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Question about drives

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#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 18 March 2004 - 11:09 PM

Hello...I was looking at the Orion 127 mm Maks and Orion sells it with 1 drive and with 2 drives for about $50 more on the Skyview Pro mount. I was wondering what the second drive would buy me. I understand the Right Acension drive but what is the Declination drive for?

Also, in the Southern states would dew be a big problem on these scopes?

Thanks,

Matt
Orion 10x50 binoculars

#2 Steve Landry

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Posted 18 March 2004 - 11:23 PM

Hi Matt,

I had the 127Mak for awhile up here in Seattle, and Dew was a problem after a couple of hours.

I grew up in South LA (Louisiana, NOT Los Angeles!) and if I remember correctly, dew would be a fairly big concern. Others that live there now can give you more detail.

Cheers! :grin:
Steve

#3 Scott Beith

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 06:54 AM

Hi Matt,
The EQ mounts are tilted to compensate for the Earth's rotation. The single axis drive could be considered "left - right" control on a tilt. The double axis drive would add the "up - down" aspect of aiming the telescope. This would allow for total pushbutton control of the scope.
I own the Starmax 127, and with the Orion Flexishield on the OTA, it has never dewed up and this is in South MS.
Without the dewshield, I think that dew would definitely be an issue.

Scott

#4 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 12:35 PM

Scott, Steve,

Thanks for the info. When I get something I'll definitely get the dewshield.

One more quick question. Do these scopes have "cool up" times. In other words, if my house is air condidtioned at 76 degrees and I go out into the 90 degree night in Texas, does that still affect the scope until it is stabilized.

Thanks,

Matt

Matt

#5 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 12:49 PM

One more quick question. Do these scopes have "cool up" times. In other words, if my house is air condidtioned at 76 degrees and I go out into the 90 degree night in Texas, does that still affect the scope until it is stabilized.


Thermal instability is thermal instability...any change in temperature between inside/outside will cause the problem. It's more of an issue in winter because the temperature can drop steadily during the night, so that the scope never "catches up." In the summer, nighttime temps more closely resemble indoor air-conditioned daytime temps, so it's less of an issue.

#6 Suk Lee

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 02:06 PM

In the summer, nighttime temps more closely resemble indoor air-conditioned daytime temps, so it's less of an issue.


:roflmao: That's an understatement. I grew up in Canada, so I'm used to the cold. Then I ended up in Dallas for a while. 76 degrees inside with the air conditioning running full blast. 97 degrees outside at midnight. Me outside with sweat dripping off me thinking "WHAT am I doing???".

Got chased by an armadillo one night. Moved.

Suk

#7 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 19 March 2004 - 07:56 PM

I have a pet Armadillo named Toby....Just kidding.

Matt


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