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Open Cluster NGC 1857 in Auriga

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#1 stevecoe

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 03:09 PM

Howdy all;

 

Here is a set of observations and a drawing of this cluster that is overhead now.  It does seem to get better with more aperture.

 

NGC 1857 TV 102 Antennas site  Seeing and Transparency=6/10, a mediocre night  14mm eyepiece faint, pretty small, not rich and somewhat compressed cluster that is poorly detached.  I can see 7 stars and a fuzzy background with direct vision and averted vision adds about 10 more stars and makes the cluster a little more prominent.  It is still not much in the 4 inch refractor.

 

NGC 1857 6" f/8 refractor Antennas S=6, T=8 14mm pretty bright, pretty large, pretty rich, pretty compressed, 29 stars counted of magnitude 7 and then 9 and fainter.  The central star is yellow, nice cluster.

 

NGC 1857 Nexstar 11 Messier Marathon S=7 T=5 125X pretty bright, pretty large, 25 stars mags 8, 10 and fainter.  Pretty well detached.  There is a nice curved chain of stars with a pretty bright orange star in the center.

 

NGC 1857 13" f/5.6 Newtonian  Sentinel site S=6, T=8 Bright and Rich.  Very nice at 165X, an 8th mag yellow star with several nice star chains radiating out from it.  45 members counted in about 12 minutes of cluster size.

 

NGC 1857 13" f/5.6 Granite Wash Mt. S=7 T=8 100X--easily seen as cluster.  150X--pretty bright, pretty large, pretty rich, somewhat compressed, 38 stars counted, including an 8th magnitude yellow star near center of cluster.  There are many faint members that are easier at high power, including several beautiful chains of stars.

 

Have fun;

Steve Coe

 

The drawing was made with the 13" scope at 165X:

 

AUR_NGC 1857_13in_165X.jpg



#2 dhawn

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 12:35 PM

I've been working through the open clusters in Auriga lately.  Nice sketch.



#3 chrysalis

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 10:26 AM

Lovely sketch.

I've been slowly compiling a list of OCs withg bright central star that includes NGC1857:

http://www.cloudynig...62#entry7601051

#4 stevecoe

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 07:05 PM

Chrysalis, et al;

 

Thank you for the kind words.  I have also seem many open clusters that include bright stars.  As the material that forms the cluster starts to shrink down and form stars, the middle must be the most dense and so form a brighter star within the cluster.

 

Enjoy;

Steve Coe



#5 Organic Astrochemist

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 01:28 AM

Great cluster. Thanks Steve.

For me, with only an 8" scope, the trick was to use more magnification. Luckily, the cluster is only about 10 arcminutes wide, so I could still see the whole thing. At 300X, I could see most of the stars in your sketch. Based on this map I could see easily down to mag 13. Fainter stars kept winking in and out. That happens to be a view that I really like -- it tickles my eye and brain. It was a little harder to see the structure of those chains, but I could work my way down one star at a time and build up a picture of the whole cluster.

Physcially, I don't think the K-type star is part of the cluster. Personally, I think it would be easier to see fainter cluster members if it wasn't there, but the contrast is interesting.



#6 azure1961p

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 09:23 AM

Nice work Steve,

 

 

The comparative accounts really make it happen.

 

Pete



#7 Sarkikos

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 10:25 AM

The smallest aperture that I've seen NGC 1857 - and logged the observation - is through Canon 10x42 IS binos.  I could see a couple brighter stars surrounded by a glow.  Collinder 62 and NGC 1778 flanked the opposite sides of the field.  This was in a bright red zone of light pollution.

 

Mike



#8 Sarkikos

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 10:30 AM

Howdy all;

 

Here is a set of observations and a drawing of this cluster that is overhead now.  It does seem to get better with more aperture.

 

NGC 1857 TV 102 Antennas site  Seeing and Transparency=6/10, a mediocre night  14mm eyepiece faint, pretty small, not rich and somewhat compressed cluster that is poorly detached.  I can see 7 stars and a fuzzy background with direct vision and averted vision adds about 10 more stars and makes the cluster a little more prominent.  It is still not much in the 4 inch refractor.

 

NGC 1857 6" f/8 refractor Antennas S=6, T=8 14mm pretty bright, pretty large, pretty rich, pretty compressed, 29 stars counted of magnitude 7 and then 9 and fainter.  The central star is yellow, nice cluster.

 

NGC 1857 Nexstar 11 Messier Marathon S=7 T=5 125X pretty bright, pretty large, 25 stars mags 8, 10 and fainter.  Pretty well detached.  There is a nice curved chain of stars with a pretty bright orange star in the center.

 

NGC 1857 13" f/5.6 Newtonian  Sentinel site S=6, T=8 Bright and Rich.  Very nice at 165X, an 8th mag yellow star with several nice star chains radiating out from it.  45 members counted in about 12 minutes of cluster size.

 

NGC 1857 13" f/5.6 Granite Wash Mt. S=7 T=8 100X--easily seen as cluster.  150X--pretty bright, pretty large, pretty rich, somewhat compressed, 38 stars counted, including an 8th magnitude yellow star near center of cluster.  There are many faint members that are easier at high power, including several beautiful chains of stars.

 

Have fun;

Steve Coe

 

The drawing was made with the 13" scope at 165X:

 

attachicon.gifAUR_NGC 1857_13in_165X.jpg

Great observations and sketch.  I admire your patience.  I could never count stars resolved in a cluster.  I'm glad somebody does it.

 

:grin:

Mike



#9 stargzr66207

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 06:56 PM

My log book's entry, from long, long ago states: "10/13/85, 1:05 a.m., using Celestron 8 with 30mm Clave Plossl (66X): A loose and scattered cluster. 20 stars counted. Two brighter stars near center. Size approximately 10 arc minutes. Non-concentrated and does not stand out well."

 

Ron Abbott



#10 Sarkikos

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 08:21 PM

Another star counter!  :waytogo:   

 

This reminds me of the old story about leprechauns not being able to resist counting every grain of salt poured before them.

 

:grin:

Mike




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