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Top things to obeserve in the sky

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#26 Starman1

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 10:27 AM

I never had any luck finding M1.  Geez, what kind of astronomer am I, if I can't even find the 1st Messier object!  M57 the Ring was much easier to find.  M76 the Little Dumbbell is near Perseus.  Found it by accident one night star hopping from Cassiopeia to Andromeda.  M76 wasn't very impressive in my small scope, but it was still pretty cool to find it.

It's right near a bright star, Zeta Tauri (aka 123 Tauri).



#27 csrlice12

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 11:34 AM

Get a solar filter and look at sunspots, and on the one night a month the sky is clear, the full moon will be available.  When its up (Summer/Fall) M8 is a sight not to be missed,  the Swan might still be visable.  At low power and a UHC or OIII filter, the Veil pops out and has two sides and probably won't fully fit in your fov unless you have a richest field scope.  There's also the Andromeda Galaxy....a jaw dropping low power treat.



#28 Asiris

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 11:52 AM

Looking at the sun through a solar filter, I imagine, must be amazing, I can't wait to see the solar eclipse on Aug 21st. I really want to find all the Messier objects but I have to wait for the weather to clear up, would love to see the Andromeda galaxy.


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#29 dhawn

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 05:43 PM

 

I've never heard of NGC457 being referred to as "the Dragonfly Cluster" before.  I'd heard "Owl Cluster", "Kachina Doll Cluster" and "E.T.Cluster" 

I wonder where that name came from.  I've seen that cluster for well over 50 years now and never heard the name before, even at star parties.

 

Ditto with M34's being called the "Spiral Cluster".

Can you recall where you first heard those names?

 

NGC457 - "Dragonfly Cluster" and M34 - "Spiral Cluster" are both labeled that way in Stellarium, which seems to be rather popular.



#30 My 2 Stars

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 09:07 PM

I apologize if this has already been mentioned, but there are many lists that show what objects are best during a certain season.



#31 Starman1

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 09:09 PM

And for the rank beginner: http://skymaps.com



#32 Asiris

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 09:12 PM

Thanks, I'll check that out!


Edited by Asiris, 24 January 2017 - 09:12 PM.


#33 Kid_A

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 12:24 AM

 

 

I've never heard of NGC457 being referred to as "the Dragonfly Cluster" before.  I'd heard "Owl Cluster", "Kachina Doll Cluster" and "E.T.Cluster" 

I wonder where that name came from.  I've seen that cluster for well over 50 years now and never heard the name before, even at star parties.

 

Ditto with M34's being called the "Spiral Cluster".

Can you recall where you first heard those names?

 

NGC457 - "Dragonfly Cluster" and M34 - "Spiral Cluster" are both labeled that way in Stellarium, which seems to be rather popular.

 

Yup, Stellarium is the culprit, and also a list I got of 100 best objects for binoculars and small telescopes that uses the same names- PDF warning: http://carolrpt.com/...ev9complete.pdf

NGC 457 has more names than any cluster I know. 



#34 Asiris

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 11:07 AM

I'm really thankful for all the options for me to check out, I actually was able to see the Crab nebula (M1) last night and it was awesome, or as awesome as a brown smudge can be, which in this case is a lot.


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#35 dhawn

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 02:37 PM

I think the Crab Nebula is probably one of the "threshold" objects in the sky.  Many people will look at smudges like the Crab and think "so what?" If that faint smudge is awesome to you, then you're probably in for a long and fulfilling hobby.  :)

 

I was also looking at it last night and also thought it was awesome! 



#36 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 02:59 PM

 

 

 

I've never heard of NGC457 being referred to as "the Dragonfly Cluster" before.  I'd heard "Owl Cluster", "Kachina Doll Cluster" and "E.T.Cluster" 

I wonder where that name came from.  I've seen that cluster for well over 50 years now and never heard the name before, even at star parties.

 

Ditto with M34's being called the "Spiral Cluster".

Can you recall where you first heard those names?

 

NGC457 - "Dragonfly Cluster" and M34 - "Spiral Cluster" are both labeled that way in Stellarium, which seems to be rather popular.

 

Yup, Stellarium is the culprit, and also a list I got of 100 best objects for binoculars and small telescopes that uses the same names- PDF warning: http://carolrpt.com/...ev9complete.pdf

NGC 457 has more names than any cluster I know. 

 

See the thread at http://www.cloudynig...s/?hl= ngc 457

 

Dave Mitsky



#37 Asiris

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 04:42 PM

Yeah, I'm very interested in nebulae, I think they always look pretty, even without color. Tonight I hope to see the Orion nebula, the crab nebula, and maybe a few others as well.



#38 KOstar

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 05:15 PM

Google the "Ultimate Messier Object Log".  Seems like it was compiled as giveware by a fellow by the name of David Green.  It comes as a pdf file.  Includes pictures, coordinates, log sheets you can print out and a seasonal list of the objects as well. 

 

If you can't find it, PM me with your email and I will send it to you.

 

Keith



#39 Asiris

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 05:19 PM

Thanks I'll look for it!


Edited by Asiris, 27 January 2017 - 05:19 PM.


#40 chrysalis

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 09:56 AM

At this time of year, the following planets, binary/multiple stars, carbon stars, and deep-sky objects that you have not yet seen are reasonable targets (some of them early in the night, some much later): Uranus, Neptune, Almach, Beta Monocerotis, Castor, h3945, Sigma Orionis, Struve 761, R Leporis, W Orionis, M1, M15, M31, M32, M33, M34, M35, M36, M37, M38, M39, M41, M44, M46, M47, M48, M50, M67, M76, M78, M79, M81, M82, M93, M103, M110, NGC 457, NGC 752, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 2158, NGC 2169, NGC 2244, NGC 2264, NGC 2360, NGC 2362, NGC 2301, NGC 2392, NGC 3242, and NGC 7789.  Some of these will be easier than others, both to locate and to detect.
 
Here are a number of resources regarding observing deep-sky objects, binary/multiple stars, and carbon stars.  Some of them will be tough targets for small apertures or from light-polluted locales.
 
http://messier.seds.org/indexes.html (the Messier Catalog)
 
http://messier.seds....r/sac110bn.html (the SAC's best objects in the NGC list)
 
http://messier.seds....r/rasc-ngc.html (the RASC's finest NGC objects list)
 
http://www.tyler.net...pot/saa100.html (the sci.astro.amateur 100)
 
http://www.taas.org/...00/taas200.html (the TAAS 200)
 
https://www.astrolea...00/h400lstn.pdf (the Astronomical League's Herschel 400)
 
http://www.stpeteast...ces/thelist.pdf (Vic Menard's list of 400 objects)
 
http://www.cloudynig...-best-dso-list/ (Don Pensack's Best 500 Deep Sky Objects list)
 
http://www.raycash.org/dm600.htm (the Orion Deep Map 600)
 
http://www.clarkvisi...appendix-e.html (Roger Clark's catalog of 611 deep-sky objects)
 
http://messier.seds....lar/BElistA.txt (the Boyd Edwards list of 884 objects)
 
http://messier.seds....milar/m1000.txt (the Magnificent 1000 by Tom Hoffelder)
 
http://www.1000plus.com/2000plus/ (the Tomm Lorenzin 2000+)
 
http://www.astroleag...r/dblstar2.html (binary stars)
 
http://www.skyandtel...h/double-stars/ (binary stars)
 
https://www.astrolea...bonStarLog3.pdf (carbon stars)
 
http://www.eaglecree...eco/carbon.html (carbon stars)
 
http://www.astrosurf...iar2/carbon.htm (carbon stars)
 
http://www.1000plus.com/redstars.htm (carbon stars)
 
http://www.nckas.org/carbonstars/ (carbon stars)
 
The following are the monthly top ten DSO lists from my Celestial Calendar:
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for January: M1, M36, M37, M38, M42, M43, M78, M79, NGC 1501, NGC 2024
 
The objects listed above are located between 4:00 and 6:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for February: M35, M41, M46, M47, M50, M93, NGC 2261, NGC 2362, NGC 2392, NGC 2403
 
The objects listed above are located between 6:00 and 8:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for March: M44, M48, M67, M81, M82, NGC 2654, NGC 2683, NGC 2835, NGC 2841, NGC 2903
 
The objects listed above are located between 8:00 and 10:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for April: M65, M66, M95, M96, M97, M105, M108, NGC 3115, NGC 3242, NGC 3628
 
The objects listed above are located between 10:00 and 12:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for May: M3, M51, M63, M64, M83, M87, M104, M106, NGC 4449, NGC 4565
 
The objects listed above are located between 12:00 and 14:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for June: M5, M101, M102, NGC 5566, NGC 5585, NGC 5689, NGC 5746, NGC 5813, NGC 5838, NGC 5907
 
The objects listed above are located between 14:00 and 16:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for July: M4, M6, M7, M10, M12, M13, M92, NGC 6210, NGC 6231, NGC 6543
 
The objects listed above are located between 16:00 and 18:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for August: M8, M11, M16, M17, M20, M22, M24, M27, M55, M57
 
The objects listed above are located between 18:00 and 20:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for September: IC 1396, M2, M15, M30, NGC 6888, NGC 6946, NGC 6960, NGC 6992, NGC 7000, NGC 7009
 
The objects listed above are located between 20:00 and 22:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for October: K12, M52, NGC 7209, NGC 7293, NGC 7331, NGC 7332, NGC 7339, NGC 7640, NGC 7662, NGC 7789
 
The objects listed above are located between 22:00 and 24:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for November: M31, M32, M33, M76, M103, M110, NGC 40, NGC 253, NGC 457, NGC 752
 
The objects listed above are located between 0:00 and 2:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Top ten deep-sky objects for December: M34, M45, M77, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 891, NGC 1023, NGC 1232, NGC 1332, NGC 1360
 
The objects listed above are located between 2:00 and 4:00 hours of right ascension.
 
Dave Mitsky


Wow Dave, excellent!!!

#41 chrysalis

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 10:03 AM

Attached File  Amalia's 200 v15.xls   42.5KB   8 downloads

Attached File  Best 500 Deep Sky Objects.xlsx   239.54KB   7 downloads

Attached File  DSO List Vic Menard.pdf   38KB   8 downloads

Attached File  Objects Beyond Messier - Next100.xls   50.5KB   9 downloads

Attached File  RASC Best DSOs.doc   59KB   6 downloads

#42 chrysalis

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 10:04 AM

http://www.cloudynig...ublesmultiples/

#43 Keith Rivich

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 10:24 AM

 

I never had any luck finding M1.  Geez, what kind of astronomer am I, if I can't even find the 1st Messier object!  M57 the Ring was much easier to find.  M76 the Little Dumbbell is near Perseus.  Found it by accident one night star hopping from Cassiopeia to Andromeda.  M76 wasn't very impressive in my small scope, but it was still pretty cool to find it.

It's right near a bright star, Zeta Tauri (aka 123 Tauri).

 

 

And its bigger and fainter then you think it is. In my 18" under not-so-dark skies I have been known to pass it by several times before finally catching it. Its quite easy under dark skies.



#44 Asiris

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 10:15 PM

At this time of year, the following planets, binary/multiple stars, carbon stars, and deep-sky objects that you have not yet seen are reasonable targets (some of them early in the night, some much later): Uranus, Neptune, Almach, Beta Monocerotis, Castor, h3945, Sigma Orionis, Struve 761, R Leporis, W Orionis, M1, M15, M31, M32, M33, M34, M35, M36, M37, M38, M39, M41, M44, M46, M47, M48, M50, M67, M76, M78, M79, M81, M82, M93, M103, M110, NGC 457, NGC 752, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 2158, NGC 2169, NGC 2244, NGC 2264, NGC 2360, NGC 2362, NGC 2301, NGC 2392, NGC 3242, and NGC 7789.  Some of these will be easier than others, both to locate and to detect.

 

Here are a number of resources regarding observing deep-sky objects, binary/multiple stars, and carbon stars.  Some of them will be tough targets for small apertures or from light-polluted locales.

 

http://messier.seds.org/indexes.html (the Messier Catalog)

 

http://messier.seds....r/sac110bn.html (the SAC's best objects in the NGC list)

 

http://messier.seds....r/rasc-ngc.html (the RASC's finest NGC objects list)

 

http://www.tyler.net...pot/saa100.html (the sci.astro.amateur 100)

 

http://www.taas.org/...00/taas200.html (the TAAS 200)

 

https://www.astrolea...00/h400lstn.pdf (the Astronomical League's Herschel 400)

 

http://www.stpeteast...ces/thelist.pdf (Vic Menard's list of 400 objects)

 

http://www.cloudynig...-best-dso-list/ (Don Pensack's Best 500 Deep Sky Objects list)

 

http://www.raycash.org/dm600.htm (the Orion Deep Map 600)

 

http://www.clarkvisi...appendix-e.html (Roger Clark's catalog of 611 deep-sky objects)

 

http://messier.seds....lar/BElistA.txt (the Boyd Edwards list of 884 objects)

 

http://messier.seds....milar/m1000.txt (the Magnificent 1000 by Tom Hoffelder)

 

http://www.1000plus.com/2000plus/ (the Tomm Lorenzin 2000+)

 

http://www.astroleag...r/dblstar2.html (binary stars)

 

http://www.skyandtel...h/double-stars/ (binary stars)

 

https://www.astrolea...bonStarLog3.pdf (carbon stars)

 

http://www.eaglecree...eco/carbon.html (carbon stars)

 

http://www.astrosurf...iar2/carbon.htm (carbon stars)

 

http://www.1000plus.com/redstars.htm (carbon stars)

 

http://www.nckas.org/carbonstars/ (carbon stars)

 

The following are the monthly top ten DSO lists from my Celestial Calendar:

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for January: M1, M36, M37, M38, M42, M43, M78, M79, NGC 1501, NGC 2024

 

The objects listed above are located between 4:00 and 6:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for February: M35, M41, M46, M47, M50, M93, NGC 2261, NGC 2362, NGC 2392, NGC 2403

 

The objects listed above are located between 6:00 and 8:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for March: M44, M48, M67, M81, M82, NGC 2654, NGC 2683, NGC 2835, NGC 2841, NGC 2903

 

The objects listed above are located between 8:00 and 10:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for April: M65, M66, M95, M96, M97, M105, M108, NGC 3115, NGC 3242, NGC 3628

 

The objects listed above are located between 10:00 and 12:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for May: M3, M51, M63, M64, M83, M87, M104, M106, NGC 4449, NGC 4565

 

The objects listed above are located between 12:00 and 14:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for June: M5, M101, M102, NGC 5566, NGC 5585, NGC 5689, NGC 5746, NGC 5813, NGC 5838, NGC 5907

 

The objects listed above are located between 14:00 and 16:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for July: M4, M6, M7, M10, M12, M13, M92, NGC 6210, NGC 6231, NGC 6543

 

The objects listed above are located between 16:00 and 18:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for August: M8, M11, M16, M17, M20, M22, M24, M27, M55, M57

 

The objects listed above are located between 18:00 and 20:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for September: IC 1396, M2, M15, M30, NGC 6888, NGC 6946, NGC 6960, NGC 6992, NGC 7000, NGC 7009

 

The objects listed above are located between 20:00 and 22:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for October: K12, M52, NGC 7209, NGC 7293, NGC 7331, NGC 7332, NGC 7339, NGC 7640, NGC 7662, NGC 7789

 

The objects listed above are located between 22:00 and 24:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for November: M31, M32, M33, M76, M103, M110, NGC 40, NGC 253, NGC 457, NGC 752

 

The objects listed above are located between 0:00 and 2:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Top ten deep-sky objects for December: M34, M45, M77, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 891, NGC 1023, NGC 1232, NGC 1332, NGC 1360

 

The objects listed above are located between 2:00 and 4:00 hours of right ascension.

 

Dave Mitsky

That's a lot of stuff to look for but thanks!



#45 ensign

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 12:42 PM

I apologize if this has already been mentioned, but Sue French's book:

 

https://www.amazon.c...ords=Sue French

 

has a great number of objects organized by month.  I highly recommend it.



#46 Asiris

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 11:54 AM

Thanks, I'll check it out!




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