as all 3 of the brightest Globs are in view, and what a contrast they are too:

Omega Centauri - the absolute King of the Globs, so much bigger than any other.

47 Tuc - very bright, easy to find once you know the southern tip of Hydrus.

Ngc6752 - in Pavo, clearly distinguishable by the companion foreground 8 mag star. Much smaller in binos than the other two. Interesting that in binos the 8 mag star is quite separate from Ngc6752. In the dob at a dark site the foreground star is almost overwhelmed by the glob.

 

awesome way to relax at the end of the day!  

 

Cheers all.


 

#58 CAAD9

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 08:09 AM

In response to Rick (post#55) -yes absolutely there is so much stuff up there.  Whenever I have a 2-3 hour session with a dob, even when sharing with others I always spot multiple shooting stars through the night.  Always! 

 

The thing to keep in mind is that with the dob, the fov is narrow ( by bino standards at least) so to see that many bits of dust and stuff enter the atmosphere is mind boggling!

 

great post Rick.

 

cheers


 

#59 JHollJr

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 08:35 AM

When I was at a dark sky site in West Virginia a couple of weeks ago enjoying exploring the Milky Way with binoculars, my wife kept exclaiming there is a satellite, there is a satellite. Worse than a broken record.


 

#60 Jeff Lee

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 12:24 PM

Not quite astronomical, but using my 10 x 50's got to watch a barred owl in my backyard for a while.

 

I notice they are a little easier to use than the 20 x 80's:)


 

#61 CAAD9

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 02:41 PM

Well, I'm just loving the IS canons! 

 

So this morning since the roads are too wet for cycling I grabbed 10 minutes of observing while more clouds were rolling in.  It rained overnight, so the sky had that crisp clean look to it.  

 

Anyhow, first up the Pleiades looking almost straight north over the garden hedge. I didn't really get a good look as the clouds were rolling in from the north west.

 

Hyades, a cluster totally lost in a dob, but so much to explore in the binos. Anyway more clouds rolling in, so on to Orion.  

 

Gees, this never fails to impress : the sword all in one fov, fantastic!  But something I never noticed before about the belt : there is an asterism of stars that resembles the outline of an octopus centered around the central star. The head of the Octopus makes a large circle around Alnilam and then the tentacles go underneath and sort of underline the whole width of the belt.  Upside down for Northern observers I suppose.  :)  Now that I know what to look for I can even see it in Stellarium.

 

Then I walked around to the south facing side of the garden, the house always gets in the way, as the False Cross is now rising in the South East.  Straight above it I saw C96 (ngc2516) another open cluster.  Then up higher and Canopus, then across to Sirius. M41 is within the same FoV as Sirius!  Fantastic!

 

So, what's so good about the IS bins?  

1) open clusters and asterisms lost in a dob are now available - there is just a whole new layer of observation to explore.

2) the IS allows zero prep observing.  Clouds were coming in fast, but the sky was so clear it demanded a look.  No worries with the steady view I didn't even bother with a chair (no time).  I have looked at Orion in 10x50s many times over 30 years, but never noticed my Octopus asterism before! 

 

What a way to start the day!

 

cheers all.  


 

#62 tccz

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 11:08 PM

In the center of manhattan, NYC, I was able to see the core of M31 by my lunt 16x70. Also, I saw a hint of cloud of M15, for the first time, by the same bino and then confirmed it by using my C90. 

 

I am really excited that I can add one more messier object in my city observing list! The lunt 16x70 is really an amazing astrobino. The leap from fuji 10x50 to lunt is significant and this make me wondering what would be if I am using a 25x100 ... gotta save more money ...


Edited by tccz, 02 August 2016 - 11:09 PM.

 

#63 Allardk

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 06:22 AM

CAAD9, you discovered the benefits of binoculars. Depending type (IS etcetera) zero to minimum setup time. Wide views and above all...two eyes with all its benefits.

 

I looked last night with the 10x50 and APM 100-45. Not much longer than 30 minutes. Setup of the APM is a few minutes.

Managed to resolve M22. Looked a long time at the Lagoon nebula. Was impressed again by the Eagle nebula and the dense cluster within, NGC 6611.


 

#64 John_G

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 11:31 AM

Scanning the skies with 10x50 Fujis and seeing a lot but I believe the very last and one I looked at last night was Caroline's Rose.


 

#65 tccz

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 12:09 PM

Haha John,

 

I have the same M101 as personal picture. 

 

Scanning the skies with 10x50 Fujis and seeing a lot but I believe the very last and one I looked at last night was Caroline's Rose.


 

#66 CAAD9

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 05:47 PM

It was a windy night last night here in Brissie, and by our standards it was very cold.  (Please don't scoff if you find yourself in Europe or North America.  :) )   So an added benefit of binos in uncomfortable conditions: I put one blanket down on the zero g chair, another to wrap around me, not to mention the multiple layers on me.  But anyway, I was able to hide from the wind and the cold.  Can't do that when dancing with a dob!

 

So the observing: I'm really getting into the Open Clusters, most of which I normally ignore with the dobs - so it has opened a new window for me.  :waytogo:  Focused on learning a patch of sky between the southern pointers and the comet asterism in Scorpius.  

 

Last night in particular the OCs NGC 6025, 6067, 6087 and 6087s near neighbour Collinder 299.  The 3 ngc's are a nice contrast to Cr299. A novice like me would not have picked the Cr cluster without being told that it's there on a map.  The NGCs however are all clear and easy to spot.  All about 5-5.5 magnitude and 10-15" angular diameter.  The Collinder is bigger, more diffuse.  They all fit in the one FoV in the 10x42s. Loved it!

 

 Further into Norma Ngc 6134 and 6167 were spied as I panned the binos.  In my LP backyard, averted vision gave best results for them.

 

clear skies all


 

#67 CAAD9

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 05:53 PM

Oh one other thing, I sent myself on a wild goose chase last night thinking I may have seen an occultation , or better yet a supernova!

 

what happened was that as I panned ngc6087 into the centre of the binos coming down from SCO one of the stars near the centre of the fov just popped into view, where a moment prior it had not been there....

 

Well, I got all excited, alas it was just the star K Norma and something high up must have blocked in momentarily.  There were no expected asteroid occultations and it certainly wasn't a supernova, that star is clearly marked on the charts.

 

has this ever happened to any of you?


 

#68 CAAD9

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 06:04 PM

CAAD9, you discovered the benefits of binoculars. Depending type (IS etcetera) zero to minimum setup time. Wide views and above all...two eyes with all its benefits.

 

I looked last night with the 10x50 and APM 100-45. Not much longer than 30 minutes. Setup of the APM is a few minutes.

Managed to resolve M22. Looked a long time at the Lagoon nebula. Was impressed again by the Eagle nebula and the dense cluster within, NGC 6611.

All true, but once the setup time extends to 5 minutes then it's the 10" dob.  I can move it one handed in the space of 45 seconds to either one of my garden's dark spots with a cheap hand cart, EP case in the other hand.  It's walking back to the garage bringing out the adjustable chair, plonking in the EP, bit of collimation etc that takes the other 4:15. :)

 

 It's the instantaneous nature of the IS that wows me, plus the incredible optics and the wide field - you are all probably sick of hearing me carry on about the IS....

 

Sorry.   

 

P.s. This is probably a sad reflection on me that I can't be bothered with that extra 4:15 seconds to include the dob.  


Edited by CAAD9, 03 August 2016 - 06:06 PM.

 

#69 Mad Matt

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 02:11 AM

Oh one other thing, I sent myself on a wild goose chase last night thinking I may have seen an occultation , or better yet a supernova!

what happened was that as I panned ngc6087 into the centre of the binos coming down from SCO one of the stars near the centre of the fov just popped into view, where a moment prior it had not been there....

Well, I got all excited, alas it was just the star K Norma and something high up must have blocked in momentarily. There were no expected asteroid occultations and it certainly wasn't a supernova, that star is clearly marked on the charts.

has this ever happened to any of you?


Yes, several times. I think it has to do with the blind spot on my eye. In my case I believe my brain simply did not register the star until it moved out of the blind spot.
 

#70 CAAD9

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 05:08 AM

 

Oh one other thing, I sent myself on a wild goose chase last night thinking I may have seen an occultation , or better yet a supernova!

what happened was that as I panned ngc6087 into the centre of the binos coming down from SCO one of the stars near the centre of the fov just popped into view, where a moment prior it had not been there....

Well, I got all excited, alas it was just the star K Norma and something high up must have blocked in momentarily. There were no expected asteroid occultations and it certainly wasn't a supernova, that star is clearly marked on the charts.

has this ever happened to any of you?


Yes, several times. I think it has to do with the blind spot on my eye. In my case I believe my brain simply did not register the star until it moved out of the blind spot.

 

Thanks for responding.  Gees, I hope it isn't that.  Albeit, I know I have my first floater  :(


 

#71 Mark9473

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 06:19 AM

 

 

Oh one other thing, I sent myself on a wild goose chase last night thinking I may have seen an occultation , or better yet a supernova!

what happened was that as I panned ngc6087 into the centre of the binos coming down from SCO one of the stars near the centre of the fov just popped into view, where a moment prior it had not been there....

Well, I got all excited, alas it was just the star K Norma and something high up must have blocked in momentarily. There were no expected asteroid occultations and it certainly wasn't a supernova, that star is clearly marked on the charts.

has this ever happened to any of you?


Yes, several times. I think it has to do with the blind spot on my eye. In my case I believe my brain simply did not register the star until it moved out of the blind spot.

 

Thanks for responding.  Gees, I hope it isn't that.  Albeit, I know I have my first floater  :(

 

 

I think you misunderstood. Everybody has a blind spot in their eye.

The brain usually compensates nicely for this, but occasionally on point sources (stars) it will briefly fail.


 

#72 nevy

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 07:04 AM

I don't think I'm allowed to say what I saw ,I'll be taking another peek tonight  :blush:  :blush:  :blush: .


 

#73 CAAD9

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 05:10 AM

#71 - I see, thanks Mark.

 

#72 - oh dear, this explains why the sight of telescopes and binoculars makes some people jumpy....


 

#74 JHollJr

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 06:35 AM

August 4, 2016

20:18. Found Venus easily with the Canon 18x50 IS     just above the evening clouds of sunset at azimuth 280 and about 8 degrees above the horizon. .

20:26. The crescent moon is visible with the naked eye.  Mercury can be seen through the binoculars 1 degree northwest of the moon and well within the same field of view. The moon is a naked eye thin crescent. The Mosquitos have hit.
 
20:35. Venus is very bright in the binoculars shining through a spray of clouds.

20:40. Venus now easily visible with the naked eye 4 degrees above the horizon at azimuth 283.

20:43. Jupiter is out as are Mars and Saturn. Now I've seen the five planets.

20:53. Venus is still visible. 21:01 Mercury naked eye. Mercury now behind the trees.

Went out with the binoculars again at 21:30. The usual suspects.

22:13. M56 for the first time. Quite dim globular cluster.


 

#75 John_G

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 07:08 AM

Hand held scanning with 15x70s so saw a lot. A nice dark location so spent some time in Aql and Scu looking at dark nebula. The last 2 targets for the night where M52 and NGC 457.


Edited by John_G, 05 August 2016 - 07:18 AM.

 


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