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Constellations Lens Help!

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9 replies to this topic

#1 michael129

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 06:44 AM

Hi All!

 

I would like to know please what lens for canon 6d modded would be great for photographing A  constellation...?

Would like to see some results :)))

 

Big Thank's!!!

Michael 



#2 fishonkevin

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:27 AM

I have a few wide-field piggybacked images in my Flickr account( link in my sig).  You can get a feel there.  With a 50mm, you can get all of Orion.


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#3 michael129

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:48 AM

Thank's!

What i'm looking for is to get nice round stars in the constellation, not with spikes.

 

Michael



#4 SKYGZR

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 04:47 PM

Any lens used stopped down will spike the stars. The use of step down rings to stop down, while leaving the lens wide open, will eliminate the spikes.



#5 jforkner

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 06:15 PM

Don’t know if this will help, but here’s a RAW frame SOOC (i.e. no adjustments; just resized) of the Coathanger Asterism.  Not exactly a constellation, but close.  Taken with unmodded 6D & 100-400mm II lens @ 400mm, f/5.6, ISO 800, 90 sec. on a tracking mount.

 

 

Jack

 

_MG_3732-copy.jpg


Edited by jforkner, 15 March 2017 - 06:17 PM.


#6 whwang

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 11:11 PM

In general, it will be hard to make any useful suggestions to questions like this if the budget range is not specified.  I can easily recommend a Carl Zeiss lens that's guaranteed to be very good, but the recommendation will be probably not practical to many people.

 

Many modern lenses have nearly circular aperture blades.  Even after stopping down, they do not show very strong spikes.  But it will be still hard to find one that produces no spikes at all on bright stars after stopping down.

 

Cheers,

Wei-Hao



#7 Jerry Lodriguss

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 12:16 AM

Any lens used stopped down will spike the stars. The use of step down rings to stop down, while leaving the lens wide open, will eliminate the spikes.

On most constellations you are going to be using fairly wide-angle lenses and step-down rings won't work because they will vignette the image.

 

Jerry



#8 Jerry Lodriguss

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 12:21 AM

Hi All!

 

I would like to know please what lens for canon 6d modded would be great for photographing A  constellation...?

Would like to see some results smile.gif))

 

Big Thank's!!!

Michael 

Constellations come in all shapes and sizes from little ones that you can shoot with a longer focal length, to big ones that you need a wide-angle lens for.

 

There are 88 of them.

 

A lot of lenses need to be stopped down to get decent stars in the corners, and when you stop them down, you are going to get spikes from diffraction from the aperture blades in the lens.

 

You can look for some of the newer lenses that work well wide-open like the latest Rokinons. 

 

You will have to decide what focal length to get by deciding which constellations you want to shoot.

 

Jerry



#9 Samir Kharusi

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 06:07 AM

I would like to offer one warning. Do not be tempted to pay 3x as much for a faster f-ratio wide lens from the same stable, e.g. going for a Canon 50mm/1.4 rather than a 50mm/1.8, or a 28mm/1.8 instead of a 28mm/2.8. At the same focal length you will almost certainly find that both have to be closed down to a similar aperture (e.g. f4 for the 50mm and f5.6 for the 28mm pairs) hence all your extra $ is wasted.


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#10 Diane Miller

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 09:58 AM

I'm a newbie here, with my background being daylight photography, but I'll stick a toe in the water.  Last summer I wanted to shoot the galactic core and needed about 40-50mm on a full-frame body for the framing I wanted.  I had the "classic" Canon 24-70 f/2.8 (bought new and treated very carefully) and hated it even for full-frame daylight work due to degraded image quality in the lower corners.  (It came back from Canon as bench checks OK.)  So I rented the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art, which looked good on paper, but I had to stop it down to f/2.8 to get acceptable corner quality.  After that I sold my old 24-70 and got the newer one, the f/2.8 "II" model.  I only had a chance to use it a couple of times for wide-field star images, just to test it, but I'm delighted with the quality all the way to the corners, full-frame, wide open, throughout the zoom range.  Maybe I just have a very good copy, but I was surprised.  I'm looking forward to more testing when I have a chance to get to a more open site in Milky Way season.  

 

I've always preferred primes to zooms, but for the variably wide-field work of capturing constellations, if you're a Canon shooter, this zoom might be worth considering.

 

By comparison, I also have the new 100-400 II and love it for daylight work but find it disappointing for astro.  (The worst issues are with chromatic aberration and the triangular-shaped stars characteristic of pinched optics.  The latter is noticeable in daytime use in the small catchights in the eyes of animals.)  Again, it may be that there is a difference in different copies.




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