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Planetariums for Outreach (Am I nuts or what?)

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#26 jtsenghas

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 10:09 PM

You two are not alone. One of my sweepstakes/engineering fantasies is to be indepepedently wealthy and to design and build a trailer that folds out to make a sizeable planetarium with a smooth interior hemispherical dome housing one of those classic projectors.  I could travel from elementary school to elementary school towing it with a big pickup truck and put on free star shows in their parking lots for science classes. I want others to have that moment of comprehension that I mentioned earlier, especially in poorer or more rural areas where such shows aren't available.


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#27 nitegeezer

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 01:12 AM

I would be more then happy to post "more details and images", I'm just not sure where the moderators would want me to put it.  It's not a topic that fits in with those listed.  Any moderator out there that could direct me on this?

This is about outreach, and you have been asked for details, which in my mind makes this up to you if you want to share more.  I certainly won't complain.  I am also curious about your dome, is it one of the conduit/cloth domes or is it a solid structure?


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#28 Ron Walker

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 01:56 AM

I thought for a long time about some kind of air inflatable dome and portable projector to take around to schools and libraries but that is another part of my story.  I will take all of you to the beginning of my odyssey if you like as this final project is actually my fourth attempt at building a working planetarium.  Not being independently wealthy this project is wrought with compromise.  The dome alone took a little over two years to build as I didn't have the budget to hire a building crew.  For someone not fond of heights, there were days on a twenty foot scaffold when I seriously questioned my sanity.  But with the solid support of family and a few dedicated friends it was finished.

 

 

One example of some of the work required is the control console.  One of the reasons I was able go get these projectors was the condition of much of the electronics.  Much of it wasn't worth the effort to repair.  Since these machines are basically just a bunch of flashlights with some motors to drive them around, I knew that building new control electronics would be fairly simple.  Actually I basically just saved the actual main panel because it looked kind of "cool" and then added extra as needed.

 

This picture is taken with a fish-eye lens to get it all in.  It is built on an old computer stand that was ready to be junked.  The curved appearance is because of the lens used.

 

fish eye control panel.jpg

 

Beginning with the panel on the far left, the top part contains the audio amplifiers for the various speakers abound the base of the dome.  Just below that are a selection of push button switches to control 24 individual constellation outline projectors to augment the original six set up on the machine.  This allows me to have 30 available at any time in proper alignment.  This is the last project that I have completed to date.  There are also controls here for eclipse projectors for both the Sun and Moon.  The next panel to the left forward contains three sections.  The top (black) contains the controls for a projection orrery.  There are also controls for single meteor as well as meteor storms, etc..  The next unit down (green) contains the main power switch as well as current and voltage readouts.  There are also controls for light pollution, geocentric earth, and nova.  Also space for further expansion of auxiliary projectors.  The lower panel (tan) contains the motion drive motor controls for diurnal, annual, processional, and latitude.

 

Moving to the front is the original control unit that I included in the rebuild.  This panel contains readouts that show the date and time as well as positions that the planetarium is set for.  Many of the sliders below have been re-purposed and are now all functional.  The final panel on the right contains controls for room illumination both day and moon night as well as the Sun, satellites, the ISS, a rather ominous asteroid and other devices.  All in all, if laid end to end, over a mile of wire connects the control unit and the main planetarium projector.  Between the front and right side panels is an arrow pointer which projects a true arrow and not just a laser dot which many newer planetariums use.

 

As you can see I can become rather detailed and wordy.  If you want more I will continue.


Edited by Ron Walker, 09 August 2016 - 02:06 AM.

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#29 Ron Walker

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 02:05 AM

Thank you Chuck.  Just wanted to make sure I was in the proper place.

 

To answer your question, the dome is a permanent geodesic structure built with a standard 2X4 frame.  I wanted something that would last.

 

But the story begins a long time ago when I was a wee lad growing up in Chicago.

 

More to come. 



#30 jtsenghas

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 06:49 AM

...As you can see I can become rather detailed and wordy.  If you want more I will continue.

 

PLEASE continue with as many details and words as you can! My hat is off to you, sir. :bow:

 

Have you upgraded where modern technology makes more sense--for example using LED's in place of any incandescent bulbs or stepper motors in place of any complex gear trains? I would love to equip some of those wonderful, well made older planetarium optics with logical modern day components.


Edited by jtsenghas, 09 August 2016 - 06:55 AM.

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#31 Ron Walker

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 12:59 PM

Both yes and no to upgrades.  Basically it all depends on complexity and cost as well as functionality.  The original drive motors are simple DC devices. A simple Variac driving a bridge rectifier and then a reversing switch is all that is needed for operation.  Also simple DC motors provide ample torque at even the slowest speeds.  With this simple setup I can run a day off in as little as two minutes to as long as an hour.  Replacing "complex gear trains" would be counterproductive (for me at least) as the computer controls would be beyond me both program wise and dollar wise (plus computers always break down).  Why complicate the simple.  The projector was originally placed in service in 1975 shows absolutely no ware on any of the gears.  It is "built like a tank" as they say.  Besides, the gearing is part of the charm and beauty of the technology and it works.  Also I have found through old printed materials that the gearing is so accurate that no projected image is off more then one degree on the dome after 5,000 planetarium years.  Viewers have been so intrigued that I have given two shows on exactly how the planetarium projector does what it does.

 

Now lamps are a different story.  The cost of replacements makes one understand the need for government support.  Also many of the lamps are no longer available.  LED's are certainly the answer in this case.  I have found a number of LED's made for the auto industry that will fit the existing sockets and only require different power supplies to work.  All of the planet projectors are now converted over as well as the Moon which originally looked kind of brown and dingy and now looks round and slightly blue as in nature.  I also replaced the bright star projector lamps for Sirius and Canopus with much brighter LED's giving them the brightness they deserve.

 

But I am getting ahead of myself.  I have mentioned my interest in these fine machines as a youngster growing up in Chicago.  So interested in fact that I made three attempts at building one while living there.  I moved from Chicago to Arizona in 1971 and with work and family commitments my thoughts of planetarium building faded away.  Fast forward some forty years to me cleaning out some of the accumulated clutter and finding an unopened box moved so long ago.  Low and behold I find the last attempt from the 60's of building a projector.  The virus of planetariumitus again blossoms forth.  Little did I know how far it would take me. 

 

I feel I should always post one picture with every essay so here is "the rats nest" behind one of the control boards.

 

web back of switch panel.jpg


Edited by Ron Walker, 09 August 2016 - 01:01 PM.

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#32 Ron Walker

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 10:25 PM

Anyone remember the Spitz Jr. planetarium?  Spitz loved planetariums and thought they were the greatest teaching (outreach) tool that ever existed.  The only problem was the only one available was the Zeiss II.  A two ton, twelve foot long, complex and expensive beast of a machine designed to work under a 68 foot diameter dome.

 

 

The original Adler Zeiss II, which served from 1930 to 1970, is the machine that got me interested in planetariums in the first place.  You can imagine the impression it made on me.

 

Spitz thought that a simpler and more expensive machine could be built and indeed came out with a $500 pin hole projector for smaller venues.  That price soon went up into the low thousands.  He was so interested in the educational value of the planetarium that he did a deal with a company to make a home version of his larger machine and he wrote a small pamphlet introducing the owner to the basic constellations.  The small machine, using basic pin hole projection techniques, projected some 400 stars out onto the walls of a room and sold for $15 at the time.  Now in modern inflationary dollars this would run about $150 today.  Though no longer manufactured, it is still one of the best “toy” projectors out there and can be found from time to time on e-bay for under $100.

 

Spitz Jr.jpeg

 

$15 was an unbelievable sum to a youth in the 50’s and spending that amount on any one object was unthinkable to depression era parents, but the collected earnings and birthday gifts of several years made the unthinkable a reality.  I actually had very little idea as to how planetariums worked back then and the idea of seeing 400 stars (living in Chicago, 50 stars was an unbelievably clear night) was beyond belief.

It was great but I wanted more.  I wanted motor drives…

 

Spitz Jr star ball on new motor driven central core web.jpg

…and I wanted Sun, Moon, and planet projectors. But no money to spend.

 

planet cage with peojectors web.jpg

 

How about projectors made from toilet paper tubes.

 

TP tube planet projector web.jpg

 

They worked great.

 

I made slip rings out of alternating circles of wood glued together and rapped with solid core wire.

 

lower slip ring device web.jpg

 

It actually worked.  I actually gave some shows to friends but without a dome to project on it just wasn't right.  But I wanted more, I wanted annular motions of the planets and I had no idea of how that worked.  That would come much later.  From the 1960’s to 2006, things lay dormant until I opened that box (Pandora’s?) and the story of three commercial projectors snatched from death begins.


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#33 skyward_eyes

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 07:49 AM

There is a group in Phoenix called Stargazing for Everyone that uses two portable (inflatable) planetariums. They are quite successful with schools and such. I think there is indeed some kind of demand for planetariums but many don't know where to go besides museums. 


Edited by skyward_eyes, 10 August 2016 - 07:51 AM.

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#34 bumm

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 12:08 PM

Fascinating stuff Ron.  :)

     I can remember wanting one of those Toy Spitz jobs back in the 50's after seeing one in a catalog, but my mom said they probably wouldn't work very well.  Compared to the one at the Planetarium, I'm sure she was right.  I finally bought one a few years ago, but I haven't even tried firing the thing up yet.  It just sits there on top of it's box, looking cool.  :)

                                                                                                      Marty


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#35 Ron Walker

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 12:58 PM

Fire it up Marty, you will be surprised how well it works.  If you find the stars too big I came up with a work around that uses a more modern small filament bulb the the original standard flashlight one Spitz used.



#36 bumm

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 01:34 PM

Fire it up Marty, you will be surprised how well it works.  If you find the stars too big I came up with a work around that uses a more modern small filament bulb the the original standard flashlight one Spitz used.

OK, I'm gonna do that.  (NOW look what you did.)  :)

                                                         Marty


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#37 Ron Walker

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 01:50 PM

The Story Continues:

 

Opening the box did it, yes I did open Pandora’s Box.  First I knew what I wanted and that was annular motion and I now knew how to make it happen.  I also knew that things made out of wood were not the most accurate in the world.  Yes, if I continued on this quest then I needed to dream and dream BIG.  Precision required metal and metal required lathes and milling machines.  I soon realized that dreaming BIG was going to cost big.  As I went through design after design looking for parts at the various surplus shops, those shops that sell what I call “Good Junk”, I soon found that inflation had found the suppliers of my basic materials as it had found any other commodity.  It looked like it would cost as much as buying a commercial unit to build one….well, not quite.  Planetarium projectors are expensive.

 

Then it hit me, could a used one be found, perhaps even one “as-is”?  I looked for some time and found a small Goto E-5 “as-is” machine.

 

E-5 projector web.jpg

 

I learned that the “5” indicated the proper size dome in meters, so a 15 foot dome would be more then I would ever need or could ever handle.  This would be perfect to bring the stars to the world (if I could pick the various parts up, that is).  The entire machine was taken down to its individual parts, cleaned, lubricated, and rewired.  I rebuilt my very original control box from Chicago to control this now working machine.

 

first control console web.jpg

 

What about a dome, that would indeed be the hardest part.  How in the world does one make a dome that is portable no less.  Out of material supported by some kind of framework would probably work.  The problem with this is not only the weight but the set up time would render the idea useless for a portable movable system.  Also I would need to have a fairly large space to put it up in.  Oh well, cross that bridge when we come to it.

 

But how to make the dome?  In gores it turns out and with a little higher math, that my good wife actually remembered, a formula was devised to do it.  First a small test dome to see if the numbers actually worked, and they did.

 

first experimental dome web.jpg

 

This dome actually proved useful with the Spitz Jr. projector but it was obvious that I couldn’t get many viewers under the dome.

 

Spitz Jr under test dome.jpg

 

The Goto E-5 is a nice pin hole machine that projects about 750 stars.  Almost twice as many as the Spitz Jr. and with better distinction between magnitudes.  But….darn it….750 stars was nothing at all like a good dark sky site.  This hobby was consuming me, Pandora’s Box was indeed open and I wanted more and more stars.  Perhaps I could drill more stars into the star ball, but there is a limitation on the fainter stars that is dependent on the distance from the light source to the pin hole representing the star.  The fainter the star the smaller the hole or the further away it has to be.  A pin hole projector is like a pin hole camera in reverse.  Each star is a projection of the light source and in this case a small filament bulb.  Small star balls project a lot of filament images for stars.  The larger the star ball, the smaller (and more star like) the star images become.  Obviously there is a trade off in literally every aspect of pin hole projection technology, but rather then invent the wheel all over again why not go to the king of pin hole technology, Spitz himself.  His technology reached the peak in the A3P projector and that technology was used until the company stopped making pin hole projectors.

 

What I needed was an A3P star ball which projected some 1500 stars.  The larger 18 inch diameter was indeed the perfect compromise and one in which I could plot and drill (with a #80 drill [do you have any idea of how small that is]) as many as another 1000 very faint stars.  I would then mount it on the E-5 and have a “class act” projector.  Finally something even I would be happy with.

 

A3P star globe web.jpg

 

I found one and purchased it “as-is” which meant it had a bunch of dents.  No problem, with a small tack hammer and a easy hand I soon had the star ball if operational shape.  The problem (you knew there was one, didn’t you) was the weight.  Even if I could mount it, the physical size and weight made it much too much for the rest of the E-5.  Even if I could get it balanced, there would be no moving it.  Fragile it would be and still in one place it would stay.  No, this would not work at all, my dreams were crushed. It was over….unless…


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#38 Ron Walker

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 01:53 PM

 

Fire it up Marty, you will be surprised how well it works.  If you find the stars too big I came up with a work around that uses a more modern small filament bulb the the original standard flashlight one Spitz used.

OK, I'm gonna do that.  (NOW look what you did.)  :)

                                                         Marty

 

Watch out, the planetarium virus is more lethal then any other one I know.  Once caught you will want to do nothing more then make stars under a dome.



#39 jtsenghas

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 01:59 PM

...Maybe I should stop reading this thread. I haven't been vaccinated and have too many works in progress....

 

Do continue, please! 


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#40 Ron Walker

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 10:28 PM

Unless, yes unless I could find the rest of an A3P and then have two separate planetariums.  The E-5 in a portable dome and the A3P in a more permanent one say even 20 feet in diameter.  Building domes was indeed a challenge but certainly it could be done.  Once the projectors were completed and in operational order I could then worry about the domes.  Again I looked for and found enough “as-is” parts to make a complete mechanical machine.

 

 

From my research I was finding that the mechanical parts of these projectors tended to last a substantially long time and it was the electronics that basically ended there useable life.  That was probably the excuse used to get whoever held the purse strings to pop for a new digital planetarium system.

One of the interesting things about the A3P’s planetary projectors is that each one is controlled by an individual synchronous motor.

 

Planet cage with motors web.JPG

 

You will note two motors on the projector at the 4 o’clock position.  This is for the Moon and because of its much faster motion an extra motor was added for torque.  Also the motor at the very center is for the Sun projector.  They are then controlled by a variable frequency drive to change speed.  This works well when the power is applied but synchronization goes belly up when the power is removed. As each motor slows to a stop, the sync between the planets tends to drift.  The Moon the most because it moves the fastest.  Spitz saw this problem and added a DC voltage to all the motors when the machine was set to stop, but there was always a bit of time as the switch was moved that slippage took place.  Thus operators would need to adjust and correct for this from time to time to keep the positions of the planets in their place.  It was said that each planet drive has its own motor so the replacement because of wear would be easy.  Now, like all planetarium projectors, wear is minimal if at all.  Since making a new variable frequency electronic drive would be expensive and probably limiting to output speed I wondered about a simple mechanical connection between all of the various drives.  After all, the sync between the Sun and the Earth had to be the same for all the planets, so why not lock them mechanically and do away with the slippage problem altogether.  Then I could drive them all with one DC motor for a much larger speed range.  But how to tie them all together.  Obviously one could use gears, but the positions would be critical and have you priced gears lately?  No, I would use my old standby, timing belts.  First remove all of the original motors.

 

planet cage without motors web.JPG

 

Then one large timing belt around all of the various drives.

 

single drive belt planets.JPG

 

A problem quickly popped up.  Not enough teeth engaged at the gears and there was slippage.  The answer, a belt between each drive.

 

all planet drives with idlers.JPG

 

Now I could go on for pages and pages on this rebuild but I will hold off unless requested.

 

Ron with A3P web.JPG

 

So now I had a complete Spitz A3P that worked and I couldn’t be more happy nor more satisfied.  I had a level of projector I never ever expected to have.  All I needed to do was build some kind of projection dome and I wouldn’t be happier.  That is when the phone call came.


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#41 bumm

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 07:40 AM

Please go on.  :)  I won't be doing this, but I can fantasize...

                                           Marty


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#42 Ron Walker

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 12:42 PM

Hello, it was a call from a good friend that knew of my interest in all things planetarium.  “There’s a projector going up for bids that you might be interested in”, he said.  “I am very happy with what I have”, I responded.  “You should at least look at it, I think you’ll be interested.  Bids are open for only three days over this next weekend”, said he.  The information was passed and we hung up.

I have heard it said that when one stops looking, what one was looking for tends to pop up directly in front of oneself.  So here was a Minolta IIB museum grade projector up for bid.

 

E.JPG

 

There was no way I could afford this, certainly it would go for a lot more then I could afford. I did really like it though.  It was basically a half scale model of that Zeiss II that I had grown up with.  Now even if I had a Zeiss II what could I do with it, after all it required a 60 foot dome.  Even if I could build it, where could I build it.  Now this particular machine was designed for a 30 foot dome, more in the realm of possibility.  No-No-NO…I am very happy with what I have, I don’t need or want anymore…but it does look exactly like my favorite Zeiss.

 

My friend kept hounding me so just to keep him off my back I placed a bid on Friday morning.  On Monday morning I had won.  What???…How???…Oh didn’t you know, you have two weeks to come and get it out of here.  Where is here?  San Antonio, Texas and I’m in Arizona.

Needless to say the die was cast and the trip was made.  My friend had an enclosed trailer and came along to help (he better had) and the deed was done.

 

Brian Snow the planetarium director congratulates me.  He originally picked the Minolta machine back in 1975 when it replaced the original  Spitz A3P.  He wanted to pick the digital replacement before his retirement.

 

Ron and Brian Snow.JPG

 

With a Harbor Freight close by, an engine hoist made removal of the central core much easier.

 

central core to engine hoist.JPG

 

The support structure was the last to go.  We did this in only three days.

 

finished removal.JPG

 

The last show given in Texas was on Friday the 13th of June, 2008.  It would be interesting if it would ever shine again.


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#43 jtsenghas

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 12:59 PM

That is just like the one recently retired at Bowling Green State University in Ohio--the one I referred to in an earlier post on this thread.  Would you like to put a bid in for that one too? A "parts projector?" :lol:


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#44 Ron Walker

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 01:33 PM

Back home safe and sound with pieces of planetarium all about the house (my dear wife is the most supportive and understanding person I know) I breath easier.  I have the north star ball in the living room and I can sit by it, pet it, and whisper “my precious” to it.  I have even wired it up to run.  The star field is, in a word, spectacular, even with the square corners of the room.  I want to move through the night with diurnal motion but am not at all successful trying to hand hold this 70 pound globe.  A dome must be built and my wife couldn’t be happier with the decision.  No, not the way you think, she has been behind me the whole way and really wants to see it in operation again.

 

Building permit people have no idea what a geodesic structure is.  They understand square or they understand engineering stamped plans.  Bids from three different engineers placed the cost at around $80K.  I guess this will never happen.  The never say die in me finds a geodesic kit for a 30 foot dome (something I can build myself) with engineering to California standards within my price range. Wow, engineered to more stringent specifications then Arizona requires, this should be a breeze.  What, it has to be stamped to Arizona standards by an Arizona approved engineer even though it is already designed to stricter standards?  Well…yes…that’s the requirement.  The local engineers will gladly stamp the plans for $8K or they will build it with my kit for about $60K.  The dream is fading fast.

 

The kit builder wants the sale and finds an engineer in Washington State who has 48 different stamps for as many states and has never engineered a dome before.  He does the plans for $800.  I get a 150 page book with the X,Y,Z torque and load on each 2X4 in the structure as well as diagrams like this.

 

 

 

 

I present this material to the town building people and as their eyes glaze over I here they will give it a “look see”.  In two weeks I get my building permit.  This process has taken two and a half years and is my Christmas present for 2011.

 

January of 2012 the building will begin.  How much of a problem can that be?


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#45 Ron Walker

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 01:50 PM

That is just like the one recently retired at Bowling Green State University in Ohio--the one I referred to in an earlier post on this thread.  Would you like to put a bid in for that one too? A "parts projector?" :lol:

As much as a parts projector sounds intriguing, my "discretionary funds" account has been depleted long ago. I'll be driving my 16 year old van for a while yet.  Yet, the choice between new wheels and my planetarium, the planetarium wins every time.  Besides, the projector I have is so well built that it will very probably out last me.  Now, if it was a Zeiss.  :love:



#46 Ron Walker

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 03:09 PM

All I can say is, thank God for friends.  Especially friends that have big toys and have been in the building trades.  If any of you want a detailed construction report, I could easily fill 50 pages or more with images and the intricacies of the building project.  For fear that would get me banned from these pages forever I will touch only on the highlights below.  If you kind readers wish more detailed information you need only ask and I will try and answer any and all questions.

 

The project starts with layout of the dome base, a ten sided edifice in this particular kit.
 

lay out of dome web.jpg

Next a road cut in to the construction area.

road in to building site web.jpg

 

machine wins web.jpg

road in web.jpg

Since building on fill dirt is a no-no without a lot of costly prep so one side needs a four foot cut on one side to flatten out the site.

4 foot cut web.jpg

 

All laid out and ready for back hoe..

level and laid out web.jpg

 

Some parts of this are actually kinda fun.

 

I get in the fun web.jpg

Foundation trench is cut.

trenching begins web.jpg
 

trenching finished web.jpg

Foundation steel placed.

steel for foundation web.jpg

More to come



#47 bumm

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 04:49 PM

This is amazing.  Very fascinating...  :)

 

ON A WHOLE DIFFERENT SCALE:

As you suggested, I fired up my toy Spitz today.  It's been sitting on it's box in my office at work where nobody else ever goes, just as a fun decorator object.  I plugged it in, turned up the brightness, and somewhat to my surprise, the bulb was still good and it lit up!  The Big Dipper, Leo, and Bootes appeared on the wall, and the Little Dipper and Cassiopeia showed up on the ceiling.  Yeah, the stars were fuzzy little disks, but that's what I expected, and I was very pleased.  It took me almost 60 years to flip the switch on one of these things.  :) 

                                                                                                Marty


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#48 Ron Walker

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 05:08 PM

I'm getting to old for this.

 

getting old web.jpg

 

Foundation concrete poured.  Good to have a lot of friends.

 

2nd side pour.JPG

 

Stem is strange enough it is cheaper to make forms then rent them.

 

forms out to dry web.jpg

 

Stem walls made and placed with rebar steel.

 

a lot of steel in stem web.jpg

 

Ready to mix and pour.

 

readdy to pour web.jpg

 

Concrete poured (164 bags) Friends actually came back.

 

finished with pour web.jpg

 

Wiring conduit placed under ground between center projector location and control desk location.

 

electrical tubing in web.jpg

 

Floor slab poured.  I had a pro do this so I would have an even floor.

 

smoothing 2.JPG

 

even a smooth edge.JPG

 

 


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#49 jtsenghas

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 05:25 PM

Excellent work! I'm curious about a few details.  How thick is that slab?  Five or six inches?  Did you cut strain relief grooves into it? Did you do anything to compact that sandy soil beneath it beyond what compaction you got from driving the heavy equipment on it?  What method did you use to measure level? Transit? Water level in tubes? Laser? 

 

That's an impressive project.  Nothing in half measures! 


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#50 Ron Walker

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 05:34 PM

Framing in seven layers.

 

1st level c-u view left.JPG

 

2nd level trapizoide is screwed into place.JPG

 

3rd level finish 3.JPG

 

4 th level complete interior view.JPG

 

5 th level finished 4.JPG

 

6th level final 1.JPG

 

7th level finished 5.JPG

 

Time exposures foretell what will be projected within.

 

orion.JPG

 

big dipper.JPG

 

Exterior sheathing.

 

 

base almost finished 2.JPG

 

1-5-12 The beginnings of row #6.JPG

 


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