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My Carl Zeiss Winkel Microscope

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#1 shooze

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 12:17 AM

I picked this Carl Zeiss Winkel stereo microscope up a few years back on an online sale website…  needs a bit of cleaning, but in very good condition.  It came with another body and extra optical parts, and the transformer illumination system as well.  Also, an interesting set of medical lab slides of various items to view.

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Edited by shooze, 05 May 2017 - 12:34 AM.

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#2 Binojunky

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 09:37 AM

Not knowing a lot about Microscopes even though I have a couple in the house I can see this is a quality item, nice to see the older stuff, Dave , Ontario.
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#3 shooze

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 01:09 PM

Not knowing a lot about Microscopes even though I have a couple in the house I can see this is a quality item, nice to see the older stuff, Dave , Ontario.

Yes Dave, very well made and very heavy - I think it is mostly brass, coated with a black enamel finish.  The micrometer focuser is very fine.  I showed this to a 95 year old surgeon friend of mine - his response was "that is a very good scope, those were found only in high end laboratories and hospitals in my early days"


Edited by shooze, 05 May 2017 - 01:11 PM.


#4 Binojunky

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 09:37 AM

 

Not knowing a lot about Microscopes even though I have a couple in the house I can see this is a quality item, nice to see the older stuff, Dave , Ontario.

Yes Dave, very well made and very heavy - I think it is mostly brass, coated with a black enamel finish.  The micrometer focuser is very fine.  I showed this to a 95 year old surgeon friend of mine - his response was "that is a very good scope, those were found only in high end laboratories and hospitals in my early days"

 

Droooooooooooooooooooooolbow.gif  Dave.


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#5 Microscopy

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 10:08 AM

Congratualations!

You're the (proud, no doubt) owner of thé most iconic microscope ever made in continental Europe: the Zeiss Winkel Standard GF, also known as the "Zeiss Oberkochen Standard GF", from the German town were these stands were build.
It's commonly known as the "Zeiss (Standard) GFL" as well, with "L" ("Leuchte") meaning build in 6V - 15W illumination.

This line of Zeiss microscopes was produced between midst the 1950's up to the late 1960's, when they were replaced by the well known grey and beige Zeiss Standards RA, 14, 16, 18, 20.

There were at the time three versions of this stand: the Standard G, the Standard GF and the Standard K.

The "G"  (from "Grösstrieb", coarse focussing mechanism) only had a coarse focussing knob, the "GF" (from "Grösstrieb-Feintrieb") had a coaxial coarse-fine focussing system like yours, the "K" had a combined coarse-fine focussing system, pretty much as the one used in another popular stand of around that era: the Leitz "SM" ("SchülerMikroskop").

Over the years, some variants appeared: with/without removable nosepiece and such.

The GF was at the time the smallest Zeiss stand, designed for heavy profesional use. It was expensive (think a few average monthly wages).
The G was intended to be used by demanding amateur microscopists and schools, serving more or less the needs of the same audience that would have bought their entry level stand: the "Zeiss Standard Junior K(F)".
Further up the line up was the rather heavy and large "Standard WL", followed by a real beast that left absolutely nothing to desire: the "Photomikroskop" and the even huger monster: the "Ultraphot".

I own a GF as well. It's a great microscope and they can, sometimes, when one is lucky, be bougt very cheap, at least in the monocular version. It's all one hopes for in a microscope: heavy, sturdy, reliable, superb optics.

Probably interesting for you to know: the GF was designed to be used as a real "platform": nearly all parts from Zeiss can be used on your stand.
At that time (things have changed since then...) Zeiss took "backward compatibility" very seriously: most parts of the later grey and beige Standards can be used on the GF as well.

Advice: treat it well. And literally: carry it as a baby. The focussing controls move the limb and the tube, contrary to later designs where the focussing controls move the stage. Always one hand on the limb, the other hand supporting the foot.

I noticed in the first picture that yours is equipped with the N.A. 1.3 condenser. This is a very well corrected, high grade system, worth in itself quite some money as it is in high demand, these days.
The condenser with which the microsope was equipped in the basic version had a removable lens at the back, intended to enlarge the cone of light to provide illumination of the entire FOV at low magnifications.
The upper lens of the condenser swinged in/out trough a lever underneath the condenser. These original condensers are in high demand as well.


Edited by Microscopy, 30 August 2017 - 10:09 AM.

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#6 shooze

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 10:26 AM

Congratualations!

You're the (proud, no doubt) owner of thé most iconic microscope ever made in continental Europe: the Zeiss Winkel Standard GF, also known as the "Zeiss Oberkochen Standard GF", from the German town were these stands were build.
It's commonly known as the "Zeiss (Standard) GFL" as well, with "L" ("Leuchte") meaning build in 6V - 15W illumination.

This line of Zeiss microscopes was produced between midst the 1950's up to the late 1960's, when they were replaced by the well known grey and beige Zeiss Standards RA, 14, 16, 18, 20.

There were at the time three versions of this stand: the Standard G, the Standard GF and the Standard K.

The "G"  (from "Grösstrieb", coarse focussing mechanism) only had a coarse focussing knob, the "GF" (from "Grösstrieb-Feintrieb") had a coaxial coarse-fine focussing system like yours, the "K" had a combined coarse-fine focussing system, pretty much as the one used in another popular stand of around that era: the Leitz "SM" ("SchülerMikroskop").

Over the years, some variants appeared: with/without removable nosepiece and such.

The GF was at the time the smallest Zeiss stand, designed for heavy profesional use. It was expensive (think a few average monthly wages).
The G was intended to be used by demanding amateur microscopists and schools, serving more or less the needs of the same audience that would have bought their entry level stand: the "Zeiss Standard Junior K(F)".
Further up the line up was the rather heavy and large "Standard WL", followed by a real beast that left absolutely nothing to desire: the "Photomikroskop" and the even huger monster: the "Ultraphot".

I own a GF as well. It's a great microscope and they can, sometimes, when one is lucky, be bougt very cheap, at least in the monocular version. It's all one hopes for in a microscope: heavy, sturdy, reliable, superb optics.

Probably interesting for you to know: the GF was designed to be used as a real "platform": nearly all parts from Zeiss can be used on your stand.
At that time (things have changed since then...) Zeiss took "backward compatibility" very seriously: most parts of the later grey and beige Standards can be used on the GF as well.

Advice: treat it well. And literally: carry it as a baby. The focussing controls move the limb and the tube, contrary to later designs where the focussing controls move the stage. Always one hand on the limb, the other hand supporting the foot.

I noticed in the first picture that yours is equipped with the N.A. 1.3 condenser. This is a very well corrected, high grade system, worth in itself quite some money as it is in high demand, these days.
The condenser with which the microsope was equipped in the basic version had a removable lens at the back, intended to enlarge the cone of light to provide illumination of the entire FOV at low magnifications.
The upper lens of the condenser swinged in/out trough a lever underneath the condenser. These original condensers are in high demand as well.

Very interesting.  Thanks so much for this information, I had a tough time finding anything on this scope.  I also have a box full of extra parts and light bulbs for the illuminator as well.  I will look through those and post pictures shortly.

Again, many thanks!



#7 Microscopy

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 06:27 AM

You're welcome.

 

Here's a leaflet on the GFL: http://www.mikroskop...kroskop GFL.pdf
And here's the user manual of the GFL/WL: http://www.amuseum.d...skope_small.pdf

 

Both in German

 

In English: https://drive.google...mw2M2dNNWM/view.


Edited by Microscopy, 31 August 2017 - 06:30 AM.

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#8 shooze

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 04:28 PM

You're welcome.

 

Here's a leaflet on the GFL: http://www.mikroskop...kroskop GFL.pdf
And here's the user manual of the GFL/WL: http://www.amuseum.d...skope_small.pdf

 

Both in German

 

In English: https://drive.google...mw2M2dNNWM/view.

 

Again, so many thanks!!



#9 shooze

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 07:22 PM

Here are two more shots of my microscope.

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#10 Microscopy

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 06:45 AM

Nice.

Yours is in far better cosmetical condition than mine.

I suppose mine is a lot older. It has seen many, many years of heavy use in a veterinary lab and it shows it's age.

It was used exclusively for rooster sperm evaluation.

When the lab closed down (8 people lost their job...), every employee was allowed to "choose something to take home as a souvenenir".

The lady-receptionist chose the microscope.

 

Some years later, she put it up for sale as: "probably not working. Perhaps usable as a decoration piece for a physician or a vet?".

It was cheap (40 Euro's) so I bought it immediatly. It turned out to be still in working order.

 

Going trough my boxes of junk, I found a phase condenser of that era, which I bought a long time ago dead cheap as: "for spare parts only". It turned out to be only missig the ball bearing ball of the rotating phase revolver. A repair of a few Eurocents.

I still had a set of Zeiss phase achromats, a binoculair tube of that era and a few CPL-eyepieces, so... Ready to go.

Zeis GFL.jpg

Zeis-Winkel PC-01.jpg

Zeis-Winkel PC-02.jpg


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#11 wrnchhead

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 02:18 PM

Microscopy, that's an interesting story and an this is an interesting thread overall. I wonder how many people have doodads laying around that they just have for the decorative value instead of understanding it's true worth. I have the astrocompass out of a B-17, which I do not know how to properly use (have looked at the manual, my math is too weak) but I do appreciate it's historical value, and I do keep it cleaned up and love taking it down to show someone. 

 

Very lucky for the original poster that someone with knowledge stumbled on this thread with so much useful information and links to manuals! 


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#12 shooze

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 01:44 PM

Microscopy, that's an interesting story and an this is an interesting thread overall. I wonder how many people have doodads laying around that they just have for the decorative value instead of understanding it's true worth. I have the astrocompass out of a B-17, which I do not know how to properly use (have looked at the manual, my math is too weak) but I do appreciate it's historical value, and I do keep it cleaned up and love taking it down to show someone. 

 

Very lucky for the original poster that someone with knowledge stumbled on this thread with so much useful information and links to manuals! 

Yes, I am lucky and very thankful for the information. Now to restore this beauty.



#13 NGC704

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 08:07 PM

Restore it? What needs restoring? Looks to me like all that baby needs a careful detailed cleaning. Maybe a little clean & relube here and there as well.

 

I'm also the proud owner and user of a vintage "black beauty" Zeiss, only mine's a WL stand converted to 100W lamp.

 

8-16-16%204185_lzn_zpsckncfnw0.jpg


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#14 shooze

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 08:14 PM

Very nice.  All I meant was a good cleaning and a lubrication.  It's in good condition.  Not too sure how to handle lubrication, I also need to look into lens cleaning, etc.

 

 

Restore it? What needs restoring? Looks to me like all that baby needs a careful detailed cleaning. Maybe a little clean & relube here and there as well.

 

I'm also the proud owner and user of a vintage "black beauty" Zeiss, only mine's a WL stand converted to 100W lamp.

 

8-16-16%204185_lzn_zpsckncfnw0.jpg

 




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