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Collimating your Collimator (believe it or not)

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#1 smolony

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 03:07 PM

Who would have thought that you have to collimate your stupid laser collimator? Well I found out the hard way when I got the new Orion Laser Collimator and used it on 3 scopes only to find out that they were whacked when I got out the other night.

 

So I found this guy on YouTube and he showed me this and it worked. I figured I would shoot some pictures and pass it on.

Here is how to do it.

 

Parts

 

(4) half inch PVC T's
(2) half inch PVC Elbow's
(1) half inch pipe cut to about 8 inches long

 

Cut the pipe in 1 inch pieces to use to connect the T's and elbows together

 

Create the rack as seen in picture 1

 

Use some kneaded eraser (found in art section at drug store) and stick the rack to something smooth so it does not move. Picture 2

 

Put a white piece of paper on the wall about 6 to 8 feet away from rack and draw a black dot on it. Picture 3

 

Lay the laser collimator on the rack and turn it on and line it up on the black dot on the paper. Picture 4

 

Now spin the collimator and watch the red dot. If it is collimated the laser will remain on the black dot. If it is not then it will go in a circle around the dot. The size of the circle is determined by how far out of collimation it is.

 

Now find the adjustment screws on the collimator. Picture 5

 

Use an allen wrench and slowly adjust the three screws 1 at a time on the collimator and remember a little goes a long way here.

 

After making and adjustment place it back on the rack like in Picture 4 and keep testing it on the rack until the laser stays in the black dot

Once it does not leave the dot your done. It collimated.

 

1 Collimating Frame.jpg

 

2 Fasten Collimating Rack.jpg

 

3 Collimating Paper Target.jpg

 

4 Target Laser.jpg

 

5 Adjusting Allen Wrench Screws.jpg


Edited by smolony, 07 January 2017 - 03:08 PM.

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#2 CHASLX200

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 03:29 PM

You can spin it in the focuser and see if its off.



#3 precaud

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 03:31 PM

That's a very complex solution to a simple problem. This works just fine.

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#4 nevy

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 04:19 PM

Who would have thought that you have to collimate your stupid laser collimator? Well I found out the hard way when I got the new Orion Laser Collimator and used it on 3 scopes only to find out that they were whacked when I got out the other night.

 

So I found this guy on YouTube and he showed me this and it worked. I figured I would shoot some pictures and pass it on.

Here is how to do it.

 

Parts

 

(4) half inch PVC T's
(2) half inch PVC Elbow's
(1) half inch pipe cut to about 8 inches long

 

Cut the pipe in 1 inch pieces to use to connect the T's and elbows together

 

Create the rack as seen in picture 1

 

Use some kneaded eraser (found in art section at drug store) and stick the rack to something smooth so it does not move. Picture 2

 

Put a white piece of paper on the wall about 6 to 8 feet away from rack and draw a black dot on it. Picture 3

 

Lay the laser collimator on the rack and turn it on and line it up on the black dot on the paper. Picture 4

 

Now spin the collimator and watch the red dot. If it is collimated the laser will remain on the black dot. If it is not then it will go in a circle around the dot. The size of the circle is determined by how far out of collimation it is.

 

Now find the adjustment screws on the collimator. Picture 5

 

Use an allen wrench and slowly adjust the three screws 1 at a time on the collimator and remember a little goes a long way here.

 

After making and adjustment place it back on the rack like in Picture 4 and keep testing it on the rack until the laser stays in the black dot

Once it does not leave the dot your done. It collimated.

 

attachicon.gif1 Collimating Frame.jpg

 

attachicon.gif2 Fasten Collimating Rack.jpg

 

attachicon.gif3 Collimating Paper Target.jpg

 

attachicon.gif4 Target Laser.jpg

 

attachicon.gif5 Adjusting Allen Wrench Screws.jpg

I wouldn't listen to much to that gay on YouTube if it's the one I'm thinking it is, he doesn't fully understand how laser collimation work , he keeps saying lasers lie. 

Hes right about the cheapie lasers  allways need collimating though. 

 


Edited by nevy, 07 January 2017 - 04:21 PM.


#5 havasman

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 04:25 PM

Even collimated you still have the elongated bar the Orion laser presents instead of the small dot you get with a Glatter. One might be able to rig a proper orifice to control spot size but the Glatter (and possibly the Farpoint) comes with one in place.


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#6 nevy

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 04:41 PM

That's a very complex solution to a simple problem. This works just fine.

Also you can use a scrap piece of wood with four nails ,make 2 sets of nails a few inches apart in an X shape. 


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#7 smolony

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 04:46 PM

Ok all good

 

It was just a thought

 

worked for me


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#8 aeajr

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 07:00 PM

I just got the Orion Collimator.  Have not checked it yet.



#9 Antares89

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 08:12 PM

Not trying to hijack the thread but I wasn't sure if this warranted it's own thread or not. I accidentally knocked my laser collimator off a dresser the other day and sure enough, it's not collimated anymore. It is a Zhumell collimator that came free with my Zhumell Z10 Dobsonian. It was collimated when I first got it - I verified this by rotating it while it was in the focuser. My question is, how do I adjust the collimation of the laser collimator itself? I've adjusted the 3 adjustment screws towards the back every way I can think of and it doesn't seem to be changing anything. Anyone got any ideas? Any tricks for knowing which combinations of the 3 screws I should tighten and loosen?



#10 Antares89

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 09:29 PM

Figured it out. There is a brass ferrule inside the collimator that the adjustment screws screw down on and compress. One 'side' of the ferrule was slightly crushed and the ferrule was no longer round. I pinched the ferrule with some pliers and got most of the roundness back and the adjustment screws worked after that.


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#11 airbleeder

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 10:07 PM

   I successfully collimated my Orion laser but finally decided to buy a Glatter. I am glad I did. The difference was like a dash and a dot. 


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#12 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 09:38 PM

Ok all good

 

It was just a thought

 

worked for me

 

:waytogo:

 

One thing to consider when collimating a laser is that the front section and the rear section may not be concentric, they are probably not machined in the same operation.  Ideally, the laser would be collimated referenced to the front section that fits in the focuser to avoid this potential issue.  

 

I wouldn't listen to much to that guy on YouTube if it's the one I'm thinking it is, he doesn't fully understand how laser collimation work , he keeps saying lasers lie.
Hes right about the cheapie lasers  allways need collimating though.

 

 

Do you have a link to the video.  Laser are reliable for setting the tilt of the secondary.. Unreliable for adjusting the tilt of the primary even with the most precisely made collimators.  That's why Nils Olof Carlin devised the Barlowed Laser Technique and why Howie Glatter designed the self-Barlow, the Blug and the Tublug to make Barlowed Laser Collimation easier.. 

 

Jon

 

Jon


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#13 SteveG

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 02:32 PM

 

Ok all good

 

It was just a thought

 

worked for me

 

:waytogo:

 

One thing to consider when collimating a laser is that the front section and the rear section may not be concentric, they are probably not machined in the same operation.  Ideally, the laser would be collimated referenced to the front section that fits in the focuser to avoid this potential issue.  

 

I wouldn't listen to much to that guy on YouTube if it's the one I'm thinking it is, he doesn't fully understand how laser collimation work , he keeps saying lasers lie.
Hes right about the cheapie lasers  allways need collimating though.

 

 

Do you have a link to the video.  Laser are reliable for setting the tilt of the secondary.. Unreliable for adjusting the tilt of the primary even with the most precisely made collimators.  That's why Nils Olof Carlin devised the Barlowed Laser Technique and why Howie Glatter designed the self-Barlow, the Blug and the Tublug to make Barlowed Laser Collimation easier.. 

 

Jon

 

Jon

 

I would add that if you do have a cheap laser that is collimated itself, you can just purchase the Blug or Tublug from Glatter. It will still work with your cheap laser.




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