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Suggested Books on Deep Sky Imaging?

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#1 Kenb196006

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 06:35 PM

On another thread, someone suggested the book Deep Sky Imaging Primer by Charles Bracken as a good source of information.  Are there any other books (or websites) that folks have found to be useful?  In particular, are there any newer books out there?  The link provided in the other thread indicated Deep Sky Imaging Primer was published in 2013, which isn't too old, but given the way things change so quickly, newer information is always good!  :lol:

 

Books on the image processing aspect of astrophotography are of the greatest interest to me, particularly those that aren't tied to specific software. 

 

Thanks,

 

Ken



#2 bobzeq25

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 07:42 PM

On another thread, someone suggested the book Deep Sky Imaging Primer by Charles Bracken as a good source of information.  Are there any other books (or websites) that folks have found to be useful?  In particular, are there any newer books out there?  The link provided in the other thread indicated Deep Sky Imaging Primer was published in 2013, which isn't too old, but given the way things change so quickly, newer information is always good!  :lol:

 

Books on the image processing aspect of astrophotography are of the greatest interest to me, particularly those that aren't tied to specific software. 

 

Thanks,

 

Ken

DSIP is basic theory, which hasn't changed since 2013 <smile>.  It's not about hardware or software.  The new very low read noise CMOS cameras have changed some things for those who use them, but DSIP is still my first choice book for recommending to people.  I don't know of any book that reflects the new cameras.

 

DSIP examples are Photoshop, but it discusses the underlying theory behind processing first.  It talks not only about what to do, but why you do it.  In that sense it is software independent, and, in my experience, unique.  I don't use Photoshop, didn't affect my appreciation of this book.

 

Bottom line.  Don't let 2013 stop you from getting it.  In my opinion, it's still the best.

 

The next step after DSIP is The Astrophotography Manual.  Slightly newer, more about hardware and software, more in depth.  Nice examples of real imaging projects and what went well, what not so well.  Newer, but will go out of date faster.  Complementary to DSIP, not a replacement.

 

https://www.amazon.c...h/dp/113877684X

 

Somewhat of a niche book, but has some excellent stuff.

 

https://www.amazon.c...ns from masters

 

Very software specific choice below.  If you're interested in processing, you have to be interested in PixInsight, for all its idiosyncrasies (especially in the user interface), it's by a healthy margin the most sophisticated image processing available.  This is a great introduction, but far more about what than why. Including more of the why would have made the book too heavy to pick up.  <smile>

 

https://www.amazon.c...side pixinsight


Edited by bobzeq25, 28 January 2017 - 07:53 PM.


#3 havasman

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 07:48 PM

http://www.astropix.com/bgda/bgda.html




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