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Howie Glatter Parallizer - how does it work?

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8 replies to this topic

#1 Antares89

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:33 PM

I'm considering buying the 1.25 inch Glatter collimation tools due to my cheap Zhumell collimator not holding collimation. I plan to purchase a Parallizer to go along with the collimator and tublug. I've read about the Parallizer and I understand it maintains precise alignment between the eyepiece and draw tube. My question is, how does it do this exactly? I saw a video where Howie was explaining the two parallel straight edges principle but I'm kinda slow to catch on and was wondering if anyone could expand on the explanation. I have no doubt that the Parallizer works, I'd just like to better understand the theory behind it.

Thanks
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#2 havasman

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:43 PM

"The Parallizer™ 2 inch-to-1.25 inch adapter has a patented design that insures dead parallel alignment between a 2” drawtube and a 1.25” accessory. It works by clamping each cylindrical surface between two parallel straight edges, in order to secure stable alignment. It is like dropping a cylinder into a V-block : totally wiggle-free. The straight edges can be seen in the photo looking down the 1.25” barrel.

Because the inner and outer straight edges are parallel with each other to high accuracy, precision alignment between the drawtube and the accessory is assured. The adapter's non-marring clamp screw is set at 45 degrees, pushing the accessory down against the adapter flange when tightened."  - https://www.collimator.com/

 

above quoted from the Glatter Parallizer webpage where there are also good pictures

 

Or the short answer: VERY NICELY



#3 Antares89

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:51 PM

Thanks, I was just looking at those. Still having trouble visualizing how the parallel straight edges enforce alignment. It would probably help to hold one in my hand while inserting an eyepiece.


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#4 NOLAMusEd

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 02:53 PM

What's the aperture of your Zhumell dob? I have the Z12 and the collimation springs between the tube and mirror cell are wayyy too weak to hold good collimation. It's a joke to be honest that they ship these out with what I believe to be the same springs they use on the 8 and 10 inch models.

You can go to your local hardware store to buy some stiffer springs or just buy the farpoint springs online. They also sell upgraded collimation knobs made from anodized aluminum.

Better collimating tools may help you get a more precise alignment (more critical with faster scopes), but won't help the scope stay collimated when moving or in use.

Hope this helps though it's not really answering your original question about how HG's work but more addressing your statement that your Zhumell doesn't hold collimation well
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#5 rowdy388

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 04:21 PM

If you ever put your cheap laser collimator into a V-block to stabilize it

to see if the beam is off-center... the Parallizer works by a similar principle.

 

The outside ridges of the Parallizer squares the Parallizer adapter to the

focuser while the inside ridges squares the eyepiece to the Parallizer and

focuser. It is really simple but works great.

 

The Parallizer  also has added benefit of having zero offset so you don't

have the out-focus pentalty that other adapters have. It is also extra long

so you can put a 2" filter on the bottom and safety use your 1.25" eyepieces

without fear of the eyepiece barrels hitting the filter.



#6 Starman1

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:08 AM

A section of the outside of the adapter barrel is machined a tad smaller than 2", so that when the adapter is shoved toward that side when a thumbscrew is tightened on the adapter, what contacts the other side of the fouceer is the two edges of the slightly undercut section.  Got it?

 

The inside of the adapter has a small section machined out to larger than 1.25" so the eyepiece is also shoved against the two parallel edges of the inside of the adapter when a thumbscrew is tightened on the eyepiece.

 

In use, the thumbscrew that presses the adapter into a two-ridge contact with the other side of the focuser is 180° off from the screw that holds the eyepiece.

In essence, the eyepiece is shoved one way and the adapter is shoved the other, resulting in a centered position for the eyepiece (or collimation tool).



#7 Tom_m

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 05:46 PM

I also have a question about the Howie Glatter Parallizer in relation to eyepiecese.

I'd like to get one, but will my Morpheus eyepieces be able to sit in it normally?

How would the wide, flat surface that widens immediately at the end of the 1,25" part of the Morpheus be able to sit inside slanted, funnel like part of the parallizer?

Hmmm.... thinking1.gif



#8 rowdy388

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:20 PM

I also have a question about the Howie Glatter Parallizer in relation to eyepiecese.

I'd like to get one, but will my Morpheus eyepieces be able to sit in it normally?

How would the wide, flat surface that widens immediately at the end of the 1,25" part of the Morpheus be able to sit inside slanted, funnel like part of the parallizer?

Hmmm.... thinking1.gif

 

Have no fear. The Parallizer still works perfectly fine with Morpheus eyepieces.

The 2" barrel doesn't have to enter the funnel​. The 1.25" barrel is long enough

to square itself with the ridges inside the Parallizer. 

 

I asked this question a couple years ago when I noticed my Pentax XW

eyepieces were too wide at the top to seat inside the funnel.​ Howie Glatter

gave me the same answer I'm relaying to you.

 

I use my Morpheus in 1.25" mode with a Parallizer in my 2" focuser because

it is nearly parfocal in that mode with my other eyepieces. 

If I use the Morpheus in 2" mode I have to crank out my focuser several turns

in out focus.



#9 paradise

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 04:58 AM

The Parallizer simply gives a very good and sure alignment, from what you can reproduce your collimation.

 

I had a problem with my ES scope, the original reducer is not accurate, giving different results between Cheshire and laser, the only reducer that works fine is the Parallizer. cool.gif

 

With this one, from now I use a HG laser, 1 1/4" barrel, now I am a happy man ! waytogo.gif




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