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Spacewalker 8x42 binoculars - any experience yet?

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#1 C.Hay

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 05:17 AM

Hi folks, has anyone had any experience yet of the Spacewalker 8x42 binoculars?

 

I've been wondering about suitable objects to frame with this near-far technique. I reckon the Moon may make sense: put it at near and see it float in the foreground - might give a fresh appreciation of depth of field. Ditto planets if I can isolate them sufficiently from star fields. Framing globulars at far in a scope with the LOA 21 eyepieces will also be exciting, I imagine, but that is hardly the territory of 8x42 bins. In Milky Way star fields, I expect I would find the shifting of distances as I pan around outright irritating - but that's just speculation.

 

So, any experience anyone?

Christopher



#2 edwincjones

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 05:30 AM

good question
 
all that speculation, then they came out, and not much
 
in contrast to the 2.1x42 there was a lot of joy after release
 
what about it-3D users  ?
 
edj

Edited by edwincjones, 13 September 2016 - 05:34 AM.


#3 Mark9473

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 06:43 AM

http://www.cloudynig...a-3d-binocular/


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#4 nickatnight

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 07:28 AM

We are busy floating in space.  :lol:

 

I can describe my dreams, but they are better first hand, as are these 3D binoculars.


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#5 John Gauvreau

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 07:51 AM

Hi Christopher,

 

I have had a chance to try out the 8x42 binos.  First, I can't say enough good things about Russ Lederman and his innovative approach, excellent customer service and the quality of his products (I have no association with Denkmeier).

 

However, looking through the binoculars is a very unique experience, and I would recommend that you make every effort to try them out before purchasing.  The 3-D illusion is clear and effective, but might not be to everyone's taste.  Many people, from what I have read and from what I saw as others tried the binoculars, really enjoy the effect, but it is not universal and, as I said, a matter of taste.  Kind of like how 3D movies are now very popular, but some people still prefer the traditional 2d images on the screen.

 

As for suitable targets, a strong, easily identified target works best.  Star clusters, like the Alpha Persei Association worked really well.  I scanned around and found the effect of objects moving forward and back to be not troubling at all.  I tried moving the Andromeda Galaxy into the background, and found the effect to be less distinct than when objects are moved forward in the view.  I did not get a chance to try it on the moon (new moon weekend). 


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#6 SMark

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 03:09 PM

I really like mine. Really dark skies will enhance the views, but I wouldn't go so far as to say it's necessary in order to enjoy the 3D views. Just a lot of extra fun under the night sky.



#7 rowdy388

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 03:20 PM

Hi Christopher,

 

I have had a chance to try out the 8x42 binos.  First, I can't say enough good things about Russ Lederman and his innovative approach, excellent customer service and the quality of his products (I have no association with Denkmeier).

 

However, looking through the binoculars is a very unique experience, and I would recommend that you make every effort to try them out before purchasing.  The 3-D illusion is clear and effective, but might not be to everyone's taste.  Many people, from what I have read and from what I saw as others tried the binoculars, really enjoy the effect, but it is not universal and, as I said, a matter of taste.  Kind of like how 3D movies are now very popular, but some people still prefer the traditional 2d images on the screen.

 

As for suitable targets, a strong, easily identified target works best.  Star clusters, like the Alpha Persei Association worked really well.  I scanned around and found the effect of objects moving forward and back to be not troubling at all.  I tried moving the Andromeda Galaxy into the background, and found the effect to be less distinct than when objects are moved forward in the view.  I did not get a chance to try it on the moon (new moon weekend). 

Yes, what John said.  Nice post.  I've had my pair for about two months now and have taken them out under the stars several times.  Also several of my

club members have had a peek with them.  They work as advertised and the effect is excellent.  The busier the star field, the more dramatic the views

become.  I saw the  Pleiades rising in the east for the first time with these last week and thought it was stunning.  The entire plane along the Milky Way

from Sagittarius to Auriga is a treat.  Everyone had fun with them so far but as others have stated some are bound to like the effect more than others

and some may dislike it.  I think most people can rely on their intuition here: if they think they will like it, they probably will and if not, then they won't!


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#8 Philip Levine

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 04:31 PM

Hi Christopher,

I had the chance to use my 3 D Spacewalker 8 x 42 binos earlier this month while up in dark sky Maine, near Moosehead Lake.

I really enjoyed using these binoculars, I had several different pairs of binos with me this trip, but found myself returning to use the 3D 8 x 42 Spacewalkers.

I agree with the comment from John , I also found the star clusters in Perseus provided very dramatic views.  Yes, Alpha Persei is outstanding.  Melotte 20 looks like an "ET" Octopus with a lit finger, the 3 D array makes this cluster pop out in layers, very dramatic.  Also very impressive was the Double Cluster and "Muscleman" in Perseus.  Kemble's Cascade in Camelopardaris also looked impressive. The Pleiades looked very nice, but not as dramatic as other open clusters.  In general, scanning the Milky Way was very nice.

I'm glad I purchased the 3 D Spacewalker binos, and will be sure to share the view with others at upcoming Star Parties.

Phil


Edited by Philip Levine, 13 September 2016 - 06:29 PM.

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#9 faackanders2

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 09:27 PM

Start with the Milkyway, and areas with lots of bright Stars:  Perseus A, Hyades, M45, M44, etc.



#10 Denkmeier,Inc.

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 09:37 PM

Over 100 shipped. Only One returned. He said in advance he doesn't pass depth perception tests at the eye doctor. So, he tried. He experienced No perception of depth.
As far as banter goes, maybe it is radically different and the folks that are seeing the night sky in 3D are a bit aprehensive about posting their approval. I was surprised and a bit taken aback at the level of conjecture and doubt expressed by those who haven't looked through the 3D Eyepieces or The Space Walkers. I approached the observer's quest for immersive views in a radically different way ; rather than wider true and apparant fields of view, this technology gets you OUT THERE in a very aesthetic and involving way.
But as I stated, 100+ sold, 1 return. To me that's not a "some may like it, others may not'" thing. I am making 200 more in response to the universal acceptance by open minded observers. I thank you all.
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#11 daniel_h

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 11:11 PM

Over 100 shipped. Only One returned.

I smell an open box special [with the cost of overseas postage need all the help we can get]

 

though i presume would violate TOS to enquire of it


Edited by daniel_h, 13 September 2016 - 11:16 PM.


#12 hallelujah

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 11:26 PM

 

Over 100 shipped. Only One returned.

I smell an open box special [with the cost of overseas postage need all the help we can get]

though i presume would violate TOS to enquire of it

How about a PM?



#13 edwincjones

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 07:13 AM

unhappy owners should be putting them up on Ebay, S&S, Classified, AM by now,  but NONE found


Edited by edwincjones, 14 September 2016 - 07:18 AM.

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#14 rowdy388

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 08:44 AM

Mine aren't for sale!  A cool effect with these binos is that when focusing on the background stars whatever is in the foreground array

pops out further in peripheral vision enhancing the overall 3-D view.  Faint targets just pop...don't know how to describe it any better.



#15 faackanders2

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 08:53 PM

 

 

Over 100 shipped. Only One returned.

I smell an open box special [with the cost of overseas postage need all the help we can get]

though i presume would violate TOS to enquire of it

How about a PM?

 

Why would anyone want to sell an unopened one, when they could get a full refund for returning?

 

If you don't want to buy a new one, you will have to wait till there is a used one (and with no competition that may be a long wait).



#16 TH1

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Posted 18 September 2016 - 05:34 PM

Somebody wrote a fantastic review on amazon with some good tips. Sounds legit.

#17 Mike G.

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Posted 18 September 2016 - 10:08 PM

I've had mine for 3 months or so. Took them to a star party a couple weeks ago and let some friends look through them without telling them what they were - talk about fun!  Very dramatic reactions from people.  Most common was, 'what are these things?!?!'  They seem to work best with big star fields like the MW but I particularly like looking at big globs, M31 and open clusters.  Since I am known for always dragging lots of stuff with me when I go out, these are particularly handy since 8x42's don't really add much to the load.
I have no intention of selling mine, ever.  If you don't have some yet, you need to get on the list.



#18 stargazer193857

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 01:31 AM

Point the barrels slightly apart. The right eye sees it to the left, and the left I to the right. Both eyes look inward to merge the image. You then get the 3D effect, but no depth perception of individual stars relative to each other. Someone dropped his skymasters and got an idea.



#19 stargazer193857

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 01:32 AM

If your eyes are far apart, put the eyepieces closer together. Maybe you will get a similar effect.



#20 hakann

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 04:55 AM

So hows optics for less than 300 bucks at 42 mm whit roof and ED glass. Add that upp to smaller batches aswell made.
It look like all good, can't find a single critics on the bino, that tells me it might be world class optics and product.
Must try one !

#21 TH1

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 08:26 AM

I particularly like looking at quarter and sliver moons as the LOA 21 are not moon, so you get a moon option. Not any one part of the moon really but the shadowed moon in relation to the stars.

#22 Denkmeier,Inc.

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 08:27 AM

Point the barrels slightly apart. The right eye sees it to the left, and the left I to the right. Both eyes look inward to merge the image. You then get the 3D effect, but no depth perception of individual stars relative to each other. Someone dropped his skymasters and got an idea.



#23 Denkmeier,Inc.

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 08:42 AM

If offsetting an entire field (right or left) in relation to the opposite field worked and produced noticable 3D/depth perception, then I'd have done this with binoviewers years ago. It does not have any effect on targets at infinity focus. Its a wash.
When I got serious about doing the 3D, i brought two binoviewers to a local gathering. One was aligned dead on in verticle and horizontal. The other dead on in vertcle, offset in horizontal. I did a blind test on the observers. I asked them to view an open cluster with each unit. Did they notice anything different? "No" .....finally, Did they see any enhanced sense of 3D? "No". Dang. My job would have been easy had it worked. I have been asked rarely by a very few if I offset my binoviewers in horizontal alignment. I do not.

Certainly, binocular objectices set at wider angles from one another increase the level of depth perception but only for viewing objects inside of infinity focus. As The distance between objectives increases, the distance where depth perception is experienced increases. But this stops at relatively close terrestrial distances and again, the view becomes flat betond that.

As far as night sky viewing goes, my array is reproducing the exact experience of everyday depth perception. The optical/neurological experiences of the two are identical.

Starlight in small areas of the field pass through either the original unit field, or through various panels that displace those field areas right, left, more, less. The affect is that instant immediate depth perception kicks in! The patent pending array only needs to be in one eyepiece. The optics are finely figured at lambda 10 and dielectric coated and cemented using a proprietary method.
Amazingly, in the LOA21 Eyepieces, rotating the eyepiece 180 degrees reverses distances instantly. Whatever appeared closest (center of the field) now appears furthest. This is because the direction of deplacement is reversed and is interpreted by the brain to be closer or further. Amazing! The array is attached to one eyepiece when used in a binoviewer. The array is part of The Space Walker 3D Binocular so this feature is absent. But in the LOA eyepiece, my instructions are taylored to keeping the eyepiece with the array in the right side. If it us placed in the ledt side of the binoviewer, the distances again are flipped! Think of your nose as center. Shift one object in a dual field merge to outside, it appears forward in relation to non shifted objects in merged dual field. Move it inward, it appears more distant. The mind is fascinating!

Russ

Edited by Denkmeier,Inc., 19 September 2016 - 09:10 AM.


#24 TH1

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 07:33 PM

The binos work great for white light solar. Jet black sky around the disk. Not really any 3D but they work! So the whole night sky, sliver and quarter moons, and white light!

Can you say Aug '17?

#25 jrbarnett

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 11:24 PM

Hi folks, has anyone had any experience yet of the Spacewalker 8x42 binoculars?

 

I've been wondering about suitable objects to frame with this near-far technique. I reckon the Moon may make sense: put it at near and see it float in the foreground - might give a fresh appreciation of depth of field. Ditto planets if I can isolate them sufficiently from star fields. Framing globulars at far in a scope with the LOA 21 eyepieces will also be exciting, I imagine, but that is hardly the territory of 8x42 bins. In Milky Way star fields, I expect I would find the shifting of distances as I pan around outright irritating - but that's just speculation.

 

So, any experience anyone?

Christopher

Yes they are cool as heck.

 

Bill P brought a pair camping with my club at the beginning of August,

 

You can read a bit about them here:

 

http://www.cloudynig...xperience-r3067

 

For my part, the "3D" effect was most pronounced on the billowing star clouds of the summer Milky Way; they looked like bunched cotton balls.  

 

But I don't know how well the 3D binos would do under poorer conditions like I have here in the 'burbs.

 

Regards,

 

Jim


Edited by jrbarnett, 28 September 2016 - 11:27 PM.

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