Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Dome Made of Paper ?

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
37 replies to this topic

#1 seefive

seefive

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2006

Posted 24 February 2006 - 11:55 AM

Here's a cool idea. I used paper(card board) as a base material for a 7ft. dome project.Easy to cut and glue, light weight, VERY cheap and insulating. Then coated it with fibre glass cloth and epoxy (West System) resin.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 840312-Paper Dome.jpg


#2 JAT Observatory

JAT Observatory

    NOT a Wimp

  • *****
  • Posts: 10185
  • Joined: 20 Feb 2005

Posted 24 February 2006 - 12:44 PM

Very nicely done!

#3 MMICKELS

MMICKELS

    Aluminum Knight

  • *****
  • Posts: 36071
  • Joined: 20 Jan 2004

Posted 24 February 2006 - 12:53 PM

Great idea!

#4 wrather1

wrather1

    AstroBear

  • *****
  • Posts: 4490
  • Joined: 25 Oct 2005

Posted 24 February 2006 - 12:54 PM

Where did you get your plans for the dome, or did you design/spec everything your own self???

:question:

#5 Rick Needham

Rick Needham

    Vendor (ExploraDome)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 1962
  • Joined: 20 Sep 2005

Posted 24 February 2006 - 01:09 PM

Wow! Great idea & it looks real good too! I'm assuming that one piece shutter door which lifts out is constructed of the same materials? How much would you estimate your completed dome to weigh? Once again, looks very nice. Oh...almost forgot the most important part of all. Welcome to the CN forums. :)

Rick

#6 seefive

seefive

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2006

Posted 24 February 2006 - 02:21 PM

Hey there, it started out as a model to check smiplicity of shapes. The "Gores" are only 2 different patterns, left and right reversed. My own concept. Had just completed a boat project and got some good experience with resin/cloth fabrication. Dome weight is about 17lbs each half. Thanks!

#7 seefive

seefive

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2006

Posted 24 February 2006 - 02:53 PM

Hey Rick; thanks for the thumbs up. Yep, the shutter is same process. Did you know that lbs for lbs corrigated cardboard is stronger than wood? Each dome half weighs in at about 17lbs, thats with epoxy resin! Cost for dome about 350 bucks. Turns from inside with one hand, rides in a channel with castors. Thanks for the interest, Greg

#8 kiwisailor

kiwisailor

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1280
  • Joined: 07 Jan 2004

Posted 26 February 2006 - 01:45 PM

Hey Greg, excellent idea and looks as though the execution has been done with excellence also :bow: :bow: :bow:

What about doing an article for CN's "How To" section, it would be a worthy addition.

Steve

#9 Scott Horstman

Scott Horstman

    Vendor - Backyard Observatories

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 14890
  • Joined: 11 Mar 2004

Posted 26 February 2006 - 10:47 PM

Very cool Greg! Looks like there should be a new acronim added along with ATM. How about AOM?

#10 rcg

rcg

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1437
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2005

Posted 26 February 2006 - 11:20 PM

Hey great idea, if you sell plans could be a lot more observatories popping up!! Welcome to CN.

#11 Pedro Scorza

Pedro Scorza

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 154
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2005

Posted 28 February 2006 - 09:18 PM

Nice dome, if you used corrugated cardboard, then you can substitute it by Coroplast can be cut and handled the same way but it is more durable.

#12 erik

erik

    telescope surgeon

  • *****
  • Posts: 24851
  • Joined: 30 Jan 2004

Posted 28 February 2006 - 09:54 PM

wow, great idea, and it looks awesome too! :)

#13 Paul WB

Paul WB

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 77
  • Joined: 10 Jan 2005

Posted 28 February 2006 - 11:15 PM

Interesting idea. I was thinking about using fibreglass as well, but using maisonite/hardboard underneath. How strong is this dome (e.g. snow weight, wind, etc.)? Neat idea!

#14 seefive

seefive

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2006

Posted 01 March 2006 - 12:00 PM

Hello Paul, I used the corrigated for two reasons. One I had a number of sheets laying around that I use for making shipping containers. Two, it is very light for its strength. Also just so easy to cut with box cutter. Glued parts with heat/glue/gun. Once the cloth and resin are added it becomes "Wicked" strong. Can drill holes etc. Masonite would work but heavier and more time consuming to cut.The total weight of the paper dome is less than 40lbs.Thanks for your input, Greg

#15 seefive

seefive

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2006

Posted 01 March 2006 - 12:09 PM

Hello Steve.\, Good thought about a CN article on the paperdome. I think I could do it, Greg

#16 seefive

seefive

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2006

Posted 01 March 2006 - 12:13 PM

Hello Bob, a set of plans is a nice idea, if I did I'd have to sell them for cost of shipping only. That's the ATM way! Greg.

#17 Paul WB

Paul WB

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 77
  • Joined: 10 Jan 2005

Posted 01 March 2006 - 10:14 PM

Hi Greg
Right now, I have wooden dome frame that I was planning to cover with maisonite and then with fibreglass. But, now I am intrigued with your idea of using card-board and fibreglass. I would be interested in any plans and detailed notes that you have. Thanks for sharing this idea with us Cloudy Nighters.
Paul WB

#18 Paul WB

Paul WB

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 77
  • Joined: 10 Jan 2005

Posted 01 March 2006 - 10:14 PM

Hi Greg
Right now, I have wooden dome frame that I was planning to cover with maisonite and then with fibreglass. But, now I am intrigued with your idea of using card-board and fibreglass. I would be interested in any plans and detailed notes that you have. Thanks for sharing this idea with us Cloudy Nighters.
Paul WB

#19 Pedro Scorza

Pedro Scorza

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 154
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2005

Posted 02 March 2006 - 08:34 AM

You can use corrugated plastic (coroplast) same easy handling and workability, only more durable and resilient
will be an excellent mod for the above design, maybe no need for glassing?

#20 Dragon Man

Dragon Man

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3257
  • Joined: 07 Mar 2006

Posted 10 March 2006 - 07:03 AM

Greg, what a fantastic and simple idea.

To the people that kindly suggested using Coroplast (corrugated plastic sheeting) and also known as Corflute here in Australia, it will have a disadvantage over the simpler corrugated cardboard. I was a fibreglass laminator for several years and had to study the properties and effects of Resins on different materials.

Resin by nature will not adhere properly to plastics. By using Coroplast, the resin will in time (if not immediately) seperate from the coroplast, and therefore, the resin and Coroplast will become two seperate entities reducing strength.

Whereas, corrugated cardboard has the benefit of being pourous which allows the resin to soak into the cardboard making it a permanent & integral part of the f/glass laminate, making it much stronger.

Another factor is in the domes internal painting process. Coroplast is hard to get paint to stick to, whereas cardboard can be painted easily.

Mainly because of the benefit from it's pourous nature being able to add to the strength, definately use the Cardboard!

Hope this helps.

Ken

#21 Pedro Scorza

Pedro Scorza

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 154
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2005

Posted 10 March 2006 - 10:04 AM

Ken, what you said about coroplast is true in its native state, but if you sand it lightly and them flash it with
mineral spirits, you then increases the surface bonding
potential markedly. I made a geodome observatory almost
3 years ago, so far no delamination of the glass epoxy skin.
The flashing procedure has been used for many years for model airplane building using coroplast, try it.

Pedro.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 862475-dome 3.JPG


#22 kiwisailor

kiwisailor

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1280
  • Joined: 07 Jan 2004

Posted 10 March 2006 - 01:29 PM

The flashing procedure has been used for many years for model airplane building using coroplast, try it.

I'd prefer not to take the risk of delamination, as Ken has pointed out, cardboard is going to become saturated with resin regardless of whether you use Polyesther or Epoxy, becoming a permanent part of the laminate.

Steve

#23 rboe

rboe

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 68420
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2002

Posted 10 March 2006 - 02:45 PM

Just to toss out an idea here; chickenwire and paper mache' (sp?) then epoxy over that. You could get compound curves (or a whale bone effect if you're not careful) and get away from the facetted look.

If you like the facetted look then door skins (1/8" thin veneer plywood) would be a good choice too. They are used on stitch & glue kayak kits - a proven track record of abuse.

#24 kiwisailor

kiwisailor

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1280
  • Joined: 07 Jan 2004

Posted 10 March 2006 - 05:52 PM

Just to toss out an idea here; chickenwire and paper mache' (sp?)

Actually, if you seal the paper mache with water proof paint it would be weather tight. In the early 19th Century rowing shells were made with the PM technique. A member of the local Astronomical Society has recently completed a home dome this way, I haven't seen it in the flesh but it appears to be standing up OK.

Sealing with Polyester/Epoxy and then applying a Gel coat would make it more durable though.

Steve

#25 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*
  • -----

Posted 10 March 2006 - 07:03 PM

I've posted this before, but it also seems relavent where this thread is heading.

I have a homebuilt hovercraft project that uses laminated sheets of closed-cell structural urethane foam. The sheets vary between 1/2" and 1" in thickness and have a density of 4 1/2 lbs/ft^3. It takes resin real well and is used to make cabin bulkheads in airliners.

The thinner sheets are flexible. If I was settled enough to build a dome, I would assemble plywood, longitudinal frames and hot-glue these sheets between them. If I didn't like that faceted look I would double up the material in the middle of each span and sand it round (it sands real easy). A layer of matt and cloth on the outside, just cloth on the inside and it would be practically indestructible.

Dan


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.







Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics