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Enhanced Vision Telescope Shown At CES

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#26 Jon_Doh

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 03:38 PM

Found a picture of it.

 

https://d.ibtimes.co...scope.jpg?w=400

 

It's a repainted NexStar 127SLT that happens to be bundled with an EAA camera of some kind that has the screen built in. This does not replace an actual glass eyepiece...

 

I feel that EAA is the textbook definition of giving up and surrendering to light pollution. If we all use these devices, supposedly LP doesn't matter anymore. This is exactly what the electric companies/crazy neighbors want!

 

And if you're viewing a fuzzy picture of a DSO on a screen, why not just cut out the scope and Google some Hubble pictures instead? Unlike EAA, that doesn't cost anything, and it's an identical experience!

 

We spend enough time in front of a screen viewing things that we are not directly witnessing (i.e. collecting photons from the actual event) - why should astronomy be that way too?

I understand what you're saying.  But...my orange zone skies have worsened into red zone skies over the past five years and I'm a long way away from a dark site.  So something like this would be a boon for my viewing.


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#27 George N

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 04:15 PM

Yes, it appears to be a standard telescope with an added CCD camera that stacks frames in real time resulting in a brighter and brighter more resolved image at the eyepiece.   ......

 

Wow!   ....just like what an SBIG ST-6 CCD could do in 1993 using SBIG's "track-n-accumulate".  :)


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#28 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 04:52 PM

understand what you're saying.  But...my orange zone skies have worsened into red zone skies over the past five years and I'm a long way away from a dark site.  So something like this would be a boon for my viewing.

 

 

Jon:

 

I suggest heading down to the Cloudy Nights EAA forum and see whats going on in the world of EAA..  There's some good stuff that works with your existing equipment...

 

Jon


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#29 Jon_Doh

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 04:34 PM

 

understand what you're saying.  But...my orange zone skies have worsened into red zone skies over the past five years and I'm a long way away from a dark site.  So something like this would be a boon for my viewing.

 

 

Jon:

 

I suggest heading down to the Cloudy Nights EAA forum and see whats going on in the world of EAA..  There's some good stuff that works with your existing equipment...

 

Jon

 

Thanks Jon.  I've never really looked much in that section, but will heed your advice and see what they're doing over there.



#30 ghostboo

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 05:24 PM

I've been wondering why this wasn't invented yet. Astronomy has come a long way in my lifetime. Now, we have computerized and self aligning mounts, a dedicated camera for revolutionizing polar alignment, and cameras so sensitive they can achieve the same effect as quadrupling the aperture of a scope. One day, EP's will have image enhancing technology built into them (my idea...you heard it here first).


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#31 cjdavis618

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 06:13 PM

I'm just waiting for the holographic OTA Projector...  :lol:


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#32 Feidb

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 03:26 PM

I did do the demo with the guys Friday evening, 6 January, and used my 16-inch for comparison. I'll give a more detailed report and my thoughts later when I have time. I'm at work now.


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#33 Feidb

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 08:29 PM

Well, I survived a night of sub-freezing out at Blue Diamond, a site southwest of Las Vegas with the Unistellar guys. It was an interesting night and a couple of LVAS members stopped by as well. Some of us call this particular location the "Blue Diamond" site because it's on the Blue Diamond Road, or the south road to Pahrump, as they say, "over the hump to Pahrump. As a matter of fact, just a few miles further up the road is the Mt. Potosi site where the Las Vegas Astronomical Society (LVAS) has our observatory.

 

The site isn't an ideal dark site, to say the least. It has a fairly dark view to the south and southwest, but to the east and northeast, you have the Las Vegas light dome. In fact, you can actually see the Strip, including the Luxor light! Yeah, that kind of place but it's a lot darker than anywhere in town. Also, that night, there were high thin cirrus clouds around so transparency was not going to be ideal, plus a quarter moon. To top it off, as you'll see, we had clouds moving in. In essence, this was perfect conditions to try out this enhanced EP.

 

Now a couple of caveats before we get going.

 

#1 This is something I'd never use personally because I'm a strict visual observer in that I prefer live photons, not Memorex. Also, if conditions are bad enough I need something like this, I'm just not going to observe.

 

#2 This device requires an automated telescope. Period. It will not work on a Dobsonian or any un-driven telescope. It's just not made for that. 

 

#3 This device has the potential to be a boon for those that can't get out to ideal skies and those looking to enhance their views even under ideal skies, if they choose.

 

Now, back to the story.

 

Laurent and company finally got their scope and eyepiece in but alas, part of it never made it. In fact, part of it was stolen, the part that allows communication with the outside world and also the labeling within the image, so while we could see the images, we could not see the labeling that showed up in the images on the web site. The scope operator, Arnaud Malvache was there first with the scope set up and he told me something about a police report because apparently, from what I gather, those pieces were part of the package and they were taken out of it when it went through customs. Oh well...

 

Arnaud and I had a great talk about the scope and the other guys joined us and we stayed pretty much in Orion or nearby. The views through the scope on M42/43 were actually comparable to my 16-inch.

 

Now, to repeat myself a bit, about sky conditions. The Blue Diamond site, which is the bicycle/hiking trail parking lot about five miles from the Potosi observatory on the Blue Diamond road isn't exactly a pristine location under the best of circumstances. In this case, a quarter moon or so was out. Plus the transparency was mush and clouds were starting to move in. However, we had a few holes. Does this sound like the "average" circumstances to which a lot of amateurs might take advantage of this technology? As you'll see in a moment, maybe so.

 

What I did notice about the EP was that the view was square, or actually rectangular and not round. Not a perfect rectangle either. That was the nature of the prototype, so I had no real issue with that. Another thing was that when he shifted to a different object, he had to put a cap on the end of the telescope tube to do a dark frame. Arnaud said the final version will do this automatically so people won't have to do that.

 

Now, the need for a drive was definitely there because it took a good minute at least to integrate. When he set it on the object, just like the Mallincam, you don't get an instant view. It takes time to develop, like film, at least in my view. However, once it does, the image clarifies. I will say though that I never did see any color. Maybe it was the particular unit or maybe it was the deplorable sky conditions.

 

At first, I had M42 at 102X in my scope but I wanted to try my new big honkin 30mm Explore Scientific 82 degree EP I got for Christmas. At 63X, that actually more matched the view they were getting in the smaller scope, so I kept that EP in there.

 

On brighter objects, the views pretty well matched.

 

While we were waiting for Laurent and the media to show up, Antonin Borot, the other part of the team (the one with glasses) showed up with a Spanish media guy and Antonin and I had a great chat. This was about the time the two LVAS guys left.

 

While Jerry was still there, I suggested a couple of other objects like the Horsehead. First we started with the flame, NGC-2024. Now, this was where the little scope really shined. As it turns out, it could not pull in the Horsehead. However, the flame, once the eyepiece integrated, showed up plain as day.

 

In my scope? With a UHC filter, it was so dim, I could just barely tell something was in the background but not enough to really call it an observation. Without a filter, it was completely invisible. This is a case where the image intensified eyepiece had a clear advantage over my scope.

 

Now, after we thoroughly explored that avenue, I asked him to try NGC-2022, a small planetary in the shoulders of Orion. It was very dim but still visible in my scope at 102X. Though he got the right area in the image intensified scope, no dice. The object was too small. It turns out, Arnaud told me that objects much smaller than the Ring Nebula are not cut for this device, especially in a smaller scope because the magnification is just too low. That's something I talked to them about Sunday in our final get-together critique. I said they need to do something about magnification. If that's wholly dependent on scope size, that would really limit the objects this device would work on. They talked about listing objects for different size scopes. I find that limiting, especially if one wants to pull in faint fuzzies like NGC galaxies, many of which would be too small to see.

 

For our final experiment before the rest arrived, we tried the Rosetta Nebula. Though the cluster appeared and the small scope showed a few more stars than mine did, neither of us saw even a hint of nebulosity.

 

So, back to the Orion Nebula.

 

For the media, when they finally showed up, his scope failed! The batteries died and he had a bad connection. Oh boy...

 

In the meantime, I showed them Orion and chatted with the Spaniards from Madrid. It seems we had something in common since I lived there for 10 years.

 

Things got a bit tense for the team because clouds moved in and completely obscured Orion, but finally, just in the nick of time, batteries changed, connection fixed, Arnaud ran through the whole setup again, got everything tweaked and the clouds moved over just enough to do the demo. The reporters got to see the Orion Nebula through both scopes then we went to the Flame Nebula and they saw it fine in the little scope and absolutely nothing in mine.

 

Whew!

 

That was pretty much it. We were all popsicles by then and packed up. My Gatorade I'd been nursing was almost frozen. I never did finish it.

 

I took three photos but have never been successful attaching images here at Cloudy Nights without sending them to the moderator. So, I'll say you're not missing much! They're not the greatest since I took them in the dark and couldn't see what I was shooting.

 

So, that's it for now.


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#34 ghostboo

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 10:03 PM

Feidb, thanks for the comparison and info. That was very interesting. Was image quality nice like in a good EP or did it look blotchy and "fake" like it does with some EAA cameras?


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#35 Feidb

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 10:14 PM

No, the image was actually quite nice, especially given the magnification. I saw no pixilation at all. When we looked at NGC-2022, or rather for it, to be more specific, I never found it but I found a lot of "round" stars and none that were square, even the pinpointed ones. As for the Trapezium in M42, it was very tiny and almost a blur at that magnification, but you could just tell four dots. The resolution at that size of an image was basically telescope quality. Now, if it had been blown up on a 19-inch monitor like a Mallincam, well...I couldn't speak for that!

\


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#36 Jon_Doh

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 09:19 AM

Thanks for the detailed report Feidb.  You are a  true pioneer!


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#37 FAREHAM_MAN

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 12:02 PM

Would there ever be problems of dewing up or have they got that covered?

Is it a GOTO Control unit.

do know whether there will be a Wireless download of the image. That would be brilliant. Just think of stacking several images from that little beast?

it could lead to finding a few asteroids hopefully.


Edited by FAREHAM_MAN, 26 July 2017 - 12:04 PM.


#38 Feidb

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 04:14 PM

Would there ever be problems of dewing up or have they got that covered?

Is it a GOTO Control unit.

do know whether there will be a Wireless download of the image. That would be brilliant. Just think of stacking several images from that little beast?

it could lead to finding a few asteroids hopefully.

Can't answer those questions based on the demo I was part of. The EP was rigged to a standard but tiny scope that night. The actual scope it's supposed to be coupled with wasn't present (it's rather tiny also, 4 1/4-inch, same as the demo model), the full boat, so to speak. It was just the eyepiece. I have no idea what model this or model that the scope was, maybe a Celestron something or tuther. It was just so they could demo the EP rig. However, there were pieces also missing that got lost in the shipment from France. So, some of the demo wasn't complete. It was enough to show that it worked, at least the EP part. Now, the whole package, which is now up on their web site, looks intriguing. Well, intriguing for those that may be inclined to use such a thing. I'll still stick with my 16-inch Dob, but it still looks like something that may have a future for others. I'm watching to see how it develops.



#39 caballerodiez91

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 08:48 AM

Well, I survived a night of sub-freezing out at Blue Diamond, a site southwest of Las Vegas with the Unistellar guys. It was an interesting night and a couple of LVAS members stopped by as well. Some of us call this particular location the "Blue Diamond" site because it's on the Blue Diamond Road, or the south road to Pahrump, as they say, "over the hump to Pahrump. As a matter of fact, just a few miles further up the road is the Mt. Potosi site where the Las Vegas Astronomical Society (LVAS) has our observatory.

 

The site isn't an ideal dark site, to say the least. It has a fairly dark view to the south and southwest, but to the east and northeast, you have the Las Vegas light dome. In fact, you can actually see the Strip, including the Luxor light! Yeah, that kind of place but it's a lot darker than anywhere in town. Also, that night, there were high thin cirrus clouds around so transparency was not going to be ideal, plus a quarter moon. To top it off, as you'll see, we had clouds moving in. In essence, this was perfect conditions to try out this enhanced EP.

 

Now a couple of caveats before we get going.

 

#1 This is something I'd never use personally because I'm a strict visual observer in that I prefer live photons, not Memorex. Also, if conditions are bad enough I need something like this, I'm just not going to observe.

 

#2 This device requires an automated telescope. Period. It will not work on a Dobsonian or any un-driven telescope. It's just not made for that. 

 

#3 This device has the potential to be a boon for those that can't get out to ideal skies and those looking to enhance their views even under ideal skies, if they choose.

 

Now, back to the story.

 

Laurent and company finally got their scope and eyepiece in but alas, part of it never made it. In fact, part of it was stolen, the part that allows communication with the outside world and also the labeling within the image, so while we could see the images, we could not see the labeling that showed up in the images on the web site. The scope operator, Arnaud Malvache was there first with the scope set up and he told me something about a police report because apparently, from what I gather, those pieces were part of the package and they were taken out of it when it went through customs. Oh well...

 

Arnaud and I had a great talk about the scope and the other guys joined us and we stayed pretty much in Orion or nearby. The views through the scope on M42/43 were actually comparable to my 16-inch.

 

Now, to repeat myself a bit, about sky conditions. The Blue Diamond site, which is the bicycle/hiking trail parking lot about five miles from the Potosi observatory on the Blue Diamond road isn't exactly a pristine location under the best of circumstances. In this case, a quarter moon or so was out. Plus the transparency was mush and clouds were starting to move in. However, we had a few holes. Does this sound like the "average" circumstances to which a lot of amateurs might take advantage of this technology? As you'll see in a moment, maybe so.

 

What I did notice about the EP was that the view was square, or actually rectangular and not round. Not a perfect rectangle either. That was the nature of the prototype, so I had no real issue with that. Another thing was that when he shifted to a different object, he had to put a cap on the end of the telescope tube to do a dark frame. Arnaud said the final version will do this automatically so people won't have to do that.

 

Now, the need for a drive was definitely there because it took a good minute at least to integrate. When he set it on the object, just like the Mallincam, you don't get an instant view. It takes time to develop, like film, at least in my view. However, once it does, the image clarifies. I will say though that I never did see any color. Maybe it was the particular unit or maybe it was the deplorable sky conditions.

 

At first, I had M42 at 102X in my scope but I wanted to try my new big honkin 30mm Explore Scientific 82 degree EP I got for Christmas. At 63X, that actually more matched the view they were getting in the smaller scope, so I kept that EP in there.

 

On brighter objects, the views pretty well matched.

 

While we were waiting for Laurent and the media to show up, Antonin Borot, the other part of the team (the one with glasses) showed up with a Spanish media guy and Antonin and I had a great chat. This was about the time the two LVAS guys left.

 

While Jerry was still there, I suggested a couple of other objects like the Horsehead. First we started with the flame, NGC-2024. Now, this was where the little scope really shined. As it turns out, it could not pull in the Horsehead. However, the flame, once the eyepiece integrated, showed up plain as day.

 

In my scope? With a UHC filter, it was so dim, I could just barely tell something was in the background but not enough to really call it an observation. Without a filter, it was completely invisible. This is a case where the image intensified eyepiece had a clear advantage over my scope.

 

Now, after we thoroughly explored that avenue, I asked him to try NGC-2022, a small planetary in the shoulders of Orion. It was very dim but still visible in my scope at 102X. Though he got the right area in the image intensified scope, no dice. The object was too small. It turns out, Arnaud told me that objects much smaller than the Ring Nebula are not cut for this device, especially in a smaller scope because the magnification is just too low. That's something I talked to them about Sunday in our final get-together critique. I said they need to do something about magnification. If that's wholly dependent on scope size, that would really limit the objects this device would work on. They talked about listing objects for different size scopes. I find that limiting, especially if one wants to pull in faint fuzzies like NGC galaxies, many of which would be too small to see.

 

For our final experiment before the rest arrived, we tried the Rosetta Nebula. Though the cluster appeared and the small scope showed a few more stars than mine did, neither of us saw even a hint of nebulosity.

 

So, back to the Orion Nebula.

 

For the media, when they finally showed up, his scope failed! The batteries died and he had a bad connection. Oh boy...

 

In the meantime, I showed them Orion and chatted with the Spaniards from Madrid. It seems we had something in common since I lived there for 10 years.

 

Things got a bit tense for the team because clouds moved in and completely obscured Orion, but finally, just in the nick of time, batteries changed, connection fixed, Arnaud ran through the whole setup again, got everything tweaked and the clouds moved over just enough to do the demo. The reporters got to see the Orion Nebula through both scopes then we went to the Flame Nebula and they saw it fine in the little scope and absolutely nothing in mine.

 

Whew!

 

That was pretty much it. We were all popsicles by then and packed up. My Gatorade I'd been nursing was almost frozen. I never did finish it.

 

I took three photos but have never been successful attaching images here at Cloudy Nights without sending them to the moderator. So, I'll say you're not missing much! They're not the greatest since I took them in the dark and couldn't see what I was shooting.

 

So, that's it for now.

Very interesting post.

I still have a doubt.. I read you weren't able to see colors.. what does it need to happen to see colors? a darker sky? I guess a bigger aperture, but I was thinking in buying the normal evscope, the one that costs less than 1,000 euros.

It's a shame it's not possible to see planetary nebula smaller than the ring nebula. I found a list with the biggest planetary nebulae: http://www.skyandtel...netary-nebulae/

I hope evscope show them well.


Edited by caballerodiez91, 16 August 2017 - 08:48 AM.


#40 saguaro

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 09:44 AM

Anyone in Las Vegas planning to attend one of these CES events?

https://unistellarop...izen-astronomy/



#41 REC

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 03:16 PM

Anyone in Las Vegas planning to attend one of these CES events?

https://unistellarop...izen-astronomy/

Sounds interesting to see.



#42 aorion314

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 01:36 AM

aorion314 here, item1 it is a press release, sadly lacking in science based data, the photos shown may well be photoshoped  and no info about the telescope used and under what conditions, just plain and simply looks to good, but the times and technology are a changing, let us be optimistic and how come no other telescope firms are producing prototypes or rumors thereof, respectfully submitted.



#43 bvillebob

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 02:10 PM

So what ever happened to the last several "miracle scopes" that were supposed to do the same thing and were all hyped last year.  Forgotten already?



#44 sg6

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 05:11 AM

The eVscope and Unistellar have been "producing" this scope for a couple of years now, and so far nothing appears to have come of it. It is Dec 2019 before any appear, and then $2,000.

 

Reads as a 114mm mirror and f/4, that reads as trouble as it is too fast or it is spherical there are a couple of 114 sphericals out there, and if spherical at that speed whatever image is formed on the 224 sensor has to be questionable.

 

If Meade brought out their LS 6 with a suitable EAA chip/setup then that appears to match the eVscope. So Unistellar are not exactly breaking new ground. All the talk is sort of standard marketting talk, as the scope is not up and apparently running the images would appear to be sourced from elsewhere.

 

Progress seems slow for what the product is. I suppose the problem they face is as said a Meade LS6+imaging chip is much the same and a Celestron 6SE with integrated GPS, Starsense and an imaging chip and almost immediatly there are 2 big competitors in the market.



#45 csa/montana

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 09:50 AM

This is an old thread, resurrected; so will be moved to Equipment for better fit of topic.




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