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Edmund Scientific Telescopes Experiences

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#51 Paul Rini

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 02:56 PM

A Jaegers made some different focal lengths of the 102mm diameter size. I made a f/8 (if not mistaken.....many years ago)using the Edmund 4" original cell, cut down original Edmund unpainted aluminum tube and the pushed machined aluminum tube dew/light shield plus Edmunds 2" rack and pinion which was used on their 6" F/10 reflector.


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#52 Paul Rini

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 03:02 PM

In 1957 Norman Edmund started Edmund Salvage Company using WWll surplus. Shortly after around 1962, later changed the name to Edmund Scientific which every body knows that name. Robert Edmund in the 1980's try the name Edmund Optics which I think still remains on their company sign outside the Barrington, NJ manufacturing facility.


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#53 Paul Rini

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 03:11 PM

While looking at the above picture the reflector/fork mount there was one fault not know to many......the fork base or tripod cap has a hole and there should be a threaded rod which goes thru the tripod leg intersection and this holds the fork mount securely. If not, especially on the 8" f/5 series then the fork comes off the tripod and the red tube hits the tripod and the tube being phenolic then it cracked.

 

To try and tackle this when the buyer doesn't use the rod, Edmund tried using a company in or near the Camden County College (that building has been demolished many years ago) and Edmund decided to use machined black plastic pipe. This did help the problem when the buyer forgot to use the center rod. This is when the 3" F/6 reflector was made with the machined black plastic pipe for the main 3" telescope tube. The name of the high density black plastic escapes me at this time but the small fittings are still available in many large hardware stores.  


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#54 Paul Rini

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 03:16 PM

One page back is shown an Edmund red tube series 6" F/6 reflector which the earlier models had phenolic material for the main tube. Later this tube was changed to the stronger (as in density but not elongation) machined black pipe.



#55 Messierthanwhat

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 08:03 AM

Just an extra word being around the Edmund Store.....a year or 2 ago Edmund didn't renew the 25 year patent for the Astroscan so Bushnell was ready to go as soon as midnight hit. Clear skies, paul

As I get older, I notice events that seem like "a year or 2 ago" were actually a decade ago and more. I wonder if this is one of those age-condensed recollections. Bushnell has been selling its Astroscan knock-off - also called "Voyager" - for way more than a couple of years. shocked.gif

 

Also, from the mention of renewing and the name Bushnell chose, I suspect they were referring to a trademark registration, rather than a patent. Some, like drug patents, can be extended (to compensate for the lengthy FDA approval process), but a patent generally can't be renewed. That would undercut the purpose for which they're constitutionally authorized.

 

OK, sorry for the OT trivia. In case its mention in the classics ads thread was overlooked, there is a Voyager refractor on the Goodwill auction site at the moment. I'd probably be bidding on it myself, but one more telescope arriving at my door might require a liquidation sale to pay for a divorce lawyer.


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#56 Bomber Bob

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 10:51 AM

My tribute to the Voyager series:

 

Edmund DK4 S304 - OTA Complete (Mounted).jpg

 

I am absolutely thrilled with the performance of this 1974 Edmund (3B) 4" F15 D-K Cassegrain.  Very first views in mediocre seeing were spot on.  No lie, it's a serious challenger to my 1958 Questar, and trumps my 1980s Kenko 125C Corrected D-K Cass on lunar / planetary, though the F8 CDK does better on lower power wide-field views (as expected).

 

Edmund sold great stuff.  And, it took me only 40 years to realize it.


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#57 orion61

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 11:56 AM

  Every time I think about Edmund I get that same twisted gut feeling I do with Radio Shack.. Our last one closed last month.

I then think about todays kids and see them with heads stuck in a Smart phone all day, I wonder about things 50 years from now. 

When I was young I loved to tear things apart and put them back together to see how they worked.

   BUT on the bright side I went to Barns and Noble and was amazed at the resurgence of Vinyl LPs!!!!!  Rows and rows of them!!!

Finally found brand new albums to replace my "listened to death" Beatles White Album and SGT PEPPER.....yes I'm a Pepper too.!

My spending big bucks to have my Marantz /Pioneer system and Teac Reel to Reel system completely restored to as new condition

is becoming worth the NAGGING I got back in 2010!

Love & Respect to all,

Du'

 

PS:

GREAT pics of those classic ES scopes!.. 

My first scope was a 3" White tube Edmund Reflector on an AZ/Alt mount; I got it on Payments from my English teacher.

It was still in the wooden box!


Edited by orion61, 13 June 2017 - 12:13 PM.

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#58 Terra Nova

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 01:47 PM

"I then think about todays kids and see them with heads stuck in a Smart phone all day, I wonder about things 50 years from now. When I was young I loved to tear things apart and put them back together to see how they worked."

 

Kids today still do that, it's just that they do it now with Legos and computer code.


Edited by terraclarke, 13 June 2017 - 01:48 PM.

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#59 bremms

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 03:14 PM

Yes Terra.. Problem is, if the know how to build complex items like computer chips and many other high tech items is lost, It's lost. You can look at a computer chip and maybe see how it works in principle. You could never make one without the knowledge and manufacturing base that was built up over decades.


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#60 Augustus

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 05:41 PM

My Super Space Conqueror (with replacement mirrors) is quite a nice scope but the GEM is heavy, can't be aligned accurately, and has no drives - hence why I haven't used the scope since acquiring my 8" SCT. I'm contemplating putting it on a Dob mount using the two bolts in the OTA.


Edited by Augustus, 13 June 2017 - 05:42 PM.

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#61 Terra Nova

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 06:33 PM

Yes Terra.. Problem is, if the know how to build complex items like computer chips and many other high tech items is lost, It's lost. You can look at a computer chip and maybe see how it works in principle. You could never make one without the knowledge and manufacturing base that was built up over decades.

I think it is out of touch and cynical to think that there are no kids in this country learning the requisite skills to advance American science and technology. Kids still tinker with things, take things apart and put things together. They just do it differently, with different toys and technology. Times have changed! We didn't learn to shoe horses, knap flint, or start fire by rubbing two sticks together but we did alright. 


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#62 bremms

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 07:00 PM

 

Yes Terra.. Problem is, if the know how to build complex items like computer chips and many other high tech items is lost, It's lost. You can look at a computer chip and maybe see how it works in principle. You could never make one without the knowledge and manufacturing base that was built up over decades.

I think it is out of touch and cynical to think that there are no kids in this country learning the requisite skills to advance American science and technology. Kids still tinker with things, take things apart and put things together. They just do it differently, with different toys and technology. Times have changed! We didn't learn to shoe horses, knap flint, or start fire by rubbing two sticks together but we did alright. 

 

Oh there are plenty of young that can do and understand anything we can. But there are things we make that would be nearly impossible to reverse engineer if we didn't already have the skills. If we did find an alien spacecraft, we may understand the mechanisms but building  one may be far beyond our knowledge and capabilities.


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#63 deSitter

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 04:42 PM

  Every time I think about Edmund I get that same twisted gut feeling I do with Radio Shack.. Our last one closed last month.

I then think about todays kids and see them with heads stuck in a Smart phone all day, I wonder about things 50 years from now. 

When I was young I loved to tear things apart and put them back together to see how they worked.

   BUT on the bright side I went to Barns and Noble and was amazed at the resurgence of Vinyl LPs!!!!!  Rows and rows of them!!!

Finally found brand new albums to replace my "listened to death" Beatles White Album and SGT PEPPER.....yes I'm a Pepper too.!

My spending big bucks to have my Marantz /Pioneer system and Teac Reel to Reel system completely restored to as new condition

is becoming worth the NAGGING I got back in 2010!

Love & Respect to all,

Du'

 

PS:

GREAT pics of those classic ES scopes!.. 

My first scope was a 3" White tube Edmund Reflector on an AZ/Alt mount; I got it on Payments from my English teacher.

It was still in the wooden box!

This is the best time ever for equipment - for very little money you can get high-performance optics and mechanics. No comparison to the 60s at all. The focusers on my two top scopes are things of mechanical beauty and perfection that were just not available until the modern era when CNC machining came into wide use. Optics can be machine made to great precision. Good stuff is so widespread that it's hard to remember what goes into even the cheapest real telescope.

 

-drl


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#64 Paul Rini

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 02:47 PM

Edmund Scientific Dates: There is a correction from my last entry about times/dates. I just got the new Edmund catalog with the new owners and the Edmund time started in 1942 as Edmund Salvage. The included picture is a copy from a 1947 dated Popular Science Magazine which shows one of Edmund's ads. 

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#65 Paul Rini

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 02:52 PM

My tribute to the Voyager series:

 

attachicon.gifEdmund DK4 S304 - OTA Complete (Mounted).jpg

 

I am absolutely thrilled with the performance of this 1974 Edmund (3B) 4" F15 D-K Cassegrain.  Very first views in mediocre seeing were spot on.  No lie, it's a serious challenger to my 1958 Questar, and trumps my 1980s Kenko 125C Corrected D-K Cass on lunar / planetary, though the F8 CDK does better on lower power wide-field views (as expected).

 

Edmund sold great stuff.  And, it took me only 40 years to realize it.

Edmund Scientific's All About Telescopes by Sam Brown has the optical drawing of this DK plus various mounting ideas but only in the later issues. I wonder if a picture of that particular page can be added in this forum? 



#66 Bomber Bob

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 03:36 PM

I have the 1967 edition.  The example Cass on page 189 is a 6" version.

 

All About Telescopes (Cover) S01.jpg


Edited by Bomber Bob, 22 June 2017 - 03:37 PM.

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#67 Paul Rini

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 10:43 AM

That is the same edition I have with the same condition...lots of useage. There is a newer edition with the small DK as shown by the completed OTA. These Sam Brown books are still available. I do have the almost entire set of the individual editions like "Telescope Mounts" "Photography With Your Telescope" and so on which was combined into the "All About Telescopes".

 

I have the 1967 edition.  The example Cass on page 189 is a 6" version.

 

attachicon.gifAll About Telescopes (Cover) S01.jp


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#68 deSitter

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 08:47 AM

I have the 1967 edition.  The example Cass on page 189 is a 6" version.

 

attachicon.gifAll About Telescopes (Cover) S01.jpg

Mine is hard bound! Read it cover to cover about 10 times :)

 

-drl



#69 Paul Rini

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 10:29 AM

 

I have the 1967 edition.  The example Cass on page 189 is a 6" version.

 

attachicon.gifAll About Telescopes (Cover) S01.jpg

Mine is hard bound! Read it cover to cover about 10 times smile.gif

 

-drl

 

If I'm not mistaken the 6" version is a classical cassegrain with a parabolic primary which needs to have critical spacing between the secondary and the primary mirrors while the DK has a spherical secondary allowing different spacing and different effective focal lengths....so much better since the primary can do the telescopes main focusing. 



#70 randy_1701

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Posted 21 November 2017 - 05:00 PM

Greetings, all,

 

Here I am on an older thread again, but I wanted to reflect (no pun intended) on my old red Edmund 4.25 inch f/10.5 Newtonian reflector from 1980.  I recently recovered it from storage, along with its pier and nearly complete RKE eyepiece and Barlow collection, and I was extremely pleased to find it had weathered the decades in storage and still has clear and sharp optics, after 37 years of existence...

 

It was my pride and joy through the 80s, and although moderate in aperture, it let me discover SO much of the amateur experience in my teenage and early twenty's, and I am so pleased to have it back in action and be able to preserve it for my now toddler son, for "someday."  It showed me the Moon's craggy surface in good detail, brilliant views of Saturn's rings (although they were edge-on back when I first got the scope!), details in the cloud bands of Jupiter, the dance of the Jovian moons, the ice caps and other details on Mars, Venus in crescent glory, and even tantalizing views of Uranus, back in the day.  There were double stars, and the brighter Globular clusters, nebulae in the Summer skies, the rich Milky Way, hints of distant galaxies, and even some spectacular comets and even asteroid occultation's.  The list goes on and on, I am sure those who read this can relate.  It may not have been a large scope, but it packed quite a bit of potential in it's bright red tube and stable and sturdy mount.  Ahhhh memories....

 

Here are a couple recent shots of the scope when I brought it back to Carolina from Georgia, just a couple weeks ago...

 

Clear Skies,

Randy

 

Edmund4.25inchF10_1980Nov182017_2pg.jpg
Edmund4.25inchF10_1980Nov182017_1pg.jpg
Edmund4.25inchF10_1980Nov182017_3pg.jpg
Edmund4.25inchF10_1980Nov182017_4pg.jpg

 


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#71 Joe1950

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Posted 21 November 2017 - 05:46 PM

Really good thread, Paul !

 

Of course I spent a lot of time there also from the mid 60s on, being so close also. I built a 6", f/8 reflector with their mirror and the heavy duty mount and pedestal. To save money I used the spiral paper tubes they sold. They were much thicker than today's sono tubes and had black paper on the outside and inside. Made a nice scope.

 

For a while, when you went into the store they had that massive 8" Newt. on display. Everything about that scope was big and solid. Photos never did it justice as seeing the real thing up close.

 

Did you ever meet Joe Cocozza, Paul? He worked or consulted for Edmunds in the late 70s or 80s, I believe. Very talented guy and wrote the book "Astrophotography Near City Lights."

 

I never met the family, but new Charlotte who ran the store for a long time. 


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#72 akman1955

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Posted 21 November 2017 - 06:06 PM

smile.gif so Preston Smith sold me this and said it was a hard to find mount/Edmund voyagergrin.gif and came with very RARE leg lubricator:) anyone have one of these voyager mounts??

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Edited by akman1955, 21 November 2017 - 06:17 PM.

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#73 randy_1701

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Posted 22 November 2017 - 10:34 AM

Akman1955,

Looks like the same tripod and fork as the one Edmund used in later years with the red 3 inch reflector, just the Voyager cradle is different.  And of course the silver/grey tube Voyager, compared to the red tube varient, mostly seen on the tabletop cast mount.  Cool...

 

Here is the entry for a tabletop mounted Voyager 6001, scanned from a Spring/Summer 1981 Edmund catalog I happily found on my trip to GA to retrieve my 4.25 incher...  I am going to see if I can find a photo of the 3 inch reflector on the tripod and mount you show in your photo.

 

Clear Skies and fond Edmund memories...

Randy

 

 

ES1981SpringCatalogPg2Small.jpg


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#74 Bomber Bob

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Posted 22 November 2017 - 10:58 AM

Randy, your 1980 Edmund 4.25 is a beauty!  I've seen plenty of Palomars & Space Conquerers at star parties, but never any of the red & cream Voyager series.  Looks like it was well worth the drive.


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#75 randy_1701

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Posted 22 November 2017 - 11:42 AM

Bomber Bob,

Thanks, so much.

 

I have to say, when I was a teenager this little red scope was the ULTIMATE Christmas present, and I knew then that it was something special to enjoy, cherish and protect.  As such, when I got a bit older and went off to university I took care to pack it carefully away for long term storage, and even saved the RKE eyepieces and Barlow in my old original tan Orion accessory case, knowing that having a matching set would make it even nicer in the future.  I had no idea how the tides would turn for Edmund Scientific, and quality built instruments, in general, and how things would change in the almost 40 years ensuing.

 

The only mods I had ever done were to add a homebuilt 40mm finderscope, made from my outgrown "first telescope", which was a Kmart/Focal 15-45x40mm spotting scope, some PVC pipe and a spare 25mm Orion Keller in 0.965 inch size, along with a simple 1x4 wooden finderscope mount made with a saber saw to cut the radius.  I was quite crafty, back then...still am!   I attached it to the red phenolic tube using the "camera mount" holes, already there, and used it for years that way, in addition to the standard 5x24mm red finderscope.  I took it off before storing the Edmund scope, way back in 1990.  So, the little gem of a red reflector has been stored away since then, but I would occasionally check on the condition, especially the mirrors, and they always looked just like they did on the Christmas Day I got it in 1980.  Pristine...

 

My wife and I were blessed with a little boy in 2016, (yep, became a first time Dad at 50! - I got a young wife.,..) and my hopes and intentions were to always hand down my equipment to him, if he "breaks the mold" of the current generation, and actually likes hands-on and old-school things, like dear old Dad...*chuckle*  I have high hopes, and we're keeping him balanced between technology and wooden toys and the like.  I am already introducing him to the night sky and stars, constellations, lunar phases, planets, etc. in the hopes he takes a good interest...  SO far so good...  The Edmund red 4.25inch reflector and pier and accessories will become his, someday, and I hope to instill in him the same respect I learned in taking care to preserve things worth saving.

 

Regards, Clear Skies and fond Edmund memories...

Randy


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