Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

DSO's that have color...

  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Keith Rivich

Keith Rivich

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1708
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2011
  • Loc: Cypress, Tx

Posted 16 December 2016 - 11:21 PM

In another thread discussing colors in DSO's Dave Mitsky posted this excellent list of colorful objects. I thought it would be fun to have others expand on this list with their own colorful observed objects. This will create a list that veteran and novice alike can tackle and take a break from the same old grey-green DSO's. If you want to add an object copy and paste the list to a new page and add your object to the end. My opinion, keep quiet on what color you see at least for now. Let each observer discover the color on their own. In my second opinion multiple stars are ok to add, as long as they have color!

 

 

M08 Sgr                  18 03.8    -24° 23' 5.8                   Lagoon Nebula
M20 Sgr                  18 02.6    -23° 02' 6.3                   Trifid Nebula
M27 Vul                   19 59.6    +22° 43' 7.3                   Dumbbell Nebula
M42 Ori                   05 35.4    -05° 27' 4.0                   Orion Nebula
NGC 40 Cep           00 13.0    +72° 31' 12.4               Bow Tie Nebula
NGC 1535 Eri         04 14.3     -12° 44' 9.6                 Cleopatra's Eye
NGC 2392 Gem     07 29.2     +20° 55' 7.4                 Eskimo Nebula
NGC 3242 Hya      10 24.8     +18° 38' 7.8                Ghost of Jupiter
NGC 6210 Her      16 44.5     +23° 49' 8.8                  Turtle Nebula
NGC 6369 Oph     17 29.3     -23° 46' 11.4                Little Ghost Nebula
NGC 6445 Sgr      17 49.3      -20° 01' 11.2
NGC 6543 Dra      17 58.6     +66° 38' 8.1                Cat's Eye Nebula
NGC 6572 Oph     18 12.1     +06° 51' 9.1               Emerald Nebula
NGC 6818 Sgr      19 44.0     -14° 09' 9.3                Little Gem Nebula
NGC 6826 Cyg     19 44.8     +50° 31' 8.8               Blinking Nebula
NGC 6891 Del      20 15.2     +12° 42' 10.5
NGC 7009 Aqr     21 04.2     -11° 22' 8.3                 Saturn Nebula
NGC 7662 And    23 25.9      +42° 33' 8.3              Blue Snowball Nebula
IC 418 Lep            05 27.5     +12° 42' 9.3              Raspberry Nebula


Edited by Keith Rivich, 16 December 2016 - 11:37 PM.

  • Procyon, Interlude, clintmk89 and 1 other like this

#2 petert913

petert913

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3374
  • Joined: 27 May 2013
  • Loc: Portland, OR

Posted 16 December 2016 - 11:23 PM

I like the red splash that comes out of M82 if you photograph it correctly.



#3 Keith Rivich

Keith Rivich

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1708
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2011
  • Loc: Cypress, Tx

Posted 16 December 2016 - 11:24 PM

For my first addition to Dave's list I am adding NGC 6905 to to the list.

 

 

M08 Sgr                  18 03.8    -24° 23' 5.8                   Lagoon Nebula
M20 Sgr                  18 02.6    -23° 02' 6.3                   Trifid Nebula
M27 Vul                   19 59.6    +22° 43' 7.3                   Dumbbell Nebula
M42 Ori                   05 35.4    -05° 27' 4.0                   Orion Nebula
NGC 40 Cep           00 13.0    +72° 31' 12.4               Bow Tie Nebula
NGC 1535 Eri         04 14.3     -12° 44' 9.6                 Cleopatra's Eye
NGC 2392 Gem     07 29.2     +20° 55' 7.4                 Eskimo Nebula
NGC 3242 Hya      10 24.8     +18° 38' 7.8                Ghost of Jupiter
NGC 6210 Her      16 44.5     +23° 49' 8.8                  Turtle Nebula
NGC 6369 Oph     17 29.3     -23° 46' 11.4                Little Ghost Nebula
NGC 6445 Sgr      17 49.3      -20° 01' 11.2
NGC 6543 Dra      17 58.6     +66° 38' 8.1                Cat's Eye Nebula
NGC 6572 Oph     18 12.1     +06° 51' 9.1               Emerald Nebula
NGC 6818 Sgr      19 44.0     -14° 09' 9.3                Little Gem Nebula
NGC 6826 Cyg     19 44.8     +50° 31' 8.8               Blinking Nebula
NGC 6891 Del      20 15.2     +12° 42' 10.5
NGC 7009 Aqr     21 04.2     -11° 22' 8.3                 Saturn Nebula
NGC 7662 And    23 25.9      +42° 33' 8.3              Blue Snowball Nebula
IC 418 Lep            05 27.5     +12° 42' 9.3              Raspberry Nebula

NGC 6905 Del      20 22 23   +20 06 16                 The Blue Flash


  • j.gardavsky likes this

#4 Keith Rivich

Keith Rivich

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1708
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2011
  • Loc: Cypress, Tx

Posted 16 December 2016 - 11:25 PM

I like the red splash that comes out of M82 if you photograph it correctly.

Not fair! Foul! This is for visual  :mad:

 

:D


  • CounterWeight, nevy and clusterbuster like this

#5 chrysalis

chrysalis

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 19827
  • Joined: 10 Aug 2013
  • Loc: North Central NC

Posted 17 December 2016 - 05:25 AM

Most high surface brightness PNs will show color in my experience.

 

You asked for it: Double Stars with color.

 

Attached File  Double Stars Color Contrast.pdf   60KB   77 downloads

 

Attached File  DOUBLE STARS WITH SIGNIFICANT COLOR CONTRAST.doc   27KB   58 downloads

 

Attached File  DoubleStars Colorful.xls   43KB   36 downloads

 

Attached File  Double Star List2.pdf   25.5KB   34 downloads

 

Of course this link I started way long ago:

 

http://www.cloudynig...ublesmultiples/

 

76 Red Stars List:

 

http://www.1000plus.com/redstars.htm

 

 



#6 hbanich

hbanich

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1274
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2005
  • Loc: Sandy, Oregon

Posted 19 December 2016 - 12:32 AM

The red ring of Campbell's Hydrogen star (PK 64+5.1).


  • j.gardavsky likes this

#7 Tony Flanders

Tony Flanders

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 17040
  • Joined: 18 May 2006
  • Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA

Posted 19 December 2016 - 05:29 AM

If stars are allowed, then carbon stars are the most obvious answer. Unlike any of the nebulae mentioned, they have deep, saturated reds -- the kind of color that nobody could mistake. Most newbies, presented with any of the nebulae in the base list, would say at first glance that they're not colored at all.


  • Sarkikos, CounterWeight, kfiscus and 1 other like this

#8 kfiscus

kfiscus

    Baltic Birch Dob Bases

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 6611
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2012
  • Loc: Albert Lea, MN, USA

Posted 20 December 2016 - 08:21 AM

If stars are allowed, then carbon stars are the most obvious answer. Unlike any of the nebulae mentioned, they have deep, saturated reds -- the kind of color that nobody could mistake. Most newbies, presented with any of the nebulae in the base list, would say at first glance that they're not colored at all.


Beat me to it. They can be shockingly colorful, especially by our standards.

#9 jeffmac

jeffmac

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 762
  • Joined: 01 Aug 2014
  • Loc: Triad area, NC

Posted 21 December 2016 - 08:48 PM



I sometimes see the Rosette Nebula with a reddish cast. I say sometimes because it seems like my eyes don't always see the red color. One night the red cast was easily visible in my 15x70s, unfiltered.

#10 David Knisely

David Knisely

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16961
  • Joined: 19 Apr 2004
  • Loc: southeastern Nebraska

Posted 22 December 2016 - 09:15 PM

Most high surface brightness PNs will show color in my experience.

 

You asked for it: Double Stars with color.

 

attachicon.gifDouble Stars Color Contrast.pdf

 

attachicon.gifDOUBLE STARS WITH SIGNIFICANT COLOR CONTRAST.doc

 

attachicon.gifDoubleStars Colorful.xls

 

attachicon.gifDouble Star List2.pdf

 

Of course this link I started way long ago:

 

http://www.cloudynig...ublesmultiples/

 

76 Red Stars List:

 

http://www.1000plus.com/redstars.htm

 

It might be nice to give maybe just a little credit to at least one of the sources you posted.

 

COMMON DOUBLE STARS WITH SIGNIFICANT COLOR CONTRAST
            (positions, separations, and position angles for 2000)

LEGEND: R.A. = Right Ascension (2000.0)  Dec. = Declination
mag. = apparent visual magnitude   sp. = spectral type
Sep. = separation (in arc seconds)   P.A. = position angle
********************************************************************

Otto Struve (STT) 254, R.A. 0h 1.3m  Dec. +60d 21.3'
Primary: mag. 7.2~ (variable) Sp. C5p, Secondary mag. 8.3, sp. A
Sep. 58" arc, P.A. 90 deg. (multiple optical double)
Colors seen in 10 inch: deep reddish-orange and bluish-white.
(primary is Carbon star WZ Cas, other stars also nearby)

 

Sturve 3053, R.A. 0h 2.6m  Dec. +66d 6.0'
Primary: mag. 5.9, sp. G9III, Secondary mag. 7.3, sp. A1V
Sep. 15.0" arc, P.A. 70 deg. 
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and pale bluish.

 

Eta Cassiopeiae, R.A. 0h 49.10m  Dec. +57d 49.0'
Primary: mag. 3.4, sp. G0V, Secondary: mag. 7.5, sp. dM0
Sep. 12.8" arc, P.A. 317 deg. (period: 480 years)
Colors seen in 10 inch: Off-white and faint reddish-orange.

 

ALMACH (Gamma And.), R.A. 2h 3.90m  Dec. +42d 19.8'
Primary: mag. 2.2 sp. K3III, Secondary: mag. 4.8 sp. B8V
Sep. 9.8" arc, P.A. 64 deg. (mag. 6.3 companion of Gamma-B at 0.4" arc,
p.a. 103 deg., closing separation).
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow (Gold) and light blue.

 

6 Triangulae (Struve 227), R.A. 2h 12.37m Dec. +30d. 18.3'
Primary: mag. 4.9, Sp. G5III, Secondary: mag. 6.5, Sp. F6V
Sep. 3.9" arc, P.A. 69 deg.
Colors seen in 9.25" SCT: Yellowish-white and bluish-white.

 

32 Eridani, R.A. 3h 54.29m  Dec. -2d 57.3'
Primary: mag. 4.5, sp. G8III, Secondary: mag. 6.1, sp. A2V
Sep. 6.9" arc, P.A. 348 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and pale blue.

 

15 Geminorum, R.A. 6h 27.8m Dec. +20d 47.3'
Primary: mag. 4.6, sp. K0, Secondary: mag. 8.5, sp. G0
Sep. 6.9" arc, P.A. 64 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-orange and white.

 

Psi-5 Aurigae, R.A. 6h 46.75m  Dec. +43d 34.6'
Primary: Mag. 5.3 sp. G0V, Secondary: mag. 8.5 sp. M0V
Sep. 31.1" arc, P.A. 38 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Off-white and faint orange.

 

38 Geminorum (STF 982), R.A. 6h 54.64m  Dec. +13d 10.7'
Primary: mag. 4.7, sp. A8/F0V, Secondary: mag. 7.7, sp. G6V
Sep. 7.1" arc, P.A. 144 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: White and faint orangish.

 

h3945 (ADS 5951, CMa), R.A. 7h 16.61m  Dec. -23d 18.9'
Primary: mag. 4.8 sp. K4III,  Secondary: mag. 6.8, sp. A5
Sep. 26.6" arc, P.A. 55 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Orange and bluish-white.
"The Winter Albireo"

 

S 548 (ADS 6087, Gem), R.A. 7h 27.7m  Dec. +22d 8.0'
Primary: mag. 6.9 sp. K5, Secondary mag. 8.9 sp. ?
Sep. 35.5" arc, P.A. 277 deg.
Colors: Orangish and bluish

 

Iota Cancri, R.A. 8h 46.70m  Dec. +28d 45.6'
Primary: mag. 4.0 sp. G8II, Secondary: mag. 6.6 sp. A3V
Sep. 30.5" arc, P.A. 307 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Light yellow and pale blue.

 

Tau Leonis, R.A. 11h 27.94m  Dec. +2d 51.3'
Primary: mag. 4.9 sp. G8Iab, Secondary: mag. 7.4 sp. G5
Sep. 89.7' arc, P.A. 180 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and white.
*nice low power pair with double 83 Leonis 20' at P.A. 298 deg.

 

2 Canum Venaticorum, R.A. 12h 16.13m  Dec. +40d 39.6'
Primary: mag. 5.7, sp. M1III, Secondary: mag. 8.7, sp. F7V
Sep. 11.3" arc, P.A. 260 deg (2003).
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-orange and pale bluish-white.

 

24 Comae Berenices, R.A. 12h 35.13m  Dec. +18d 22.6'
Primary: mag. 5.0 sp. K2III, Secondary: mag. 6.6 sp. A7V
Sep. 20.3" arc, P.A. 271 deg.

Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and pale blue.

 

Cor Caroli (Alpha CVn), R.A. 12h 56.00m  Dec. +38d 19.1'
Primary: mag. 2.9 sp. A0spe, Secondary: mag. 5.6, sp. F0V
Sep. 18.8" arc, P.A. 230 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Bluish-white and off-white (cream).

 

Izar (Epsilon Bootis), R.A. 14h 44.99m Dec. +27d 4.5'
Primary: mag. 2.4 sp. K0II,  Secondary: mag. 5.1, sp. A2V
Sep. 2.8" arc P.A. 339 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and light blue.

 

Xi Bootis, R.A. 14h 51.39m  Dec. +19d 6.0'
Primary: mag. 4.5, sp. G8V, Secondary: mag. 6.8, sp. K5V
Sep. 6.8" arc P.A. 320 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Pale yellowish white and orange.

 

Antares (Alpha Sco).  R.A. 16h 29.41m  Dec. -26d 25.9'
Primary: mag. 1.0v sp. M1I,  Secondary: mag. 5.4 sp. B4
Sep. 2.6" arc P.A. 274 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Orange and light blue.

 

Ras Algethi (Alpha Her)  R.A. 17h 14.65m  Dec. +14d 23.4'
Primary: mag. 3.2v sp. M5II  Secondary: mag. 5.4, sp. F2/G3
Sep. 4.6" arc P.A. 104 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Reddish-orange and pale bluish-white.

 

95 Herculis.  R.A. 18h 1.5m  Dec. +21 deg. 36'
Primary: mag. 4.9, Sp. A5III, Secondary: Mag. 5.2 sp. G5?
Sep. 6.3" arc P.A. 256 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: pale bluish-white and gold.

 

59 Serpentis, R.A. 18h 27.2m  Dec. +0d 45.9'
Primary: mag. 5.2, Sp. GOIII, Secondary: mag. 7.4, sp. ?
Sep. 3.9" arc P.A. 320 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-white and pale bluish-white

 

Omicron Draconis, R.A. 18h 51.20m  Dec. +59d 23.3'
Primary: mag. 4.6, Sp. G9III, Secondary: mag. 8.1, sp. K3III
Sep. 36.5" arc P.A. 319 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and faint orangish

 

SHJ 282 (O. Struve 525), Lyra), R.A. 18h 54.90m  Dec. +33d 58.0'
Primary: mag. 6.1, sp. G8III  Secondary(s): mag. 9.1, sp. A8
B component Sep. 1.8" arc, P.A. 129 deg . (O. Str 525)
C component: mag. 7.7 Sp. A1, Sep. 45.4" arc P.A. 350 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-white and bluish-white.

 

Albireo (Beta Cyg)  19h 30.72m  Dec. +27d 57.6'
Primary: mag. 3.1 sp. K3II  Secondary: mag. 5.1 sp. B8V
Sep. 34.3" arc P.A. 54 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and light blue.

 

ADS 12900 (Cyg). 19h 45.86m  Dec. +35d 0.77'
Primary: mag. 6.1 sp. K2?  Secondary: mag. 8.6 sp. A2V
Sep. 37.5" arc  P.A. 25 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and blue.

 

Gamma Delphini, R.A. 20h 46.73m  Dec. +16 deg. 7.8'
Primary: mag. 4.4 sp. K1IV,  Secondary: mag. 5.0 sp. F7V.
Sep. 9.6" arc P.A. 268 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish and white (hint of blue)?

 

12 Aquari, R.A. 21h 4.1m  Dec. -5 deg. 49'
Primary: mag. 5.8 sp. G4III, Secondary: mag. 7.5 sp.?
Sep. 2.5" arc P.A. 196 deg. (2003)
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-white and pale bluish-white.

 

Delta Cephei  R.A. 22h 29.20m  Dec. +58d 25'
Prmary: mag. 4.07 (variable) sp. F5-G3  Secondary: mag. 6.27 sp. B7
Sep. 40.8" arc P.A. 191 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-white and light blue.

 

David W. Knisely, Prairie Astronomy Club


Edited by David Knisely, 22 December 2016 - 09:16 PM.

  • NochesNubladas likes this

#11 chrysalis

chrysalis

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 19827
  • Joined: 10 Aug 2013
  • Loc: North Central NC

Posted 22 December 2016 - 09:47 PM

 

Most high surface brightness PNs will show color in my experience.

 

You asked for it: Double Stars with color.

 

attachicon.gifDouble Stars Color Contrast.pdf

 

attachicon.gifDOUBLE STARS WITH SIGNIFICANT COLOR CONTRAST.doc

 

attachicon.gifDoubleStars Colorful.xls

 

attachicon.gifDouble Star List2.pdf

 

Of course this link I started way long ago:

 

http://www.cloudynig...ublesmultiples/

 

76 Red Stars List:

 

http://www.1000plus.com/redstars.htm

 

It might be nice to give maybe just a little credit to at least one of the sources you posted.

 

COMMON DOUBLE STARS WITH SIGNIFICANT COLOR CONTRAST
            (positions, separations, and position angles for 2000)

LEGEND: R.A. = Right Ascension (2000.0)  Dec. = Declination
mag. = apparent visual magnitude   sp. = spectral type
Sep. = separation (in arc seconds)   P.A. = position angle
********************************************************************

Otto Struve (STT) 254, R.A. 0h 1.3m  Dec. +60d 21.3'
Primary: mag. 7.2~ (variable) Sp. C5p, Secondary mag. 8.3, sp. A
Sep. 58" arc, P.A. 90 deg. (multiple optical double)
Colors seen in 10 inch: deep reddish-orange and bluish-white.
(primary is Carbon star WZ Cas, other stars also nearby)

 

Sturve 3053, R.A. 0h 2.6m  Dec. +66d 6.0'
Primary: mag. 5.9, sp. G9III, Secondary mag. 7.3, sp. A1V
Sep. 15.0" arc, P.A. 70 deg. 
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and pale bluish.

 

Eta Cassiopeiae, R.A. 0h 49.10m  Dec. +57d 49.0'
Primary: mag. 3.4, sp. G0V, Secondary: mag. 7.5, sp. dM0
Sep. 12.8" arc, P.A. 317 deg. (period: 480 years)
Colors seen in 10 inch: Off-white and faint reddish-orange.

 

ALMACH (Gamma And.), R.A. 2h 3.90m  Dec. +42d 19.8'
Primary: mag. 2.2 sp. K3III, Secondary: mag. 4.8 sp. B8V
Sep. 9.8" arc, P.A. 64 deg. (mag. 6.3 companion of Gamma-B at 0.4" arc,
p.a. 103 deg., closing separation).
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow (Gold) and light blue.

 

6 Triangulae (Struve 227), R.A. 2h 12.37m Dec. +30d. 18.3'
Primary: mag. 4.9, Sp. G5III, Secondary: mag. 6.5, Sp. F6V
Sep. 3.9" arc, P.A. 69 deg.
Colors seen in 9.25" SCT: Yellowish-white and bluish-white.

 

32 Eridani, R.A. 3h 54.29m  Dec. -2d 57.3'
Primary: mag. 4.5, sp. G8III, Secondary: mag. 6.1, sp. A2V
Sep. 6.9" arc, P.A. 348 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and pale blue.

 

15 Geminorum, R.A. 6h 27.8m Dec. +20d 47.3'
Primary: mag. 4.6, sp. K0, Secondary: mag. 8.5, sp. G0
Sep. 6.9" arc, P.A. 64 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-orange and white.

 

Psi-5 Aurigae, R.A. 6h 46.75m  Dec. +43d 34.6'
Primary: Mag. 5.3 sp. G0V, Secondary: mag. 8.5 sp. M0V
Sep. 31.1" arc, P.A. 38 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Off-white and faint orange.

 

38 Geminorum (STF 982), R.A. 6h 54.64m  Dec. +13d 10.7'
Primary: mag. 4.7, sp. A8/F0V, Secondary: mag. 7.7, sp. G6V
Sep. 7.1" arc, P.A. 144 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: White and faint orangish.

 

h3945 (ADS 5951, CMa), R.A. 7h 16.61m  Dec. -23d 18.9'
Primary: mag. 4.8 sp. K4III,  Secondary: mag. 6.8, sp. A5
Sep. 26.6" arc, P.A. 55 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Orange and bluish-white.
"The Winter Albireo"

 

S 548 (ADS 6087, Gem), R.A. 7h 27.7m  Dec. +22d 8.0'
Primary: mag. 6.9 sp. K5, Secondary mag. 8.9 sp. ?
Sep. 35.5" arc, P.A. 277 deg.
Colors: Orangish and bluish

 

Iota Cancri, R.A. 8h 46.70m  Dec. +28d 45.6'
Primary: mag. 4.0 sp. G8II, Secondary: mag. 6.6 sp. A3V
Sep. 30.5" arc, P.A. 307 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Light yellow and pale blue.

 

Tau Leonis, R.A. 11h 27.94m  Dec. +2d 51.3'
Primary: mag. 4.9 sp. G8Iab, Secondary: mag. 7.4 sp. G5
Sep. 89.7' arc, P.A. 180 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and white.
*nice low power pair with double 83 Leonis 20' at P.A. 298 deg.

 

2 Canum Venaticorum, R.A. 12h 16.13m  Dec. +40d 39.6'
Primary: mag. 5.7, sp. M1III, Secondary: mag. 8.7, sp. F7V
Sep. 11.3" arc, P.A. 260 deg (2003).
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-orange and pale bluish-white.

 

24 Comae Berenices, R.A. 12h 35.13m  Dec. +18d 22.6'
Primary: mag. 5.0 sp. K2III, Secondary: mag. 6.6 sp. A7V
Sep. 20.3" arc, P.A. 271 deg.

Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and pale blue.

 

Cor Caroli (Alpha CVn), R.A. 12h 56.00m  Dec. +38d 19.1'
Primary: mag. 2.9 sp. A0spe, Secondary: mag. 5.6, sp. F0V
Sep. 18.8" arc, P.A. 230 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Bluish-white and off-white (cream).

 

Izar (Epsilon Bootis), R.A. 14h 44.99m Dec. +27d 4.5'
Primary: mag. 2.4 sp. K0II,  Secondary: mag. 5.1, sp. A2V
Sep. 2.8" arc P.A. 339 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and light blue.

 

Xi Bootis, R.A. 14h 51.39m  Dec. +19d 6.0'
Primary: mag. 4.5, sp. G8V, Secondary: mag. 6.8, sp. K5V
Sep. 6.8" arc P.A. 320 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Pale yellowish white and orange.

 

Antares (Alpha Sco).  R.A. 16h 29.41m  Dec. -26d 25.9'
Primary: mag. 1.0v sp. M1I,  Secondary: mag. 5.4 sp. B4
Sep. 2.6" arc P.A. 274 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Orange and light blue.

 

Ras Algethi (Alpha Her)  R.A. 17h 14.65m  Dec. +14d 23.4'
Primary: mag. 3.2v sp. M5II  Secondary: mag. 5.4, sp. F2/G3
Sep. 4.6" arc P.A. 104 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Reddish-orange and pale bluish-white.

 

95 Herculis.  R.A. 18h 1.5m  Dec. +21 deg. 36'
Primary: mag. 4.9, Sp. A5III, Secondary: Mag. 5.2 sp. G5?
Sep. 6.3" arc P.A. 256 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: pale bluish-white and gold.

 

59 Serpentis, R.A. 18h 27.2m  Dec. +0d 45.9'
Primary: mag. 5.2, Sp. GOIII, Secondary: mag. 7.4, sp. ?
Sep. 3.9" arc P.A. 320 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-white and pale bluish-white

 

Omicron Draconis, R.A. 18h 51.20m  Dec. +59d 23.3'
Primary: mag. 4.6, Sp. G9III, Secondary: mag. 8.1, sp. K3III
Sep. 36.5" arc P.A. 319 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and faint orangish

 

SHJ 282 (O. Struve 525), Lyra), R.A. 18h 54.90m  Dec. +33d 58.0'
Primary: mag. 6.1, sp. G8III  Secondary(s): mag. 9.1, sp. A8
B component Sep. 1.8" arc, P.A. 129 deg . (O. Str 525)
C component: mag. 7.7 Sp. A1, Sep. 45.4" arc P.A. 350 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-white and bluish-white.

 

Albireo (Beta Cyg)  19h 30.72m  Dec. +27d 57.6'
Primary: mag. 3.1 sp. K3II  Secondary: mag. 5.1 sp. B8V
Sep. 34.3" arc P.A. 54 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and light blue.

 

ADS 12900 (Cyg). 19h 45.86m  Dec. +35d 0.77'
Primary: mag. 6.1 sp. K2?  Secondary: mag. 8.6 sp. A2V
Sep. 37.5" arc  P.A. 25 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellow and blue.

 

Gamma Delphini, R.A. 20h 46.73m  Dec. +16 deg. 7.8'
Primary: mag. 4.4 sp. K1IV,  Secondary: mag. 5.0 sp. F7V.
Sep. 9.6" arc P.A. 268 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish and white (hint of blue)?

 

12 Aquari, R.A. 21h 4.1m  Dec. -5 deg. 49'
Primary: mag. 5.8 sp. G4III, Secondary: mag. 7.5 sp.?
Sep. 2.5" arc P.A. 196 deg. (2003)
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-white and pale bluish-white.

 

Delta Cephei  R.A. 22h 29.20m  Dec. +58d 25'
Prmary: mag. 4.07 (variable) sp. F5-G3  Secondary: mag. 6.27 sp. B7
Sep. 40.8" arc P.A. 191 deg.
Colors seen in 10 inch: Yellowish-white and light blue.

 

David W. Knisely, Prairie Astronomy Club

 

Rectified for future David.



#12 clusterbuster

clusterbuster

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 727
  • Joined: 13 Mar 2016
  • Loc: Tampa Bay, Fl.

Posted 23 December 2016 - 06:39 AM

NGC 3242 is a beautiful color through my 14" Sky Watcher !

Mark

 



#13 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 82929
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 07 January 2017 - 01:02 AM

After observing Comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková, the blazar CTA 102, Venus, and the waxing Moon with the ASH 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain on Wednesday, I spent some time later on viewing carbon and binary stars and deep-sky objects. It was cold and quite windy that night but the transparency was rather good.

One of the DSOs that I observed was the planetary nebula NGC 2440 in Puppis. Somewhat to my surprise I saw a hint of color, a pale blue. I've observed NGC 2440 a number of times through various telescopes but don't remember it displaying color before.
 
http://www.skyhound....b/NGC_2440.html

Dave Mitsky



#14 GlennLeDrew

GlennLeDrew

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15849
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2008
  • Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Posted 07 January 2017 - 03:54 AM

The size of the object on the retina and its surface brightness as perceived are considerably important variables. Other factors such as contrast against the sky in terms of both brightness and color (in the latter respect, for skies sufficiently bright to have their color perceived) weigh in, too.

 

Generally speaking, for a smaller object of not particularly high surface brightness, a large aperture is a boon for it provides good image scale at a still reasonable brightness via a not-small exit pupil. Indeed, this fact has lead so many DSO observers to the false conclusion that the larger aperture *by itself* increases extended object surface brightness.


  • Dave Mitsky, Ernesto.Nicola and Bob4BVM like this

#15 makeshiftdevan

makeshiftdevan

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2016

Posted 07 January 2017 - 11:11 PM

 

If stars are allowed, then carbon stars are the most obvious answer. Unlike any of the nebulae mentioned, they have deep, saturated reds -- the kind of color that nobody could mistake. Most newbies, presented with any of the nebulae in the base list, would say at first glance that they're not colored at all.


Beat me to it. They can be shockingly colorful, especially by our standards.

 

Hi, I am one of the newbies that would like to ask how to see color in any nebula.  Currently, I have Orion's nebula at perfect viewing in the early evening and I am able to see it well, but no distinct color as I do with "near-by" Betelgeuse.  I am on an Orion XT 8 Plus (1200/6.0) Dob with a Meade 5000 UWA 14mm as my most used EP.  Any tips or directions on where to go for them are welcome!  


  • CounterWeight likes this

#16 GlennLeDrew

GlennLeDrew

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15849
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2008
  • Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Posted 08 January 2017 - 06:25 AM

For such a high surface brightness nebula as M42, you either see color or you don't. Even through light pollution the central region's surface brightness dominates. If you have a light pollution or nebula filter, this will suppress the sky's contribution of light, further isolating the green nebular light.

 

If that makes no improvement, try a planetary nebula known to present a prominent hue; the more compact form *might* result in the color being more apparent than for the much more spread out M42.


Edited by GlennLeDrew, 08 January 2017 - 06:28 AM.

  • chrysalis and Bob4BVM like this

#17 chrysalis

chrysalis

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 19827
  • Joined: 10 Aug 2013
  • Loc: North Central NC

Posted 08 January 2017 - 07:01 AM

For such a high surface brightness nebula as M42, you either see color or you don't. Even through light pollution the central region's surface brightness dominates. If you have a light pollution or nebula filter, this will suppress the sky's contribution of light, further isolating the green nebular light.

 

If that makes no improvement, try a planetary nebula known to present a prominent hue; the more compact form *might* result in the color being more apparent than for the much more spread out M42.

Glenn is quite right. NGC6543 presents a striking cyan color (or maybe leaning toward blue depending on the observer) in my 12", as do NGC7662, NGC6210, NGC6826, NGC6905, and several other somewhat compact but high surface brightness PNs. The PN IC418 presents a distinct strawberry color to my eye. 

 

Perhaps have a look at this link:

 

http://www.cloudynig...ae-spreadsheet/



#18 makeshiftdevan

makeshiftdevan

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2016

Posted 08 January 2017 - 06:07 PM

 

For such a high surface brightness nebula as M42, you either see color or you don't. Even through light pollution the central region's surface brightness dominates. If you have a light pollution or nebula filter, this will suppress the sky's contribution of light, further isolating the green nebular light.

 

If that makes no improvement, try a planetary nebula known to present a prominent hue; the more compact form *might* result in the color being more apparent than for the much more spread out M42.

Glenn is quite right. NGC6543 presents a striking cyan color (or maybe leaning toward blue depending on the observer) in my 12", as do NGC7662, NGC6210, NGC6826, NGC6905, and several other somewhat compact but high surface brightness PNs. The PN IC418 presents a distinct strawberry color to my eye. 

 

Perhaps have a look at this link:

 

http://www.cloudynig...ae-spreadsheet/

 

 

 

For such a high surface brightness nebula as M42, you either see color or you don't. Even through light pollution the central region's surface brightness dominates. If you have a light pollution or nebula filter, this will suppress the sky's contribution of light, further isolating the green nebular light.

 

If that makes no improvement, try a planetary nebula known to present a prominent hue; the more compact form *might* result in the color being more apparent than for the much more spread out M42.

Thanks for the replies! I will keep working to see the colors.  My guess is light pollution is keeping me back.  I will invest in a decent filter for this, and maybe an OIII (from the link).  



#19 Procyon

Procyon

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6480
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Eastern Canada

Posted 08 January 2017 - 09:30 PM

Interesting, thanks for all the targets guys.

#20 TiSaph

TiSaph

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 422
  • Joined: 24 Jan 2017

Posted 31 January 2017 - 09:49 PM

Great list, thanks!

#21 MikeRatcliff

MikeRatcliff

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2139
  • Joined: 12 Jun 2004
  • Loc: CA

Posted 20 September 2019 - 03:00 AM

The most intense planetary nebula I've seen is the "Blue Racquetball" NGC 6572. Small but intense. My astronomy color vision is declining, and that is one object I can still see color.
  • Darren Drake and CounterWeight like this

#22 Astro-Master

Astro-Master

    Messenger

  • ****-
  • Posts: 467
  • Joined: 09 May 2016

Posted 12 October 2019 - 10:28 PM

The most intense planetary nebula I've seen is the "Blue Racquetball" NGC 6572. Small but intense. My astronomy color vision is declining, and that is one object I can still see color.

NGC 6572 is one of the more colorful planetary nebulas.  40 years ago it looked bluish to my eye, but now at age 73 it looks green.  I think my eye lens has yellowed over the years, making blue look greenish.

 

On the Orion Nebula sometimes a premium low power eyepiece will show the color better.  The first time I used my 40mm Pentax XL with my 10" SCT from a dark site,       { Bortle 3 Zone } I saw green around the Trapezium area, and pale pinkish color on various parts of the nebula including M 43.  Some nights are better than others, a night with good transparency and low humidity is best for seeing color. 

 

Living in the San Diego area, I'm lucky to have the nice dark dry conditions of the Anza Borrego Desert as my observing spot.  Using my 18" Obsession from that site I usually see color in M 42 every time, and the view is mesmerizing in the 17 Ethos at 122x.


Edited by Astro-Master, 12 October 2019 - 10:30 PM.

  • havasman likes this

#23 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 82929
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 13 October 2019 - 10:52 AM

Campbell's Hydrogen Star (PK64+5.1, PNG 64.7+5.0, Henize 2-438) in Cygnus is another DSO that displays some color, in this case a ruddy hue.  It responds best to an H-beta filter.

https://www.cloudyni...ogen-star-r3156

 

http://bte999.jalbum...Ha-sG-OIII.html

https://www.sciences...pbells-92220131
 

https://www.prairiea...common-nebulae/

 

PK64+5.1 “CAMPBELL’S HYDROGEN STAR” Cygnus (Henize 2-438, PNG 64.7+5.0)
 

(10 inch f/5.6, 52x, 71x)
 

DEEP-SKY: (2) only slight increase in contrast (small nearly stellar disk, slightly reddish in color).
 

UHC:(3): Slight increase in contrast with faint outer shell hinted at.

 

OIII: (2) dimmer than UHC, but slightly more contrast than without filters.
 

H-BETA: (4) Noticeable increase in contrast with very faint outer shell.
 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PK64+5.1: H-BETA (UHC also useful).



#24 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 82929
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 13 October 2019 - 11:12 AM

The most intense planetary nebula I've seen is the "Blue Racquetball" NGC 6572. Small but intense. My astronomy color vision is declining, and that is one object I can still see color.

As has already been mentioned, NGC 6572 can also appear as green to some observers, hence the nickname the Emerald Nebula.

http://www.astronomy...nd-the-ink-spot

http://observing.sky...l/NGC_6572.html

 

Of the color of NGC 6572 Walter Scott Houston wrote, "My old 10-inch reflector showed the vivid green color of the object with any power more than 50x.  It is interesting to note that older observers have described NGC 6572 as green, while the younger ones tend to call it vivid blue."



#25 Bob4BVM

Bob4BVM

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1954
  • Joined: 23 Mar 2015
  • Loc: W. Oregon

Posted 13 October 2019 - 02:45 PM

Hi, I am one of the newbies that would like to ask how to see color in any nebula.  Currently, I have Orion's nebula at perfect viewing in the early evening and I am able to see it well, but no distinct color as I do with "near-by" Betelgeuse.  I am on an Orion XT 8 Plus (1200/6.0) Dob with a Meade 5000 UWA 14mm as my most used EP.  Any tips or directions on where to go for them are welcome!  

For me, M42 just begins to show hints of color in my 8" SCT, and that only on very good dark nights.  

The 17.5 shows color much more readily, especially the red tinges in the compact dust at the edges of the "wings"

Adding a BVer to the 8" makes the color (reds & greens) much less subtle but still requires a good night and careful observing.

 Adding a BVer to the 17.5" and the colors are obvious & striking to me, not to mention the detail/depth that the nebula takes on

One more thing I've found is that a good zoom EP is a great assist as it lets me dial in the best exit pupil & best background darkness for a given part of the nebula

CS

Bob


Edited by Bob4BVM, 13 October 2019 - 02:50 PM.



CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics