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Demystifying Solar Eclipse Photography - 4 Steps For Success - Step 1

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#1 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 08:14 PM

Hello Everyone,

 

I love the fact that the moderators for Cloudy Nights thought of having a dedicated forum for the North American Total Solar Eclipse 2017.  I am going to work hard to try to contribute to this forum.  Eclipses are my passion.

 

I am a private practice plastic surgeon that has always been involved in out-reach education, both in my profession, medicine, and in my hobby astronomy.

 

I have observed 3 previous total solar eclipses, 2 on land and 1 on a cruise.  Since 2001, I've studied in great detail everything Fred Espenak has written about eclipse photography.  After each of my eclipses I would analyze what went right or what went wrong.  For the purposes of teaching, I break down solar eclipse photography into 4 simple steps.  I try to demystify the preparation.

 

For 2017, I am determined to help as many 1st time eclipse observers and photographers to be successful.  In preparation for this eclipse, I have been giving a comprehensive talk about eclipse photography.  I am designated as a NASA Subject Matter Expert on this eclipse.  I have given my talk to the NASA Solar Science Group at the National Space Science Technology Center in Huntsville, Alabama.  I've given it to the Birmingham Astronomical Society in Alabama.  I had the opportunity to coach the team from the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum that is going to Missouri to video stream the eclipse back to the Museum.  In June I am scheduled to give a talk at the US Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville.  I will continue outreach right up to the eclipse.

 

My plan is to add posts to this forum that pulls screen shots of slides from my talk.

The Four Steps are:
1.  Effective Focal Length For Eclipse Photography
2.  Understanding Eclipse Camera Exposure Based On Filtered Full Disk Sun Images
3.  Relating That (Step 2) To The Exposure For Baley's Beads and the Diamond Ring
4.  Bracketing During Totality

 

I will then supplement with posts on proper C2 and C3 photography timing.  Partial phase phenomena sequence imaging.  Tips for video.  Tips for wide angle shots.  Maybe we can also discuss the partial phase phenomena, one of my favorite parts of an eclipse.

 

Today I am posting  Step 1 - Effective Focal Length For Eclipse Photography

 

I have attached 6 slides that are self explanatory.  The bottom line is that you must understand that there is a sweet spot for focal length with solar eclipse photography and that is an effective focal length of 800mm to 1,200mm.  If you are too short you will have to crop in a lot for corona detail.  If you are too long you will cut off the outer filaments of the corona with the longer shutter speeds (Step 4).  Actually, right at 1,000mm is perfect.

 

The 1st 4 slides are an overview of the difference between full frame chip digital SLR cameras and small chip digital SLR cameras and the effect on effective focal length.  You must understand this about your particular setup.  You must practice now, with a solar filter on your gear and determine the Sun disk image size for YOUR setup (slide 6).

 

The 5th and 6th slides are the 1st keys to success.  These slides have one of my totality photographs overlaid on a film image representing some common focal lengths.  So the point is, it does not matter what glass you will use or what camera you will use (crop factor or not), as long as you will be in the sweet spot for your setup (slide 5).

 

Thanks for reading this.  I will work on the Step 2 post.

 

Gordon
www.solareclipsetimer.com

 

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#2 corduroy

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 10:21 PM

Thanks Gordon for posting this information.

 

I am going to use eclipse orchestrator to automate my shots but am debating on what scope to use.  

 

I have a AT72ED which has a focal length of 430mm at f/6 and a C8Edge which has a focal length of 2032mm at F/10. I will be using a crop sensor canon 70D DSLR.   Even with a 0.62x reducer and a crop sensor camera I guess the C8Edge it out for imaging.. maybe a reducer and the Daystar quark would be good for visual only.

 

So I am stuck with the AT72ED at 430mm, effective = 645mm.   With the resolution of the DSLRs now do you think that is not critical to get to the ~1000mm effective focal length sweet spot?   The images could be cropped.

 

 

Thanks



#3 Cajundaddy

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 10:27 PM

I think 500-600mm is the sweet spot so use your AT72.  I will be using a camera lens for photos because both of my scopes are too long in FL.

 

The "action" is the corona, not the frame-filling disc.


Edited by Cajundaddy, 12 May 2017 - 10:30 PM.


#4 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 10:45 PM

corduroy,

 

You can see from the demonstration images that 645mm would not be too bad.  Cameras have so many megapixels now that you can probably crop in some.  I would rather have 645mm and be small, than be to long and cut off the outer filaments of the corona if you can have long shutter speeds.  Especially if you are going to use a clock drive, you will be able to get a lot of outer corona, even if the inner coronas starts to get over exposed.  Question, will that camera on your scope behave the same way as a camera lens at 430mm? Your chip will have a 1.6 crop factor with regular camera lenses.  I don't know, it depends on the image circle at prime focus on your chip.  I would do tests with a solar filter.  I discussed this in another reply.  https://www.cloudyni...-advice-needed/

 

I have no experience with focal reducers for solar eclipses.  I have never read anything about it and I don't know if Fred Espenak has ever done it.  And what he does, is what I try to learn from.  The problem is that there is NO WAY to practice with it in advance.  The dynamic range of the brightness during eclipse photography on any single shot is huge.  Bright beads, diamond ring the inner corona.  You just don't know if any of those extra surfaces of glass are going to cause any internal reflections that are going to cause ghosting.  So it's an unknown.  This happened to me in 2002 when I tried to do eyepiece projection into a Nikon CoolPix camera with my Takahashi FC-60 scope.  The extra glass somewhere caused ghost images during totality.  This was never caused during my practice sessions at home just using the set up on the full filtered Sun.

 

Regarding "the action" as commented by Cajundaddy.  I agree some an disagree some.  Nicely magnified images of the chromosphere and prominences (if there are any) require being to the longer side.  You can actually see the Moon move across and start to cover prominences and chromosphere when you look at your images right at C2 and those right before C3.  So the fast shutter speeds 1/500 to 1/2000, depending on your f-stop, can reveal really beautiful stuff close to the Sun and at good long focal lengths.  You maybe able to get these clearly at around 650mm, I don't know.  It will depend on how good your focus is and how many mega pixels end up in the image.  This will be my 1st eclipse shooting digital SLR's, a Nikon DX and a Nikon FX.  I hope I get it right.  Every eclipse is a challenge!  I have made mistakes at each eclipse

 

Look at my pictures here  https://www.cloudyni...success-step-3/  These are at 1000 mm on ISO 200 slide film, scanned into the computer and then cropped in.

 

Thanks for your comment!

 

Gordon

http://www.eclipsetimer.com


Edited by foxwoodastronomy, 12 May 2017 - 11:00 PM.


#5 The Luckster

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 12:07 AM

Thank you Gordon for your exhaustive and articulate work.

 

I plan on having two rigs setup for my photos; a Canon 6D (20.2mp full frame) with Canon 70-200L coupled to a pair of Kenko Teleplus Pro 300 DG TCs, for a focal length of 560mm.  My other rig will be a Canon EOS M2 (18mp 1.6x crop sensor) with an adapted Canon FD 300mm, coupled to a Canon FD 2X-A TC for a 600mm focal length (960mm effective)....and a couple of Solar filters.

 

Looking forward to this day.

 

J



#6 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 07:42 AM

The Luckster,

 

Thanks for your nice comment

 

I like what you have thought about.  Good work.  I like how you are working on considering your crop factor.

 

I don't know Canon products?  So which would you say is the "better' camera, I am assuming the 6D.  Here are a couple of thoughts, no particular order, just something to think about and I may be assessing your equipment incorrectly and what your goals are.

 

1.  I wish you did not have to have as many surfaces of glass in front of the 6D.  The 70-200 zoom lens plus 2 Kenko 1.4 converters (correct 1.4?).  But I realize you have to use the other camera the way you are to get to 960mm.

 

2.  I like the system you are using to get to 960mm taking advantage of the crop factor.  That is a perfect focal length!

 

3.  If you have a really good setup to get to 960mm, I might say that don't see the advantage of doing another setup to 560mm.  Your 960mm setup is for you corona shots.  What is the 560 going to do for you?   It's a little short.

 

4.  Did you see my other post about framing for planets in the sky.  Venus is going to be beautiful at mag -3.97, but it's going to be 35 degrees to the West.  With the 2 setups you have thought about right now, you don't have anything that you can quickly zoom down to 35 to 50mm to have a wide enough field of view to frame totality and Venus in the same image.  I did some tests the other night when Jupiter was 39 degrees from the Moon, just to get a feeling for Venus being 35 degrees anyway from totality.  With my quick tests, it seems like it would be good to be at about 35mm, but I have to do some more tests.  With Venus being so bright, it will be a nice balance, since you won't have to over expose totality so much to get enough exposure to see the planets like I had to do in 2001 with Jupiter and 2002 with Mercury.  Understand what I mean?  Don't ignore a setup to frame totality and Venus together, we have a great opportunity in 2017.

 

https://www.cloudyni...gle-sky-images/

 

5.  Maybe you want two setups for the corona, one as a back up  That's fine.  You may have other plans for the horizon and Venus, you did not say.  But if you have other plans for those, then we are now saying you are thinking about running 3 or 4 cameras.  That is a lot if this is your first eclipse.

 

You've done good work planning ahead!

 

Those are my thoughts.  Post a reply and let me know what you think.

 

Gordon

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#7 The Luckster

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 01:57 PM

Gordon:

 

My Canon 6D has a superior sensor than my EOS M2 crop, and also superior algorithms and RAW output , also more dynamic range. 

 

Yes, adding 2 teleconverters (1.4x & 2.0x) is a lot of additional glass to my Canon 70-200mmL, but I still get good quality from this 560mm setup...really good.

 

Since my Canon EOS M2 is a mirrorless body, I can easily adapt my old manual focus glass to it.  Though my older FD mount glass has it's challenges with CA and other IQ issues that get magnified when using higher mp bodies.

 

However, I still can easily swap out my Canon bodies with the 70-200mmL/2 teleconverter setup:  focal length for the 6D would be 560mm, and the M2 would have an effective focal length of 896mm, respectively.

 

In my viewing location of Los Angeles, California, we'll be getting about 69% of the eclipse.

 

Regards

 

J



#8 overnight

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 08:48 PM

Thanks for this help.

 

I'm using a Nikon D5000 and SkyWatcher Equinox 80mm f/6.25 (500mm).

 

Here's what it looks like:

Sun through Equinox 80

 

Is this too small? It looks perfect for the corona to me.


Edited by overnight, 13 May 2017 - 08:49 PM.

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#9 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 09:31 PM

overnight,

 

That looks very good to me. I have a D5000 also, so you have a 1.5 crop factor.  Your effective focal length should be right around 750mm.  Hard to tell exactly because we can't be exactly sure what your image circle is at prime focus.

 

But if you compare your image to my 1000mm image, you can see that you are just a little but smaller.  So I think 750mm is where you are working.   I like your set up.

 

Are you going to be on a clock drive or a camera tripod?  That will help you choose your ISO and shutter speeds.  You did not post ISO and shutter speed for your image?  If you are on a clock drive you will be able to take some relatively long shutter speeds and get really far out on the corona, so it is good that you have nice "padding" around you Sun disk

 

You should be just fine!  Now practice your routine for solar filters removal and changes of shutter speed etc.

 

Also, do you have another wide angle set up ready to frame Venus with totality?

 

Gordon

http://www.solareclipsetimer.com/



#10 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 09:37 PM

Gordon:

 

My Canon 6D has a superior sensor than my EOS M2 crop, and also superior algorithms and RAW output , also more dynamic range. 

 

Yes, adding 2 teleconverters (1.4x & 2.0x) is a lot of additional glass to my Canon 70-200mmL, but I still get good quality from this 560mm setup...really good.

 

Since my Canon EOS M2 is a mirrorless body, I can easily adapt my old manual focus glass to it.  Though my older FD mount glass has it's challenges with CA and other IQ issues that get magnified when using higher mp bodies.

 

However, I still can easily swap out my Canon bodies with the 70-200mmL/2 teleconverter setup:  focal length for the 6D would be 560mm, and the M2 would have an effective focal length of 896mm, respectively.

 

In my viewing location of Los Angeles, California, we'll be getting about 69% of the eclipse.

 

Regards

 

J

Luckster,

 

Did I read this correctly, you are staying in LA to get a 69% partial!  Ouch!  Ouch again!  Get to Oregon man!!  Get to the path!

 

You have no idea what you are missing.  The next one is in Chile in 2019.  Next USA one is 2024, path is from Mexico, into Texas and up to Maine.

 

Gordon

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#11 overnight

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 10:09 PM

overnight,

 

That looks very good to me. I have a D5000 also, so you have a 1.5 crop factor.  Your effective focal length should be right around 750mm.  Hard to tell exactly because we can't be exactly sure what your image circle is at prime focus.

 

I only have a field flattener and a T-Ring inbetween the camera sensor and the telescope's focuser. I'm not sure where the image circle is either.

 

But if you compare your image to my 1000mm image, you can see that you are just a little but smaller.  So I think 750mm is where you are working.   I like your set up.

 

OK, good. I was getting worried since my only options were this, a 8" f/5 Newtonian, and a 5" f/5 Newtonian. The 8" is too big for the Sun, and the 5" can't reach focus without a 2x Barlow, where the Sun gets cropped out.

 

Are you going to be on a clock drive or a camera tripod?  That will help you choose your ISO and shutter speeds.  You did not post ISO and shutter speed for your image?  If you are on a clock drive you will be able to take some relatively long shutter speeds and get really far out on the corona, so it is good that you have nice "padding" around you Sun disk

 

I'm going to put the scope on my Advanced VX and align to the Sun. For polar alignment I'm going to "guesstimate lol.gif" using Stellarium.

 

The image is 1/800 sec at ISO 100.

 

You should be just fine!  Now practice your routine for solar filters removal and changes of shutter speed etc.

 

That's what I'm planning to do. My filter is made of Baader AstroSolar film, and it comes off easily with the twist of one ring. When its on its sturdy.

 

Also, do you have another wide angle set up ready to frame Venus with totality?

 

I hadn't considered that until now, but since this is my first total solar eclipse I'm not going to. Its too much work, and I also want to have some time to just look at the eclipse (with appropriate filters of course).

 

Gordon

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I'm also planning to do it by taking 3 exposures per each time from C1 to C2, and C3 to C4 using Solar Eclipse Timer. 2 minutes before totality I'll prepare for the Bailey's beads and the Diamond ring (unsure of what exposure time to use on them though). During totality I'll quickly get the corona by bracketing exposures from whatever I use to do the Diamond ring to 1/2 second. I'll figure out what exact exposures I'll use for the corona during practice. After C3, I'll get back to taking 3 exposure for every single sequence, until its finally over.

 

Anyways, I'm still debating doing this manually versus using something like Eclipse Orchestrator. It seems like a lot could go wrong with it, and doing manual seems safe.

 

I'l also have my 5" f/5 Newt (Baader Solar Filter) with a 14mm UWA set out for visual observing.

 

This all, of course assuming I don't have to dash somewhere else due to the great nemesis known as clouds.


Edited by overnight, 13 May 2017 - 10:25 PM.


#12 Cajundaddy

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 10:09 PM

Gordon:

 

My Canon 6D has a superior sensor than my EOS M2 crop, and also superior algorithms and RAW output , also more dynamic range. 

 

Yes, adding 2 teleconverters (1.4x & 2.0x) is a lot of additional glass to my Canon 70-200mmL, but I still get good quality from this 560mm setup...really good.

 

Since my Canon EOS M2 is a mirrorless body, I can easily adapt my old manual focus glass to it.  Though my older FD mount glass has it's challenges with CA and other IQ issues that get magnified when using higher mp bodies.

 

However, I still can easily swap out my Canon bodies with the 70-200mmL/2 teleconverter setup:  focal length for the 6D would be 560mm, and the M2 would have an effective focal length of 896mm, respectively.

 

In my viewing location of Los Angeles, California, we'll be getting about 69% of the eclipse.

 

Regards

 

J

Get to the full shadow my friend, get to the full shadow if you have an interest in this stuff.  OR/ID/WY  69% is missing this rare total eclipse event completely.


Edited by Cajundaddy, 13 May 2017 - 10:11 PM.

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#13 overnight

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 10:15 PM

 

Gordon:

 

My Canon 6D has a superior sensor than my EOS M2 crop, and also superior algorithms and RAW output , also more dynamic range. 

 

Yes, adding 2 teleconverters (1.4x & 2.0x) is a lot of additional glass to my Canon 70-200mmL, but I still get good quality from this 560mm setup...really good.

 

Since my Canon EOS M2 is a mirrorless body, I can easily adapt my old manual focus glass to it.  Though my older FD mount glass has it's challenges with CA and other IQ issues that get magnified when using higher mp bodies.

 

However, I still can easily swap out my Canon bodies with the 70-200mmL/2 teleconverter setup:  focal length for the 6D would be 560mm, and the M2 would have an effective focal length of 896mm, respectively.

 

In my viewing location of Los Angeles, California, we'll be getting about 69% of the eclipse.

 

Regards

 

J

Get to the full shadow my friend, get to the full shadow if you have an interest in this stuff.  OR/ID/WY  69% is missing this rare total eclipse event completely.

 

Even 99% is missing it completely!


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#14 The Luckster

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 12:24 AM

It's what I have, so I'll make the best of it. 

 

I'm lucky my rotating day-off landed on this day, otherwise I'd be at work...

 

J



#15 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 05:39 AM

overnight,

 

Your plan is looks well thought out.  You will be successful.  The entire thing will be a "thrill ride" and trying to image it successfully is part of the fun.

 

Yes, use the partial phase image sequence calculator in my app for the sequence.  Remember to go to my website and print out a few copies of the PPISC Worksheet.

 

Did you do this yet?  If you know your exact observing location, put the coordinates into Solar Eclipse Timer manually, let it calculate the contact times, load the times into the timers and then let it calculate the partial phase linage sequence times for you. You can write those down now.  Have some extra blank PPISC Worksheets with you for eclipse day, in case you have to pick a different observing position, you can quickly calculate a new sequence based on your new location.

 

Thanks for giving me the ISO and the shutter speed on your image.  I have Baader film now also and I am going to run some exposure tests with it on the full SUN disk image.  I want to see what the light transmission difference  is between Thousand Oaks glass and Baader on my setup.  I then will able to discuss with you a starting point for shutter speeds with your gear.  Your system is "fast", if you have a full Sun disk image properly exposed with Baader, ISO 100, f6.25 and a shutter speed of 1/800. film.

 

Please don't give up on a small 2nd setup for a Venus and totality shot together!  I'm telling you, this is a good opportunity because Venus is so bright, it allows you to expose for totality better!  You don't need much stuff.  Even just a point and shoot camera on a tripod that has manual mode and can give you a focal length of about 35 to 50 mm, will do.  If you have another cheap SLR and a cheap zoom lens, that will do.You don't even need a solar filter for it because you are only going to use it during totality to frame that shot and bracket a few exposes.  Did you read my post on Wide Angle shots?

 

Gordon

http://wwwsolareclipsetimer.com


Edited by foxwoodastronomy, 14 May 2017 - 02:17 PM.


#16 Rickycardo

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 07:52 AM

overnight,

 

Your plan is looks well thought out.  You will be successful.  The entire thing will be a "thrill ride" and trying to image it successfully is part of the fun.

 

Yes, use the partial phase image sequence calculator in my app for the sequence.  Remember to go to my website and print out a few copies of the PPISC Worksheet.

 

Did you do this yet?  If you know your exact observing location, put the coordinates into Solar Eclipse Timer manually, let it calculate the contact times, load the times into the timers and then let it calculate the partial phase linage sequence times for you. You can write those down now.  Have some extra blank PPISC Worksheets with you for eclipse day, in case you have to pick a different observing position, you can quickly calculate a new sequence based on your new location.

 

Thanks for giving me the ISO and the shutter speed on your image.  I have Baader film now also and I am going to run some exposure tests with it on the full SUN disk image.  I want to see what the light transmission difference  is between Thousand Oaks glass and Baader on my setup.  I then will able to discuss with you a starting point for shutter speeds with your gear.  Your system is "fast", if you have a full Sun disk image properly exposed with Baader, ISO 100, f6.25 and a shutter speed of 1/800. film.

 

Please don't give up on a small 2nd setup for a Venus and totality shot together!  I'm telling you, this is a good opportunity because Venus is so bright, it allows you to expose for totality better!  You don't need much stuff.  Even just a point and shoot camera on a tripod that has manual mode and can give you a focal length of about 35 to 500 mm, will do.  If you have another cheap SLR and a cheap zoom lens, that will do.You don't even need a solar filter for it because you are only going to use it during totality to frame that shot and bracket a few exposes.  Did you read my post on Wide Angle shots?

 

Gordon

http://wwwsolareclipsetimer.com

Link not working.



#17 Rickycardo

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 08:01 AM

Ok, I don't know why when I click on your link the page doesn't load but when I searched for it and clicked that link the page loaded fine. It's the same link (I think).

Maybe it's just an ID10T error on my part. confused1.gif



#18 overnight

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 11:12 AM

overnight,

 

Your plan is looks well thought out.  You will be successful.  The entire thing will be a "thrill ride" and trying to image it successfully is part of the fun.

 

Thanks!

 

Yes, use the partial phase image sequence calculator in my app for the sequence.  Remember to go to my website and print out a few copies of the PPISC Worksheet.

 

Did you do this yet?  If you know your exact observing location, put the coordinates into Solar Eclipse Timer manually, let it calculate the contact times, load the times into the timers and then let it calculate the partial phase linage sequence times for you. You can write those down now.  Have some extra blank PPISC Worksheets with you for eclipse day, in case you have to pick a different observing position, you can quickly calculate a new sequence based on your new location.

 

I'll do that for my practice once the weather starts cooperating again...

 

Thanks for giving me the ISO and the shutter speed on your image.  I have Baader film now also and I am going to run some exposure tests with it on the full SUN disk image.  I want to see what the light transmission difference  is between Thousand Oaks glass and Baader on my setup.  I then will able to discuss with you a starting point for shutter speeds with your gear.  Your system is "fast", if you have a full Sun disk image properly exposed with Baader, ISO 100, f6.25 and a shutter speed of 1/800. film.

 

The reason its so fast is because I use it for DSO astrophotography. Isn't fast better since I can get it properly exposed for a shorter time, thus allowing any mount errors to be practically negligible?

 

Please don't give up on a small 2nd setup for a Venus and totality shot together!  I'm telling you, this is a good opportunity because Venus is so bright, it allows you to expose for totality better!  You don't need much stuff.  Even just a point and shoot camera on a tripod that has manual mode and can give you a focal length of about 35 to 500 mm, will do.  If you have another cheap SLR and a cheap zoom lens, that will do.You don't even need a solar filter for it because you are only going to use it during totality to frame that shot and bracket a few exposes.  Did you read my post on Wide Angle shots?

 

I read it. The problem for me is finding another camera. I have the Nikon D5000 attached to the SW 80, a QHY 5L-II-M, a Nikon CoolPix, a Canon video camera, and thats it. I have phones available to me, but those probably can't do anything. Which one would work, and how would I make it work?

 

Gordon

http://wwwsolareclipsetimer.com



#19 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 05:43 PM

overnight,

 

Start to fool around with your CoolPix.  I bet it will be perfect for this shot.  I have 3 of the old style ones that rotated in the middle, models 990, 995 and 4500.  The lens on the 995 was a 35mm equivalent of 32mm to 135mm and I think the 4600 is the same.

 

Figure out what yours is regarding 35 mm equivalent focal length from its specs.  You will probably use it all the way zoomed out.  Put it on the highest quality setting.  Learn how to take it off of auto focus and just focus on infinity.  Learn how to get it in manual mode and change the shutter speeds.  You will have to put it on a tripod but I think if you are careful you will not need a remote shutter release.  I'll bet you can gently hit the shutter with your finger.

 

I did some tests with the Moon and Jupiter the other night when Jupiter was 39 degrees away from the Moon and from that, it looked like we will need about 28mm to 35mm to frame Venus and totality together easily.  Maybe be able to get them at 50mm, I have to do more testing.

 

You have another night with a good opportunity to the test FOV of your gear on the Moon and Jupiter, June 6, 2017.  They will be about 39 degrees apart.  This will give you a good feeling for the angular separation of Totality and Venus on eclipse day.  I have attached The Sky simulation for this at 9 PM CST.  I also attached The Sky simulation for eclipse day with FOV indicators for 50mm and 35 mm effective FOV

 

Gordon

http://www.solareclipsetimer.com

Attached Files


Edited by foxwoodastronomy, 14 May 2017 - 06:37 PM.


#20 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 05:52 PM

Ok, I don't know why when I click on your link the page doesn't load but when I searched for it and clicked that link the page loaded fine. It's the same link (I think).

Maybe it's just an ID10T error on my part. confused1.gif

Sorry, I missed typing the period after the www  - therefore it's my fault.

 

http://www.solareclipsetimer.com



#21 overnight

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Posted 28 May 2017 - 03:35 PM

overnight,

 

Start to fool around with your CoolPix.  I bet it will be perfect for this shot.  I have 3 of the old style ones that rotated in the middle, models 990, 995 and 4500.  The lens on the 995 was a 35mm equivalent of 32mm to 135mm and I think the 4600 is the same.

 

I've been digging around and I've finally found it! Its a S3000. I'll fool around with it.

 

Figure out what yours is regarding 35 mm equivalent focal length from its specs.  You will probably use it all the way zoomed out.  Put it on the highest quality setting.  Learn how to take it off of auto focus and just focus on infinity.  Learn how to get it in manual mode and change the shutter speeds.  You will have to put it on a tripod but I think if you are careful you will not need a remote shutter release.  I'll bet you can gently hit the shutter with your finger.

 

I did some tests with the Moon and Jupiter the other night when Jupiter was 39 degrees away from the Moon and from that, it looked like we will need about 28mm to 35mm to frame Venus and totality together easily.  Maybe be able to get them at 50mm, I have to do more testing.

 

You have another night with a good opportunity to the test FOV of your gear on the Moon and Jupiter, June 6, 2017.  They will be about 39 degrees apart.  This will give you a good feeling for the angular separation of Totality and Venus on eclipse day.  I have attached The Sky simulation for this at 9 PM CST.  I also attached The Sky simulation for eclipse day with FOV indicators for 50mm and 35 mm effective FOV

 

Gordon

http://www.solareclipsetimer.com

 

Thanks!



#22 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 28 May 2017 - 04:38 PM

overnight,

 

Great.  I think you are set up well.

 

Good work!

 

I don't recall if you said you were going to do any video.  I posted my video tips thread yesterday.  You may want to give it a read.

 

https://www.cloudyni...eo-camera-tips/

 

Gordon


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#23 overnight

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Posted 28 May 2017 - 07:45 PM

overnight,

 

Great.  I think you are set up well.

 

Good work!

 

I don't recall if you said you were going to do any video.  I posted my video tips thread yesterday.  You may want to give it a read.

 

https://www.cloudyni...eo-camera-tips/

 

Gordon

My CoolPix can't be turned off autofocus. I can only turn digital zoom off, and set the FOV to the maximum.

 

Its completely automatic and digital, so it isn't that flexible.

 

I'll try to see if it can focus on stars, if it does it should be fine for an eclipse.

 

As for video, it seems much more easier to do since I have a Canon HF R500 that has a high optical zoom. I have some Thousand Oaks film on hand, so I can fashion a filter for it.


Edited by overnight, 28 May 2017 - 07:49 PM.


#24 foxwoodastronomy

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Posted 28 May 2017 - 10:18 PM

overnight,

 

Yes, try stars.

 

And try a 1/2 to a  3/4 Moon.  Those two phases would be better tests of your CoolPix camera than a Full Moon.

 

Gordon



#25 unknown1304

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 09:28 PM

Hi Gordon,

 

I saw the videos that were done by Destin with the "Smarter Every Day" youtube channel and It has helped me greatly with getting ready for the eclipse.  

 

I was wondering if I could get some input on my setup.

 

To start, the mount I will be using is a Celestron cg5 equatorial mount. It is goto and should track pretty well with a close Polar alignment.  The main scope I will be using is a 10" Newtonian 1200mm FL, F/4.7.  I will be renting a Nikon D600 because it is a full frame sensor and there will not be any crop factor like my D5100s would have.  My concern is that the D600 can use ISO LO (equivalent to 50) with a max shutter speed of 1/4000 sec,  is this going to work to capture Bailey's beads?

 

The second and third cameras I will be using are two Nikon D5100s (one is IR modified) piggybacked with a 50-500 zoom lens and a 80-200 zoom lens.  Which lens would you have the modified camera on or would it not matter?

 

I will be using Eclipse Orchestrator for the D600 with USB and Shoestring DSUSB cables (D5100s are not compatible with EO) and release cables for the D5100s.

 

I am building filters for the lenses out of Solar film and PVC pipe.  For the scope I have a full aperture, glass filter.

 

The memory cards I have are SanDisk Ultra PLUS 64GB.  They are microSDXC UHS-I cards with SD adapters.  The speed says 100mb/sec read.  Do you think that this will be fast enough?  

 

Can you think of any think else I am missing or should change?

 

Thanks for all of you input.

Erik




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