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Solar eclipse 2017

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#1 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:22 PM

Where do you plan to view, and will you see totality?

#2 Richard O'Neill

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:28 PM

Kentucky, weather gods permitting. wink.gif



#3 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:34 PM

I live in Wilmington, N.C. how far into south Carolina do I need to travel for totality? How much of the eclipse can I expect to see if I don't travel and stay in Wilmington,N.C? Latitude and longitude is 34.225727, 77.944710.

#4 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:35 PM

Kentucky, weather gods permitting. wink.gif



#5 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:36 PM

Yeah I hear that definatly weather permitting😛

#6 DuDuLook

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:38 PM

We are driving 10 hours from Northern California to Oregon coast for it. Hopefully it doesn't rain on that day in Oregon....



#7 Scott in NC

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:44 PM

I live in Wilmington, N.C. how far into south Carolina do I need to travel for totality? How much of the eclipse can I expect to see if I don't travel and stay in Wilmington,N.C? Latitude and longitude is 34.225727, 77.944710.

Jacquie, take a look at this map: https://www.greatame...pse.com/nation/

 

In Wilmington, NC, you'll be quite far away from the line of totality, but will still get to experience 96% coverage.



#8 Bob4BVM

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:50 PM

My backyard, near Stayton, Oregon

Yup, 2+ minutes  :) :)

 

CS

Bob


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#9 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:07 PM


I live in Wilmington, N.C. how far into south Carolina do I need to travel for totality? How much of the eclipse can I expect to see if I don't travel and stay in Wilmington,N.C? Latitude and longitude is 34.225727, 77.944710.

Jacquie, take a look at this map: https://www.greatame...pse.com/nation/

In Wilmington, NC, you'll be quite far away from the line of totality, but will still get to experience 96% coverage.


#10 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:07 PM

Scott do you plan to trAvel closer to totality?

#11 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:08 PM

Scott do you plan to trAvel closer to totality?

#12 Scott in NC

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:13 PM

Depending upon the weather, I may go for a drive to SC that day, as the line of totality is a 2.5-hr drive away from my home at its closest point.



#13 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:13 PM

I remember the eclipse in 1970 I was 7 and we made little viewing boxes so you could see the shadow eclipse the small SC in in the box

#14 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:15 PM

Think it's about the same for me

#15 Scott in NC

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:15 PM

I remember the eclipse in 1970 I was 7 and we made little viewing boxes so you could see the shadow eclipse the small SC in in the box

Where did you see it in 1970?



#16 jacquie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:21 PM

New Jersey,
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#17 bobzeq25

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:50 PM

I live in Wilmington, N.C. how far into south Carolina do I need to travel for totality? How much of the eclipse can I expect to see if I don't travel and stay in Wilmington,N.C? Latitude and longitude is 34.225727, 77.944710.

You'll see less than 1% of it.  Really.  Totality is a completely different thing.



#18 Sky Muse

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 10:09 PM

I'll see about 90% of totality from my home.  The last time I witnessed an eclipse, it was partial, and as though the Sun had been turned down a bit with a dimmer switch.  It was a noticeably different effect than when clouds pass over, and I knew at the time that it wasn't that at all, almost immediately.  The dimming had an evenness, a smoothness, about it.  That was back sometime in '83 to '86, and when I had lived at another location during said years.  It was too cool.  This time it should be even better.


Edited by Sky Muse, 25 April 2017 - 10:18 PM.


#19 Cajundaddy

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 11:47 PM

Guys, if there is any way to get there, see totality!  A partial eclipse is cute but sorta like kissing your sister.  Experiencing totality is about 1000x more interesting and even emotionally moving for many.  Just do it while it is coming to a neighborhood near you.  You will be glad you did.

 

We will be in eastern Oregon/western Idaho in an RV with our final observing site chosen based on weather and potential wildfires in the area.

 

This is kinda long but a great primer by one of the most experienced eclipse observers.

https://www.youtube....KnxE6yAuI&t=10s


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#20 JMW

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 01:19 AM

Got a pair of reservations for the Oregon Star Party. Plan to spend a week to enjoy the dark skies.



#21 BrooksObs

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 09:06 AM

Echoing a few of the preceding posters, I can concur that witnessing a totality in a clear sky is unlike anything else that you will ever experience and by contrast even viewing a 95-97% partial is absolutely nothing. I've seen 4 total, 1 total/annular, and 1 annular eclipse over the years, each one in a clear sky and the events I witnessed - and that are not even hinted at during deep partial eclipses, are amazing.

 

Just to offer a somewhat incomplete rundown of the unique phenomena one experiences, once passed the 90% phase you notice that your surrounding take on an increasingly very strange even unearthly aspect. The overall color of the landscape grows increasingly yellowish, while shadows become very sharply defined, along with everything around you. At around the 95% phase a light breeze will often spring up and by 98% everything around you has become very dull and dark. If you glance to your west you see that the sky itself is growing strikingly dark in that direction, like some approaching yet cloudless thunderstorm and this "darkness" can be seen to be rising slowly ever higher in the western sky! 

 

After 99% you note that all the sounds of nature - birds, animals, insects - have all ceased and the light itself is rapidly going out of the sky, itself having become bluer than you've ever seen it before. In last 45 seconds before the onset of totality even the breeze dies out and everything is silence! Nearly all viewers, no matter how experienced, report a chill of primitive fear run up their spine as the light in the sky and terrain dies out as if someone were turning down a giant rheostat. Looking at your surrounding may show errie rippling bands of light and dark racing across the ground, or on the walls of buildings. A glance to your west shows a gigantic dark mass in that portion of the sky. It can be seen moving upward higher and higher in the heavens literally from moment to moment! Its leading edge grows very sharp and in the last seconds before totality it appears as if an enormous dark drapery is being drawn across the heavens...and as it touches the sun the eclipse is total!

 

Now I'm going stop here to leave you first-timers hanging and not describe the wonderous sights you will behold in the following minutes within totality and spoil your fun, but the events of totality are even more amazing than the run up before it...especially if you can force yourself away from looking only at the eclipsed sun and turn yourself around full circle every 30 seconds, or so, to see what's happening. 

 

BrooksObs 


Edited by BrooksObs, 26 April 2017 - 09:14 AM.

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#22 REC

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:01 AM

Colombia, SC or Clemson SC, still up in the air. Need plan A and B because of the weather.



#23 Tonk

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:46 AM

I've seen 3 total eclipses, 2 annular and many partial eclipses and can say that annular and partial are absolutely nothing in comparison to the experience of a total eclipse. So it you can get to see it total - absolutely do it.

There is so much subtle stuff going during total eclipse that it may take observing more than one to get to appreciate all the effects. The last one I experienced (2009 off coast of Iwo Jima) I spent the middle 3 minutes of the 6+ minutes of totality looking at the far horizon and what the moon shadow was doing on far off cloud banks. If its your first you really should look at the solar corona and prominences - you don't see these with partial or annular eclipses


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#24 Don W

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 11:25 AM

York, Nebraska, Holiday Inn.


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#25 deSitter

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 11:53 AM

Snake River Valley, Idaho.

 

-drl


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