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Anyone with plans to view the Total Solar Eclipse? (General Info Inside)

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#26 jforkner

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 08:21 AM

What motorized tracking mount are you using with your Canon 6d ?

 

Thanks 

I'll be using my Orion AstroView Equatorial Mount with Electronic Drive.  Camera mounted to matching dovetail bar.

 

Jack


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#27 Lord Beowulf

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 03:07 PM

So I'm planning to take my wedge for my 11" NexStar (although I've never put that one on it before).  My concern however is whether or not I can get a good enough polar alignment "blind" to make it better than just using alt-az mode and rotating the pictures to align them like I typically have to do for this sort of thing.  The problem I discovered there during the Mercury transit is that the Sun rotates a pretty good distance during the duration of the event, so the reference points (e.g. sunspots) that you'd use to align images are actually on the move themselves.

 

Beo


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#28 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 05:18 PM

Hi Everyone,

 

I will be trying to observe somewhere in the Southeast.  I have places reserved from mid-Tennessee to Eastern Missouri.  I've been to 3 total solar eclipses overseas and I do not want to miss one that is basically in my back yard.  Just wanted to mention that my experiences with eclipses has allowed me to develop the best mobile app available to help you time the eclipse.

 

I started a thread on my app with more in-depth information if you are interested.

 

https://www.cloudyni...-apps-are-done/

 

Thanks,

Gordon

www.solareclipsetimer.com


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#29 BrianThePrimate

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 01:17 AM

Yeah, I plan on heading to Hopkinsville too from Virginia to view the eclipse.  Though I plan on being flexible because of the weather.  If it is going to overcast, I will be prepared to move to the next best location where the weather is better... It is only a 8 hour drive for me which is not too bad.  I am using regular photography equipment.  I am remotely scouting locations that may make good compositions for photography.  

 

I plan on traveling from Ohio to Hopkinsville, Kentucky to view the Total Solar Eclipse on Aug 21 of this year. I was 7 years old the last time a total solar eclipse passed close enough to where I live that I could actually view it (1994). Of course, at that age and at that time, we didn't have anything beyond a crudely made pinhole projector. Now that I'm older, I appreciate these things much more to the point I'll be bringing along my family to share the event.

 

I was curious is anyone else had plans to view this epic event. If you plan on taking a trip, or are fortunate enough to live close to the path, what are your plans for the event? Will you be viewing through your telescope? Using special eye wear? Just curious what plans my fellow backyard astronomers have.

 

As for me, I've never viewed the Sun through a telescope. I own an AT72ED that could be fitted with a filter. Does anyone with a small Apo have a suggestion for which filter to use? I'm guessing a White Light filter like this from Astronomics would be enough to protect our eyes and view the sun/corona safely.

 

General solar Eclipse Info for Easy Access:

Top 10 Places to View the Eclipse (Space.com)

28 Page Slide Show about the Eclipse (Space.com)

How to Safely Observe the Sun  (Space.com)

Quick and Easy Viewing Techniques (Exploratorium.edu)

 

Cheers,

Odin


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#30 Tom Dugan

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 09:55 AM

My wife and I are flying to Denver, then driving back east to Nebraska. Traveling light. Definitely filtered naked eye-only for the eclipse.

 

It will rain.


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#31 Special Ed

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 01:21 PM

We'll be driving to Tennessee and plan to view the eclipse south of Knoxville.   I'm planning to bring my TV-76 with a white light filter and we'll have eclipse glasses as well. We'll make a side trip to visit the radio observatory at Green Bank as an added attraction. 

 

I'll be south of Knoxville, too--camping with family and friends at Indian Boundary in the Cherokee National Forest.  I'm bringing binoculars (with solar filters) and eclipse glasses. [Edit: and my PST]

 

You'll like Green Bank--great tours and an excellent visitors center.  It's about 60 miles north of me.  The Green Bank Star Quest will be July 19th-22nd.


Edited by Special Ed, 07 May 2017 - 06:42 AM.

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#32 ed_turco

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 01:37 PM

My wife and I will be traveling to Riverton, WY for an entire week leading up to the big shebang.   The people in this pop. 15000 town have NO idea how big the event will be and how it could conceivably double their population on the day of the eclipse.

 

As I have to travel with all sorts of handicapped paraphernalia, we are limited to some #14 welders glass for the eclipse.  Hopefully, there will be some folks with telescopes who will be star partying in the days up to the BIG DEAL.  Perhaps we can get a peek of something!

 

 

ed


Edited by ed_turco, 07 May 2017 - 01:05 PM.

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#33 Cajundaddy

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 02:23 PM

So I'm planning to take my wedge for my 11" NexStar (although I've never put that one on it before).  My concern however is whether or not I can get a good enough polar alignment "blind" to make it better than just using alt-az mode and rotating the pictures to align them like I typically have to do for this sort of thing.  The problem I discovered there during the Mercury transit is that the Sun rotates a pretty good distance during the duration of the event, so the reference points (e.g. sunspots) that you'd use to align images are actually on the move themselves.

 

Beo

It's not too tough with a little practice in advance.  Get your wedge set to your latitude, point your N tripod leg to true north with a compass or smartphone app, engage the drive and make a few AZ adjustments if needed.  After you have done it a few times you can get plenty close enough for short exposure shots.  The problem with a C11 is the focal length is really too long for great eclipse photos.  500mm-700mm is ideal.


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#34 Bryguy

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 09:20 PM

Heading to Nashville a few days early as my logistical starting point due to weather on eclipse day. I'm bringing a Lunt 60 DS, some binoculars with solar filters and a Bäader Herschel wedge for any extra scopes around us.  If it stays clear, I'd like to watch it from a local winery or Distillery to do some public outreach with the Lunt.

 

Here's a word of caution on traffic in the southern Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky areas.  That Saturday and Sunday traffic will already be extremely heavy due to the race in Bristol.  Then, Tuesday through Thursday traffic going through Virginia will be heavy due ton the Lockn Festival.


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#35 Rich_W

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 09:48 PM

Heading to Nashville a few days early as my logistical starting point due to weather on eclipse day. I'm bringing a Lunt 60 DS, some binoculars with solar filters and a Bäader Herschel wedge for any extra scopes around us.  If it stays clear, I'd like to watch it from a local winery or Distillery to do some public outreach with the Lunt.

 

Here's a word of caution on traffic in the southern Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky areas.  That Saturday and Sunday traffic will already be extremely heavy due to the race in Bristol.  Then, Tuesday through Thursday traffic going through Virginia will be heavy due ton the Lockn Festival.

Thanks for the heads up on Bristol. We'll be coming down on I-81 on the Saturday, hopefully it will at least keep moving even if heavy. 


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#36 BarrySimon615

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 05:54 PM

From the first post -

 

As for me, I've never viewed the Sun through a telescope. I own an AT72ED that could be fitted with a filter. Does anyone with a small Apo have a suggestion for which filter to use? I'm guessing a White Light filter like this from Astronomics would be enough to protect our eyes and view the sun/corona safely.

 

Your solar filter will be good for viewing or photographing the Sun during the partial phases of the eclipse leading up to totality, however if you leave it on your scope for the 2 minutes plus of totality, you will see or photograph "Nothing".

 

The corona is what you will see extending beyond the disc of the Sun which is being completely blocked by the Moon.  The Moon is now your filter and you can safely view or photograph the Sun without any filter and without harming your equipment or your eyes. However you have to stay focused.  2.5 minutes will race by as you are trying to view and/or photograph the Sun.  Take in what is going on around you, listen to the excitement being expressed by your friends, family and all the other people around you.  I assure you that you will hear a lot more than "Golly Gee".  All of this will add to the memory but it will be quite distracting in a very big way.

 

Back in July, 1991 I was on an eclipse cruise off the west coast of Mexico.  We had all carved out our little space of deck on the ship and we had about 1500 people on that deck.  This of course added to the excitement, the electricity in the air, and this coupled to the eclipse itself had the adrenaline going.  Little mistakes led to more mistakes and in the end you could always think of something that you would have done differently had you been given a second opportunity and this was for an eclipse that had a totality time of over 7 minutes, so almost 3 times as long as the one on August 21st.

 

In respect to anyone's plans I recommend being practical about what you want to accomplish in 2 to 2.5 minutes and then practice your plan, practice it again, and practice it again.  Not to be cruel, if observing with others, especially if you are running photographs and very much involved in your own plan, all have to know that if they have an equipment glitch or cannot solve a camera problem ------they are on their own.  There is really just not enough time to work out someone else's problem while you are working your own plan.  Back in 1984, we had an annular eclipse in the New Orleans area and it was a perfect day, no weather problems to be concerned about.  Two of my buddies were at a location, a small park, the national  media was there and it was crowded.  One of my friends, an older man, just before the start of the 13 seconds of the annular phase, knocked his telescope off target and called out for help just as the annular phase was starting.  My other friend was helpless in helping him as he had only 13 seconds to view the annular phase and take his own photographs.  So once again, practice, practice, practice.

 

Personally now that we are in the digital camera age I plan to take just a few photographs of the partial phases of the eclipse using a filtered telescope or camera lens, probably using either a Lunt wedge (white light) or h-alpha Coronado, I have not decided that yet.  I will have a tandem bar mounted on probably my AVX mount with one filtered camera for the partial phases.  Once totality begins I will just stop remotely tripping the shutter on this camera and begin tripping the shutter on the other camera.  This second camera will have no filter on it at all.  It will have a camera lens with an infinity focus which is truly infinity and it will be focused there with a well researched exposure time in manual mode.  It will have a black cloth over the front of the lens that will be quickly removed once totality starts.  I will trip the remote every 5 to 10 seconds or so, or maybe I will run a video thru the camera, I have not decided that just yet.  I will not be glued to the viewfinder as I was in 1991 with my trusty old Olympus OM-1n, those days are over.  I will be taking in the eclipse with my eyes.  I will listen to the excitement around me.  When it is evident that the Sun is emerging from behind the Moon, the cloth goes back on the camera lens and I will then block the front of the lens and put the lens cap back on it.  At this time I can go back to taking partial phase shots with the other camera on the mount.

 

3 of my friends and I will be viewing the eclipse from or near Jefferson City, MO, the state capital.  From our motel, which was booked a long time ago, totality will last about 2 minutes and 20 seconds.  If we travel north about 20 miles, we can squeeze about another 15 seconds or so out of totality.  Certainly a lot depends upon the weather and we are prepared to travel laterally along the eclipse path as much as  200 miles in either direction.  Because of that we have not made hotel reservations for a night on the way back home because our route home depends upon from where we view the eclipse.  We do have one overnight on the way up to Jefferson City in southern Missouri.  Interestingly I see that there will be a "Pink Floyd" tribute band in Jefferson City doing a Dark Side of the Moon concert the night before the eclipse.

 

At this point one of the hardest things to try to plan for (or around) besides alternate plans in the event of bad weather is to decide just what kind of crowd you want around you for the eclipse.  Don't get me wrong, a reasonable sized gathering is good because it adds to the excitement and the experience.  We had that on the eclipse cruise and it put electricity into the air, however those were mostly all amateur astronomers working their own plan.  The danger in being in a large gathering of people, many of whom are clueless, could cause problems ------standing right in front of your equipment, asking for looks thru a telescope with a working camera attached to it, accidently bumping equipment, etc., etc.  I would almost rather be invited to view the eclipse from a fenced backyard of a fellow amateur astronomer in Jefferson City, MO.  Hint! Hint!

 

Anyway, best of luck to all and practice, practice, practice!

 

Barry Simon


Edited by BarrySimon615, 08 May 2017 - 04:59 PM.

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#37 Lord Beowulf

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 07:36 AM

 

So I'm planning to take my wedge for my 11" NexStar (although I've never put that one on it before).  My concern however is whether or not I can get a good enough polar alignment "blind" to make it better than just using alt-az mode and rotating the pictures to align them like I typically have to do for this sort of thing.  The problem I discovered there during the Mercury transit is that the Sun rotates a pretty good distance during the duration of the event, so the reference points (e.g. sunspots) that you'd use to align images are actually on the move themselves.

 

Beo

It's not too tough with a little practice in advance.  Get your wedge set to your latitude, point your N tripod leg to true north with a compass or smartphone app, engage the drive and make a few AZ adjustments if needed.  After you have done it a few times you can get plenty close enough for short exposure shots.  The problem with a C11 is the focal length is really too long for great eclipse photos.  500mm-700mm is ideal.

 

The 11" will be configured for visual, which has a much wider FOV than the APS-C sensor.  The piggyback ED-80 will be running the imaging, and I plan to piggyback another camera either there or on my C8 with telephoto lens only.  I have a lot of experimentation to do before then, but setting up for "my" latitude isn't going to help me come the eclipse!  lol.gif 

 

Beo 


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#38 BarrySimon615

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 09:01 AM

 

 

So I'm planning to take my wedge for my 11" NexStar (although I've never put that one on it before).  My concern however is whether or not I can get a good enough polar alignment "blind" to make it better than just using alt-az mode and rotating the pictures to align them like I typically have to do for this sort of thing.  The problem I discovered there during the Mercury transit is that the Sun rotates a pretty good distance during the duration of the event, so the reference points (e.g. sunspots) that you'd use to align images are actually on the move themselves.

 

Beo

It's not too tough with a little practice in advance.  Get your wedge set to your latitude, point your N tripod leg to true north with a compass or smartphone app, engage the drive and make a few AZ adjustments if needed.  After you have done it a few times you can get plenty close enough for short exposure shots.  The problem with a C11 is the focal length is really too long for great eclipse photos.  500mm-700mm is ideal.

 

The 11" will be configured for visual, which has a much wider FOV than the APS-C sensor.  The piggyback ED-80 will be running the imaging, and I plan to piggyback another camera either there or on my C8 with telephoto lens only.  I have a lot of experimentation to do before then, but setting up for "my" latitude isn't going to help me come the eclipse!  lol.gif

 

Beo 

 

Beo,

 

Looking at your list of telescopes, you have some that would be more suitable than a C11 for capturing the eclipse.  Keep in mind that the eclipse, for most people will be taking place mid-day in August.  Accordingly there will be a lot of heat radiating up from the ground.  Less on grass, more on concrete or asphalt.  I assume that like most of us, you will be traveling to get to your eclipse viewing spot so you may not know just yet what surface you will be setting up on.

 

A schmidt-cassegrain is never the best recommendation for a solar eclipse.  I have 3 SCT's (6", 10" and 12") as well as a 5" Mak and they are all staying home.  As someone else told you, you do not need much focal length.  Only reason for a lot of focal length would be to drill down on a sunspot or two and you do not need an eclipse to do that.  I believe the recommendation was 500 mm to 700 mm focal length instruments.  If indeed you are doing a blind, compass directed polar alignment, as most of us will be doing, you will have some drift in both RA and Dec so correcting that out will take some concentration and distract you from other things you want to do.  I think your ED100 would be a much better choice for the partial phases and then a camera with lens that will give you at least a 2 degree field and as large as a 5 to 6 degree field for capturing the corona during totality.  A large field like this will be more than enough to keep the Sun from drifting out of the field due to a sub-optimal polar alignment given that totality will only last 2 minutes and 40 seconds at most from at or near the center line.

 

My current plan is a 80 mm scope with Lunt wedge and camera for the partial phases, a second DSLR with either a 200 mm, 300 mm or 400 mm lens to capture totality, and a 3rd point and shoot digital to shoot a video during totality.  All 3 will be bar mounted on a Celestron AVX.  The two cameras that will be capturing totality will be prefocused and ready to go once totality starts with lens caps off, but with the front of both cameras covered by a black cloth.  Totality starts and the cloth comes off, totality ends and the cloth goes back on.  I will be practicing my routine a number of times between now and August 21st.

 

Once again, I strongly recommend leaving the C11 at home.

 

See the attached photos that will show a representation as to just how the Sun with corona fits various field of view sizes.

 

Barry Simon

Attached Files


Edited by BarrySimon615, 08 May 2017 - 09:24 AM.

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#39 edremy

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 01:34 PM

 

I'm also heading to Nashville for the eclipse- renting a RV and hauling the family (and my new Lunt50) down with various stops along the way.

 

I have a reservation at an RV park just north of the city in the path of totality, but for folks in the area is there a place where viewing is good/people are gathering?  It would be nice to hang out with some other astro geeks

What park are you staying at?

 

Nashville North KOA.  It's technically in Goodlettesville, a bit south of the center of the track.  If there's a good place nearby where folks are gathering it would be sweet


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#40 prichardson

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 04:45 PM

...Take in what is going on around you, listen the excitement being expressed by your friends, family and all the other people around you...

 

 

Barry Simon

Thanks Barry.  This will be a strictly visual adventure for me (hopefully).  If me and my family are fortunate enough with the weather, then I'm good with just being there!  OK, well I may bring my AT72ED with a tripod and fluid head for views up to, and after totality.  But really just hoping for the experience.  Good luck to everybody!

 

Philip


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#41 Lord Beowulf

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 12:04 AM

 

 

 

So I'm planning to take my wedge for my 11" NexStar (although I've never put that one on it before).  My concern however is whether or not I can get a good enough polar alignment "blind" to make it better than just using alt-az mode and rotating the pictures to align them like I typically have to do for this sort of thing.  The problem I discovered there during the Mercury transit is that the Sun rotates a pretty good distance during the duration of the event, so the reference points (e.g. sunspots) that you'd use to align images are actually on the move themselves.

 

Beo

It's not too tough with a little practice in advance.  Get your wedge set to your latitude, point your N tripod leg to true north with a compass or smartphone app, engage the drive and make a few AZ adjustments if needed.  After you have done it a few times you can get plenty close enough for short exposure shots.  The problem with a C11 is the focal length is really too long for great eclipse photos.  500mm-700mm is ideal.

 

The 11" will be configured for visual, which has a much wider FOV than the APS-C sensor.  The piggyback ED-80 will be running the imaging, and I plan to piggyback another camera either there or on my C8 with telephoto lens only.  I have a lot of experimentation to do before then, but setting up for "my" latitude isn't going to help me come the eclipse!  lol.gif

 

Beo 

 

Beo,

 

Looking at your list of telescopes, you have some that would be more suitable than a C11 for capturing the eclipse.  Keep in mind that the eclipse, for most people will be taking place mid-day in August.  Accordingly there will be a lot of heat radiating up from the ground.  Less on grass, more on concrete or asphalt.  I assume that like most of us, you will be traveling to get to your eclipse viewing spot so you may not know just yet what surface you will be setting up on.

 

A schmidt-cassegrain is never the best recommendation for a solar eclipse.  I have 3 SCT's (6", 10" and 12") as well as a 5" Mak and they are all staying home.  As someone else told you, you do not need much focal length.  Only reason for a lot of focal length would be to drill down on a sunspot or two and you do not need an eclipse to do that.  I believe the recommendation was 500 mm to 700 mm focal length instruments.  If indeed you are doing a blind, compass directed polar alignment, as most of us will be doing, you will have some drift in both RA and Dec so correcting that out will take some concentration and distract you from other things you want to do.  I think your ED100 would be a much better choice for the partial phases and then a camera with lens that will give you at least a 2 degree field and as large as a 5 to 6 degree field for capturing the corona during totality.  A large field like this will be more than enough to keep the Sun from drifting out of the field due to a sub-optimal polar alignment given that totality will only last 2 minutes and 40 seconds at most from at or near the center line.

 

My current plan is a 80 mm scope with Lunt wedge and camera for the partial phases, a second DSLR with either a 200 mm, 300 mm or 400 mm lens to capture totality, and a 3rd point and shoot digital to shoot a video during totality.  All 3 will be bar mounted on a Celestron AVX.  The two cameras that will be capturing totality will be prefocused and ready to go once totality starts with lens caps off, but with the front of both cameras covered by a black cloth.  Totality starts and the cloth comes off, totality ends and the cloth goes back on.  I will be practicing my routine a number of times between now and August 21st.

 

Once again, I strongly recommend leaving the C11 at home.

 

See the attached photos that will show a representation as to just how the Sun with corona fits various field of view sizes.

 

Barry Simon

 

Thanks Barry, but again, if you read my previous post, the C11 WILL NOT BE USED FOR PHOTOGRAPHY.  It will be the mount carrying the ED80 that WILL be used for photography, and potentially also the piggyback camera lens.  On the other hand, the field of view with my focal reducer and binoviewer is sufficient for visual observing, especially since most of the viewing through the scope will occur during the non-totality.  I can't see having a crowd of people attempting to look through the scope during the couple of minutes that we'll have.  One thought that DID just occur to me is that if I do go with the wedge setup, I might actually try substituting my ED-80 for the bottom counterweight and put the ED-100 on top.  I'm not sure how it'd handle the load, but given we won't be slewing all over the place, it might actually be fine.  

 

Beyond that, I expect to have my CGEM sold by the end of the week, and don't plan to be hauling my CGE Pro around.  I'd have the same polar alignment issues there, and unless I want to drag my 5 and 6" Meade achros along, I wouldn't have enough OTAs for viewing and photography as planned.

 

Thanks,

 

Beo 


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#42 3snows

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 09:25 AM

 

 

I'm also heading to Nashville for the eclipse- renting a RV and hauling the family (and my new Lunt50) down with various stops along the way.

 

I have a reservation at an RV park just north of the city in the path of totality, but for folks in the area is there a place where viewing is good/people are gathering?  It would be nice to hang out with some other astro geeks

What park are you staying at?

 

Nashville North KOA.  It's technically in Goodlettesville, a bit south of the center of the track.  If there's a good place nearby where folks are gathering it would be sweet

 

I will be travelling with my family from Boston to Nashville and meeting up with a long time astronomer friend and his wife.  We are staying at this park as well.  Not sure where we'll end up watching the eclipse, perhaps right at the park.  There are some viewing locations in Nashville but we want to be mobile in case we need to move due to weather.


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#43 johnpd

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 08:37 PM

Hotels in or near the total path are now charging exorbitant rates for rooms during the time of the eclipse. One in Pocatello Idaho, which is outside but near the total path, as asking for $750/night. This is getting ridiculous.

 

JohnD


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#44 snow.drift

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 03:29 PM

Hopefully visiting Columbia, SC to see it but I'm still trying to find a proper hotel/AIRBNB to book :/


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#45 BarrySimon615

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 08:19 AM

I checked my reservation again last night.  It is absolutely locked in at $107.00 per night at the Fairfield Inn in Jefferson City, MO.  They still have a few rooms which are a single king size bed only at $179.00 per night.  (Fairfield Inn on West Truman Blvd.)

 

Barry Simon


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#46 jpbutler

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 08:54 AM

Checked my $40.00 a night reservation for a travel trailer hookup in Nebraska too.

Started to worry a little because of all the hysteria.

 

Reservation is good and they didn't seem to be too excited about the whole eclipse thing.

 

John


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#47 ShaulaB

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 09:39 PM

Husband and I live in Missouri, we are blessed with a large number of easy-to-drive-to places with totality.

 

The state capitol, Jefferson City, is in the mid-line of totality. So is Columbia, MO, where the big state university is located. If you can get to St. Louis, both of these towns are just a 2 hour drive away.

 

I hope you can join us and witness this awesome event!

Amy W


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#48 CCDMan

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 09:28 AM

I will be staying home. I know that sounds like I am uninterested.

 

Not really. I am lucky enough to have my house and my permanent observatory in

Central Oregon under the path of totality and I should get about 1 minute 18 seconds.

 

The difference in time between here and center line is not enough to put up with what

is sure to be the traffic jam of the century. We are about a mile off the highway leading

to both the Oregon Star party and the huge 30,000 person solar eclipse festival in the

Ochoco mountains (can you say "pot smoking music freaks"?).

 

http://oregoneclipse2017.com/

 

I have a bunch of astro- friends from all over the US coming over for a BBQ the day before

and some are coming back for the eclipse.

 

The biggest threats to viewing are things that folks not from here may not be thinking about.

 

One is forest fire, which can blot out the sun as well as close large areas of public land and

sometimes major highways. Late August is the peak for fire season and made worse by all

the eclipse visitors. Sometimes the smoke is so thick you could watch the partial naked eye.

The fire pictured from 2012 (about that time) would have totally screwed a lot of folks in the 

Madras area at times.

 

Sunset%20Fire.jpg

 

The other is thunderstorms. Not quite as much that time of the day but  some areas are more

likely to see those that others. Terrain creates "thunderstorm tracks" where they are more common.

 

I did not even think about the eclipse when I bought my place in the early 2000's - just lucky.

 

In any case, good luck to anyone coming to the area. Despite the risks of getting skunked, it is

still one of the better places.


Edited by CCDMan, 21 May 2017 - 09:29 AM.

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#49 Odin Exodus

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 10:48 AM

Hotels in or near the total path are now charging exorbitant rates for rooms during the time of the eclipse. One in Pocatello Idaho, which is outside but near the total path, as asking for $750/night. This is getting ridiculous.

 

JohnD

The hotels in KY I was looking at were starting at $400/night. I didn't book. 

 

Looking at the extended forecast, they're calling for heavy clouds and possible thunderstorms in that area. Glad I didn't book at the time.



#50 Odin Exodus

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 10:52 AM

 

Yeah, I plan on heading to Hopkinsville too from Virginia to view the eclipse.  Though I plan on being flexible because of the weather.  If it is going to overcast, I will be prepared to move to the next best location where the weather is better... It is only a 8 hour drive for me which is not too bad.  I am using regular photography equipment.  I am remotely scouting locations that may make good compositions for photography.  

 

I plan on traveling from Ohio to Hopkinsville, Kentucky to view the Total Solar Eclipse on Aug 21 of this year. I was 7 years old the last time a total solar eclipse passed close enough to where I live that I could actually view it (1994). Of course, at that age and at that time, we didn't have anything beyond a crudely made pinhole projector. Now that I'm older, I appreciate these things much more to the point I'll be bringing along my family to share the event.

 

I was curious is anyone else had plans to view this epic event. If you plan on taking a trip, or are fortunate enough to live close to the path, what are your plans for the event? Will you be viewing through your telescope? Using special eye wear? Just curious what plans my fellow backyard astronomers have.

 

As for me, I've never viewed the Sun through a telescope. I own an AT72ED that could be fitted with a filter. Does anyone with a small Apo have a suggestion for which filter to use? I'm guessing a White Light filter like this from Astronomics would be enough to protect our eyes and view the sun/corona safely.

 

General solar Eclipse Info for Easy Access:

Top 10 Places to View the Eclipse (Space.com)

28 Page Slide Show about the Eclipse (Space.com)

How to Safely Observe the Sun  (Space.com)

Quick and Easy Viewing Techniques (Exploratorium.edu)

 

Cheers,

Odin

 

Looks like the extended forecast is showing heavy clouds. It's an 8.5 hour drive for me (no stops), and at this point I'm not so sure I want to take that trip, especially if the weather isn't going to cooperate. 




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