Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Classic Best NGC

beginner classic dso EAA observing refractor
  • Please log in to reply
97 replies to this topic

#1 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 22 August 2016 - 03:48 AM

     I’m currently on a tour to the Messier objects with my vintage 80mm refractor, and I am closing in on completing the observations down to 0° DEC; The remaining M-objects from 0° to -15° should be reachable from my 56° N latitude in this upcoming season, while the ones from  -15° down to -30° will pose a greater challenge (and the handful below -30° will require a journey down south).

 

     Anyway, with UMa hiding behind the neighbour’s trees to the N of my backyard, I’m at the moment out of convenient M-objects to catch, and so I have been looking towards the next step for my deep sky journey with the small 3" refractor. I have been  studying the most often recommended lists of ”Finest NGC Objects”, such as the RASC (Royal Astro. Soc. Of Canada), the SAC  (Saguaro Astro. Club of Phoenix), the CALDWELL (Patrick Moore) and the ACAC (Ancient City Astronomy Club: HERSCHEL-400). I’ve searched for a cross-reference for  these lists, but found none. So I went ahead and compiled my own. There’s understandably quite a bit of overlap between the lists, but I found the RASC list to be the best suited for my 56° N latitude, as well as the best founded and documented.  So that will be my starting point for visiting the ”Finest NGCs”.

 

     Here’s the "best" Summer NGCs, sorted by RASC#, -- most of these objects are still well placed for observation at midnight from my latitude. I plan to aim for some of these, when the Messiers are hiding behind trees or the moon.

 

RASC-FinestNGC-Summer.png

 

 

      I will - as for the Messiers - be using my Vixen FL80S/640 refractor on Zeiss Ib EQ mount, with primarily orthoscopic glass eyepieces, and I will be using the classic technique of sketching my impressions of the objects. But, as O’Meara wrote in the introduction to his Herschel 400 Observation Guide :

 

”I used a 4-inch telescope to observe the Herschel objects, which is considered small by today’s standards. Most observers will be using larger (much larger?) telescopes, that will show more detail. So a drawing of a 12th-magnitude galaxy as seen through a 4-inch (essentially a ghost mote of light) does little to help someone using , say, a decent 12-inch reflector under a dark sky... The photograph, on the other hand, demonstrates a more ’perfect’ view; it shows the true glory of the object.”

 

    I will be using neither a 12” nor AP, but I will supplement my visual backends of the 3" refractor with a  ”spacewalk (EVA) eyepiece”, ie:  Enhanced Visual Astronomy using real time live video, using my small R2 ccd/lcd.

 

    Because I’d like to also see the ”true glory of the object”.

 

Allan

 

And RASC summer NGC list, extended with summer objects from the other lists, sorted by constellation:

 

NGC-Summer.png


Edited by AllanDystrup, 22 August 2016 - 04:47 AM.

  • sparrowhawk, jimsmith, Sarkikos and 9 others like this

#2 jimsmith

jimsmith

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 212
  • Joined: 11 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Herefordshire, UK

Posted 22 August 2016 - 06:17 AM

Thanks for that Allan. I will use that list next time I'm out. Jim.


  • AllanDystrup likes this

#3 stevecoe

stevecoe

    Astronomical Tourist

  • *****
  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 5,050
  • Joined: 24 Apr 2004
  • Loc: Arizona, USA

Posted 22 August 2016 - 05:26 PM

Allan;

I am always glad to hear from someone using and enjoying the SAC data. We did start
with the entire NGC for the SAC deep sky database. It contains over 10,000 objects and
would keep you and the 80mm scope busy for quite a while.

When creating the Best of the NGC list we are in Arizona, so at 33 degrees north we
did include some objects over your horizon. But, I was glad to see the combinations
of several lists were useful to you.

Clear skies;
Steve Coe
  • AllanDystrup likes this

#4 Lorence

Lorence

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,267
  • Joined: 15 Sep 2008

Posted 26 August 2016 - 02:44 PM

It hadn't occurred to be before but there still is an advantage to using the traditional eyepiece instead of the new electronic versions.

 

One can memorize the traditional observers lists without much difficulty.

 

I can't even start to put my electronic viewing list into a message. You need a computer program to sort out what is visible through the electronics in any part of the sky at any time.

 

During those time when It just isn't quite worth viewing with an eyepiece take a moment to see what we are up to. Your entire list may still be viewable electronically during those times along with a few hundred more from my list.

 

Think about it like going on vacation. It's not the trip that's important, it's the destination. Once your there who cares how you got there. :)


Edited by Lorence, 26 August 2016 - 02:45 PM.


#5 desertrefugee

desertrefugee

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,952
  • Joined: 06 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Arizona

Posted 26 August 2016 - 08:33 PM

To my way of thinking, visual observing demands visual tools.  Pure Optics.  Once you start herding electrons, to me, the magic is lost and it becomes a bit more "sterile".   

 

To expand on the vacation analogy, "Why bother with "going" to the destination at all if a "virtual" visit can be electronically accessed"?

 

(Great work, Allan).


Edited by desertrefugee, 26 August 2016 - 08:34 PM.

  • Sarkikos, jackofalltrades and VariableBob like this

#6 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 27 August 2016 - 06:31 AM

@Steve:
I thank you for providing the SAC list; I'm using Paul Dickson's booklet on the SAC NGC objects, and am especially happy with his detailed maps. I also found out, that he has a nice cross ref. for the SAC, the Caldwell and the Herschel 400 lists in the Index of the documentation. Very nice!

 

@Lorence and Darrel, on glass vs. electronics:
yes, there definitely is an aestetical difference between the often faint, delicate scotopic view through a glass eyepiece and a more detailed integrated color view rendered on a HD lcd screen, be that almost real time using EAA. I happen to like both, and I try to use them for what they are best at. As can be seen from the following observation (I hope).

 

 

Classic NGC Observations
Blinking Planetary:   R 97, Planetary Nebula (NGC 6826)

 

_______________________________________ DATA ___________________________________________
R97, NGC 6826 (PN): 
  Pos.: RA:19h44.8m, DEC:50°31’, Con: Cygnus, ”Blinking PN”, E of double 16 Cyg (both 6
m ,40” sep)
  Mag.: 8.5m;  SB: m/min , Dim: 27” x 24”; 
  Rating: 4/5 (5=easy), Min. Aperture: 50mm (10x50 bino: faint star)

 

_______________________________________ OBSERVATIONS_____________________________ 
Obs-1:  
  Time: 2016-08-24, 23:45 UT,  Loc.:56N 12E Denmark, Alleroed, Setup:1.5xGPC + K-40mm; R2 ccd/lcd
  Transp.: 4-5/7, Seeing: 6-7/10, Bortle: red, Suburban (SQM 18, NELM 5.0)

 

_______________________________________ COMMENTS  _____________________________
(Obs-1): 
     It’s a cosy, late august early summer morning, at 01:45 local DST. I’m under a Bortle red / bordering on green suburban night sky, with well above medium transp. and seeing, and the rising moon still out of the way, below 20° Alt. towards the E.

     My main target for tonight is RASC 97 (NGC6826): the ”Blinking” planetary nebula, up at 60° Alt in the left wing of Cygnus. I start my star hop from Iot Cyg-> 1½° SE to The Cyg, then -> 1° E to the beautiful 6m double: 16 Cyg. With 16 Cyg to the right (W) in my 1.8° FOV of the K-40mm finder eyepiece I have R97 close to the center @ 24x magnification, nicely ”blinking” in and out of existence when I shift my vision from averted to direct. With direct vision I see a small, round and faint nebulous spot with a hint of elongation (?), and a bright starlike center. This impression is confirmed by clicking up the magnification using my CZJ orthos, to first 34x and then 84x.

 

R97-01 (NGC 6826) WHITE.jpg
*Click Me*

 

(Continued below...)
 


Edited by AllanDystrup, 27 August 2016 - 06:35 AM.

  • vintageoptics likes this

#7 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 27 August 2016 - 06:52 AM


Blinking Planetary - Continued
R 97, Planetary Nebula (NGC 6826)

 

 

     For more detail, I click in my R2 ccd/lcd, yielding a live view of ~106x @ 30’ FOV.  The SE-NW elongation of the core area is now obvious, as is the inner, nebulous shell of the PN.

 

     I can’t detect the faint spherical outer shell, nor the fliers in the inner shell from the jet of the central star. I didn’t expect that either, but I was positively surprised by being able to actually see the core area being elongated by the jet heating up the central shell – as confirmed later at the the PC, where I could zoom in on a snapshot of the PN.

 

R97-02 (NGC 6826) WHITE-S.jpg
*Click me*

 

R97.png

 

Allan

 

PS: Not sure the LUMICON DS filter did any good for this observation --
it seemed to dim the view more that it brought out the PN.


Edited by AllanDystrup, 27 August 2016 - 07:00 AM.

  • Sasa and vintageoptics like this

#8 GlennLeDrew

GlennLeDrew

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15,850
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2008
  • Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Posted 27 August 2016 - 07:48 AM

Until this thread I had never seen the finest NGC objects assigned the designation, "R" (for "RASC", presumably.) It's problematic, if not dangerous, to invent, on the fly, new object list acronyms. If no conflict exists, not so awfully problematic, but if the 'new' designation does conflict, that's a grievous faux pas. The "R" resignation is currently assigned to reflection nebula complexes, and so should be considered as unavailable for use in any other context outside the peer review process (wherein the definitions are unambiguously set forth.)



#9 Lorence

Lorence

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,267
  • Joined: 15 Sep 2008

Posted 27 August 2016 - 01:52 PM

To my way of thinking, visual observing demands visual tools.  Pure Optics.  Once you start herding electrons, to me, the magic is lost and it becomes a bit more "sterile".   

 

To expand on the vacation analogy, "Why bother with "going" to the destination at all if a "virtual" visit can be electronically accessed"?

 

(Great work, Allan).

 

Why bother to look at something you can't see? The beauty of a heard of electrons is that you can actually see what the telescope is pointed at. That's something I always wanted to do when I viewed with eyepieces. I did that for fifty years. How much time have you spent using an electronic eyepiece? 



#10 stargzr66207

stargzr66207

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 470
  • Joined: 28 Aug 2014
  • Loc: Kansas, USA

Posted 27 August 2016 - 05:16 PM

I often find myself "torn" between my two astronomical loves..visual observing and CCD imaging. Lately I have solved this dilemma by refurbishing and modernizing a classic 6-inch f/8 newtonian with a mirror I ground, polished and figured myself. I can now enjoy my "old" scope under Mag. 21.4 skies while my C-11 is gathering photons through a Starlight Express SXVR-H694C camera. Sort of the best of both worlds.
Ron Abbott
  • Carl Kolchak likes this

#11 Lorence

Lorence

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,267
  • Joined: 15 Sep 2008

Posted 28 August 2016 - 01:40 PM

I can now enjoy my "old" scope under Mag. 21.4 skies while my C-11 is gathering photons through a Starlight Express SXVR-H694C camera. Sort of the best of both worlds.
Ron Abbott

The electronic eyepiece has opened a whole new world for viewing What you should be saying is "Two otta three ain't bad." :)

 

21.4 seems to be a number many consider as being a pretty good dark site. It's probably the average of the good nights at my site.

 

Those of us lucky enough to step out into a back yard under skies that dark are few in number. Most live in badly light polluted areas and are limited to viewing the moon, planets and a handful of deep sky objects that are bright enough to be seen without difficulty. Sadly that keeps a lot of optical hardware gathering dust in closets and garages.

 

It safe to say thousands of former observers have rediscovered the Universe with modern technology. They are seeing more now in badly light polluted areas than they have ever seen before, even in their favorite dark sites. Electronics is breathing new life into the hobby regardless of the criticism It receives from traditionalists who in some cases have never even viewed with an electronic eyepiece. It's a lot like someone who has never eaten in any restaurant other than MacDonald's saying food is food, why go into a five star restaurant for a steak and all the trimming when a burger will fill you up just as well.


  • elwaine likes this

#12 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 30 August 2016 - 10:09 AM

Classic NGC Observations
"Snowglobe" Planetary Nebula:
RASC 95, SAC 3, NGC 6781, Herschel 358 (3-743)

    

    
_______________________________________ DATA __________________________________
RASC 95 (PN):  Pos.: RA:19h18.5m, DEC:+06°32’, Con: Aquila, ”Snowball" PN

NGC 6781       2½° ENE of 19 Aql, Mag.: 11.8m; SB:? m/amin , Diam: 111”; Dist: 4 KLY
               Rating: 4/5 (5=easy)

 

_______________________________________ OBSERVATIONS___________________________ 
Obs-1:    Time: 2016-08-27, 22:30-23-30 UT,  Loc.:56N 12E Denmark, Alleroed,
          Setup: 1.7xGPC + K40/O25/O16mm; R2 live video
          Transp.: 4/7 (no moon), Seeing: 6/10, Bortle: Orange, bright suburban
          (SQM 18.6, NELM 5.4m)

_______________________________________ COMMENTS  ____________________________

(Obs-1):  It’s past midnight in late August, 01:30 local DST. I’m in my Bortle orange suburban backyard with above medium transparancy and seeing, and I’ve just finished observing M102, the ”Spindle” galaxy in Draco. I decide to close the night (morning) with a view of RASC 95 (NGC 6781): the ”Snowball” planetary nebula in the right wing of Aquila.

     I start my star hop at the neck of the Eagle: from Mu Aql -> I pan W ca. 4½° to the bright 5m star 19 Aql;  Just 1½° E of 19 Aql is a line of three 6-7m stars, and NGC 6781 is located just E of the northernmost star in this line (a nice visual double of 6.7m + 9m, Sep ~3’ in PA 275°).

 

     I place the double star to the W in the 1.8° FOV of my K-40mm eyepiece @24x, and the PN now shows up as a small and round, faint hazy spot in the center of the field. Clicking up the magnification using my CZJ orthos to 38x and 60x confirms (still using averted vision) the round, pale nebulous glow, but yields no further details. This is what Steven O’Meara described as the Ghost of the Moon.

 

RASC-095 WHITE1S.jpg
*click me*

 

Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 30 August 2016 - 10:19 AM.

  • Dan Williams, Sasa and member010719 like this

#13 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 30 August 2016 - 10:13 AM

Continued ...

"Snowglobe" Planetary Nebula:
RASC 95, SAC 3, NGC 6781, Herschel 358 (3-743)

  

    

     For more detail, I click in my R2 ccd/lcd, yielding a live view of ~106x @ 30’ FOV.  I set the ccd exposure to 5s, gain at 36db with averaging/DNR of each 6 exposures..., and watch the details build up on the small HD lcd screen for the next 30 seconds. WOW! 

  

     I now see an almost 3-D version of the ”Snowglobe” PN: the spherical shell of gas is a perfectly round nebula, with the edge of the sphere delineated as a bright ring around 3-4 stars in the center.

  

 

 

Allan

Attached Thumbnails

  • NGC-6781-PSP.png

Edited by AllanDystrup, 31 August 2016 - 10:06 AM.

  • Dan Williams, Sasa and vintageoptics like this

#14 VariableBob

VariableBob

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 28
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2015

Posted 30 August 2016 - 11:12 AM

To my way of thinking, visual observing demands visual tools.  Pure Optics.  Once you start herding electrons, to me, the magic is lost and it becomes a bit more "sterile".   

 

To expand on the vacation analogy, "Why bother with "going" to the destination at all if a "virtual" visit can be electronically accessed"?

 

(Great work, Allan).

Great post.  I have seen a huge number of Milky Way pictures recently; however nothing beats a dark cool night and the naked eye or a pair of binoculars.  First of all the eye has a greater dynamic range than a camera and the brain instantaneously processes the picture unto a real image incorporating ones emotions.  A digital picture is flat and lifeless and does not give on the thrill that one gets observing an object 'live'.


  • member010719 likes this

#15 Lorence

Lorence

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,267
  • Joined: 15 Sep 2008

Posted 30 August 2016 - 03:16 PM

 

To my way of thinking, visual observing demands visual tools.  Pure Optics.  Once you start herding electrons, to me, the magic is lost and it becomes a bit more "sterile".   

 

To expand on the vacation analogy, "Why bother with "going" to the destination at all if a "virtual" visit can be electronically accessed"?

 

(Great work, Allan).

Great post.  I have seen a huge number of Milky Way pictures recently; however nothing beats a dark cool night and the naked eye or a pair of binoculars.  First of all the eye has a greater dynamic range than a camera and the brain instantaneously processes the picture unto a real image incorporating ones emotions.  A digital picture is flat and lifeless and does not give on the thrill that one gets observing an object 'live'.

 

 

Please elaborate. Much of what we do is live. I have spent hundreds, probably thousands of hours viewing with electronics as well as with eyepieces. More than enough to make a fair comparison between the two. Have you enough experience to make a fair comparison?  When I hear someones making a statement like you have made the first thing that comes to mind is that the comment is purely emotional. Can you honestly say you have seen a full range of the kinds of viewing we do? Have you heard experienced observers make remarks like "I never thought you could see so much with those cameras"  or "I wish I had known about this long ago." Anything beyond viewing with the naked eye involves some form of technology to alter the light. The "Purity" is compromised as soon as a photon hits anything but the retina.

 

Using a term like "Pure" can raise a few eyebrows. It suggests an extraordinary belief in ones idea and opinions. Not the sort of way people should be comparing observing methods. Leave that for those that might prefer a drink like Grain Alcohol and Rainwater. :)

 

Flat and lifeless? Also fair description of an averted vision eyepiece view. If you simply want to discredit a group of astronomers and viewing methods that you do not understand you could at least show that you have given the subject some thought.


  • mwedel likes this

#16 Organic Astrochemist

Organic Astrochemist

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 988
  • Joined: 10 Jan 2015

Posted 04 September 2016 - 02:45 PM

 


Blinking Planetary - Continued
R 97, Planetary Nebula (NGC 6826)

 

 

     For more detail, I click in my R2 ccd/lcd, yielding a live view of ~106x @ 30’ FOV.  The SE-NW elongation of the core area is now obvious, as is the inner, nebulous shell of the PN.

 

     I can’t detect the faint spherical outer shell, nor the fliers in the inner shell from the jet of the central star. I didn’t expect that either, but I was positively surprised by being able to actually see the core area being elongated by the jet heating up the central shell – as confirmed later at the the PC, where I could zoom in on a snapshot of the PN.

 

attachicon.gifR97-02 (NGC 6826) WHITE-S.jpg
*Click me*

 

attachicon.gifR97.png

 

Allan

 

PS: Not sure the LUMICON DS filter did any good for this observation --
it seemed to dim the view more that it brought out the PN.

 

This is a fun target for different views.

With my 8" I took the magnification up to 500X which revealed an oval nebula with a very bright center. The sensation of brightness of the center compared to the oval was intense, almost painful. I would have liked to look with my OIII filter, but I was using that for imaging...

 

With my 6" and ASI178MM-Cool camera with OIII filter I got the following image with 40 minutes of integration.NGC 6826 CROPPED.jpg

There is a very large halo around this object that I didn't capture. I did get some of the shells and the two polar jets, which are often rendered red (H-alpha) so I was glad to see them.

 

I wonder what of this structure can be seen visually? To me, the brightness of the center was overwhelming but perhaps with the correct combination of filters and/or aperture, more details would be possible.


  • payner and AllanDystrup like this

#17 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 16 September 2016 - 04:10 AM

Classic Best NGC Observations – Fall Casseiopeia
Pacman Neb:   RASC 7, SAC 13, C---, H--- NGC 281

 

RASC 7:  Pos: RA:00h52.8m,DEC:+56°37’, Con:Cassiopeia, ”Pacman” Neb.(HII)
NGC 281  Mag.: 7.0m;  SB: low m/min , Dim: 35’, 48LY; Dist: 10 KLY;
         Rating: 1/5 (5=easy);  Discoverer: E. E. Barnard, 1883

 

Obs-1:   Time: 2016-09-14, 20:30-21:30 UT,  Loc: 56N 12E Denmark, Alleroed,
         Setup: 1.7xGPC + O16mm;  0.5x Red + R2 live video
         Transp.: 3/7 (95% Moon @ 21° Alt), Seeing: 6/10,
         Bortle Red (SQM 17.3, NELM 4.7m)

 

Info:    NGC 281 is an H II region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the quintuple star HD 5005 (Beta1, 8m primary with 4 companions), and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to the video game character.

 

 

     It’s a mild, mid-September summer evening, 22:30 local time, and there’s a 95% Moon at 21° Alt towards the S (NELM 4.7m), so I won’t try for M73 in Aquarius tonight, -- mostly because the star hop would be hard given these conditions. Instead I aim my Vixen 80/640mm refractor at Cassiopeia, high up at 60° Alt towards the E. I want to give NGC 281 (RASC 7) a try with my small 80mm refractor.

    

     In the 1.8° of my K-40mm finder eyepiece (24x), I aim to get a small line of 3 stars to the SE in the FOV, plus a triangle to the N; I then have a slightly fuzzy star at the center of the field: the quintuple HD5005, located in the small open cluster IC 1590, that forms “the eye” of the Pacman Nebula. I now click up the magnification to 60x (CZJ O-16mm, @ 42’ FOV). This should give me all of the nebulosity that is seen in photography in the field – but I can only glimpse a small hazy spot around HD5005, slightly elongated in the NNE-SSW direction.

    

NGC281-CZJ O16 BLACK-CROP-S-.jpg
*click me*

 

 Allan
PS:
I've indicated the extent of the Pacman Nebula as seen on photographies on my drawing
(the dotted line). -- I did *NOT* observe this nebulosity with my 80mm...


Edited by AllanDystrup, 16 September 2016 - 05:03 AM.

  • vintageoptics likes this

#18 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 16 September 2016 - 04:57 AM

NGC 281 - RASC 7  continued

 

     Switching now to live video (R2, 110x @ 30’ FOV), I hope to catch a larger extent of the nebula, -- but I’m only able to get a close up view of IC 1590 including the triangular nebulosity around HD5005. Nice enough - but no Pacman...

 

NGC281-R2 Black CROP.jpg

*click me*

 

I decide to try Pacman again later this season, under more favourable conditions.

And also try it with UHC filter.

Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 16 September 2016 - 08:00 AM.

  • Sasa likes this

#19 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 16 September 2016 - 07:56 AM

Here's my compilation of "Best NGC" fall objects :

 

Best NGC Fall Objects.png

(R:RASC, S:SAC, C:Caldwell, H:Herschel)

 

CS / Allan



#20 MP173

MP173

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,206
  • Joined: 30 Oct 2015

Posted 16 September 2016 - 10:10 AM

Sept 16, 2015 with 90mmETX I was able to detect the nebula.  Not much detail, but it was noted.  My sketch is similar but not as detailed as yours.

 

ed


  • AllanDystrup likes this

#21 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 17 September 2016 - 09:30 AM

Classic NGC Observations
OWL (E.T.) OC:   NGC457, RASC 8, SAC 14, Herschel 16 (1-42) Open Cluster

RASC 8 OC):  Pos.: RA:01h19.1m, DEC:+58°17’, Con: Cassiopeia,

NGC 457      Owl (or E.T., or Phi CAS) Open Cluster in Perseus Arm

             Mag.: 6.4m;  SB: m/min , Dim: 20’; Dist: 7.9 KLY; Age: 20 MYR

             Rating: 5/5 (5=easy); Discoverer: W. Herschel, 1787

Obs-1:       Time: 2016-09-14, 22:30 UT,Loc.:56N 12E Denmark, Alleroed,

             Setup: 1.7xGPC + ATC N-8mm; 0.5x RED +R2 live video

             Transp.: 3/7 (95% Moon), Seeing: 7/10, Bortle: Red,suburban (SQM 17.3,NELM 4.7m)

 

     Continuing my observation of NGCs in Cassiopeia, I now sweep the 80mm refractor from NGC 281 (the ”Pacman” nebula) below Eta Cas, up NE towards Delta Casiopeiae (Ruchbach);  Ca 2° SW of Del Cas, I catch the faint nebulosity of NGC 457 surrounding the bright double star Phi Cassiopeiae.
    

     Actually Phi CAS is a multiple star system, where the brightest pair of supergiants (A/Phi-1: 5m, C/Phi-2: 7m; 134” Sep) are marking the Owl’s glaring eyes. In my 80mm refractor @ 107x (ATC Nagler-8mm), Phi-1 is a beautiful warm, distinctly yellow/gold type F0 star, while Phi-2 is the cool violet/bluish companion of type B6. Phi CAS is probably a foreground star system (2.3 KLY distance?).
    

     Many  stars around 9m-10m are arranged in pairs and chains forming a skeletal pattern with two ”arms” reaching out E and SW plus a backbone up towards the NW   :
 

RASC8-N8-BlackS.jpg

*click*

 

Allan

 

 


Edited by AllanDystrup, 17 September 2016 - 09:33 AM.

  • photiost, Sasa and mitsos68 like this

#22 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 17 September 2016 - 09:38 AM

NGC 457 / RASC 8 / The Owl Cluster - continued

 

     For an even better view, I click the Zeiss revolver over to the R2 ccd/lcd/dvr, yielding 110x @ 0.3° FOV.  WOW!, what a beautiful cluster, exploding in a myriad of fainter stars... There is a multitude of tiny points of light, down to the limit of resolution (what O’Meara called: ”The Ghost’s clothes hanging in tatters from its skeletal limbs”). Noteworthy in the proper cluster is a type M red giant  star: HD236697, close to the center of the OC.

 

     Fireworks on a mid september midnight... Marvelous!

 

RASC8-R2-BlackS.jpg

 

Allan


  • photiost and Sasa like this

#23 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 18 September 2016 - 08:11 AM

Classic NGC Observations
Caroline’s/White Rose/Haystack OC:

NGC 7789, RASC 008, SAC016, CALD---, HER398 (6-30) HOG:p-288.

 

RASC 8 (OC):  Pos.: RA:23h57.5m, DEC:+56°43’, Con: Cassiopeia, 3° SW of Bet CAS. 
NGC 457       Caroline’s White Rose (or Haystack) OC,

              Mag.: 6.6m;  SB: m/min , Dim: 25’; Dist:  8 KLY; Age: 1.6 GYR

              Rating: 5/5   (5=easy);  Discoverer: Caroline Herschel, 1783

Obs-1:    Time: 2016-09-13, 21:00 UT,  Loc.:56N 12E Denmark, Alleroed,

          Setup: 1.7xGPC + CZJ O-16mm; 0.5x RED +R2 live video
          Transp.: 3-4/7 (11dy/89% Moon, 18° Alt), Seeing: 7/10,

          Bortle: Red, suburban (SQM 17.34 NELM 4.8m)

Info:     Over 50 light-years across, Caroline's Rose spans about half a degree in the sky (the angular size of the moon). Its loops of stars and dark lanes look like the swirling pattern of rose petals as seen from above. The many red giant stars gives the cluster a yellowish cast, like a haystack

 

 

     It’s a mild mid-September late summer evening, with a 11 day (89%) moon up at 18° Alt in Capricornus. The NELM is also up around 4.8m (SQM 17.4), so I choose an open cluster close to zenith as my first target tonight : NGC 7789 (Caroline’s White Rose / Haystack) in Cassiopeia.

    

     Caroline’s Haystack is easily located 3° SW of Beta CAS; It shows up in my 10x56mm Bino as a faint, round hazy spot, midway between a pair of 6m stars to the N and a triangle of 6m stars to the S. Clicking up the magnification to 60x (CZJ O-16mm), the OC is seen in my 80mm refractor as a 9’ large, round nebulosity with a handful of 11m stars resolved in the center plus countless more glimmering just below resolution, with a slight concentration in a triangular core  :

 

R005-O16 BlackCropS.jpg

 

Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 18 September 2016 - 08:26 AM.

  • photiost and Sasa like this

#24 AllanDystrup

AllanDystrup

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,699
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2012
  • Loc: 56N 12E, Denmark

Posted 18 September 2016 - 08:16 AM

Caroline’s White Rose OC -- Continued

 

     When switching to the R2 ccd/lcd for 110x @ 0.3° FOV, the cluster core resolves into a swarm of 13m-14m stellar points, with small groups of brighter (~12m) stars arranged in a N-S pattern, as a ”Needle” in the Haystack. An almost 3D view, very nice!

 

R005-R2 BlackCropS.jpg

 

Allan

 


  • photiost and Sasa like this

#25 Organic Astrochemist

Organic Astrochemist

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 988
  • Joined: 10 Jan 2015

Posted 18 September 2016 - 01:30 PM

Allan, great reports and sketches.

While I was out observing clusters in Cassiopeia with my 8", I captured this image of NGC6781 in H-alpha with my 6". Maybe this shows a little of what O'Meara called "Ghost of the moon." 

 

NGC 6781 Ha cropped.jpg

 

When observing open clusters, in addition to the wide field, low magnification view of the whole cluster, I like to crank up the magnification and see as many faint and close stars as possible. There is lots to see in the center of the field of view in your visual sketch of NGC 457, for example. Some of these stars have been classified as double stars in obscure, neglected catalogs such as BKO (Ladanyi & Berko). There are challenges for every instrument.

 

Allan, I'm curious as to your maximum useful magnification/image scale with your system, both visual and EAA. I'm not sure what your 1.7x GPC is, but I assume you could adjust the focal length/imaging scale for your R2.


  • denis0007dl and AllanDystrup like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: beginner, classic, dso, EAA, observing, refractor



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics