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Meade Schmidt-Newts....for visual

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#1 rob cos.

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Posted 26 March 2004 - 09:18 AM

Can anyone attest to the quality of these? I was going to get the MN56, but I just can't afford it right now....Reality is a b*tch....the price of the mount/OTA combo is hard to beat on the Meade...I read the review in the lab reports so i'm encouraged..but I'd like to hear other opinions...or suggestions? Any help would be appreciated!

#2 matt

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Posted 26 March 2004 - 10:34 AM

- overall build and ergonomics: tie. The intes is built like the proverbial tank (only the Russians know a few things about tanks!), has a nice crayford focuser, but the focus travel is awfully long (the MEade's focus travel just rates as too long), and the finder is awkwardly placed (not to mention awkward to look through). On the downside for the Meade, its secondary is a **** to collimate.

The focus travel becomes a drag with planetary observing, because as both scopes have a short FL yo uwill be resorting to barlows a lot, and at the end your eyepiece is a foot away from the OTA...

- handling: Meade, it's about 6 lbs lighter.

- deep sky performance : tie, both scopes offer bright, wide and flat fields. A pleasure for open cluster and large nebulae viewers.

- planetary viewing: Intes by a significant margin. The MN 66 is an excellent planetary scope, the Meade is decent, not bad but not great. On Jupiter or Saturn it tends to max out at 250x, on the Intes the seeing is the limit.

So: if you like planetary views, take the MN66, but if you look at planets just once in a while take the Meade.

#3 erik

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Posted 26 March 2004 - 11:09 AM

i had an 8 inch meade lxd55 and i sold the ota. i wasn't impressed with it at all, and even less impressed with the tripod legs. i didn't even find the deep sky views to be that great in mine, and the planets were washed out looking with vague details, compared to my 8" newt. maybe it was a lemon. i've looked through a couple more lxd55's since then, and i still wouldn't buy another one. but i guess some people really like the ota's, so it's just my opinion.

#4 rob cos.

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Posted 26 March 2004 - 11:19 AM

Erik, someone else just suggested the 8" Orion Newt on another forum. I think that's the way i'm going-i'll probably grab the ota and use it with the Unistar Deluxe or get it with the Skyview Pro mount.

I would have loved to get the Intes Mak-Newt..but with the wife wanting to go to Italy...we need all the money we can get!

Plus, I've had the LXD55 mount before so I'm really not dying to go back to it again anyway-it was just the price that tempted me.

Thanks for chiming in guys.

#5 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 26 March 2004 - 11:32 AM

Can you buy the Orion 8" newt as an OTA only? I was looking on their website and couldn't find it.

Thanks,

Mattt

#6 rob cos.

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Posted 26 March 2004 - 11:47 AM

Yep, sure can. It's there...on the last page of the reflectors....I can't decide if I want it on the Eq mount w/ the Skyview package or as an OTA with the Unistar Alt-Az.

#7 gazerjim

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Posted 28 March 2004 - 10:36 PM

IMHO, the classic newt., if optically decent, still offers the most seeing for the dollar. Don't expect it (or most other scopes) to come up to speed if diff. between mirror temp. and air temp. is > 3-4 degrees. This seems esp. true of newtonians. Deep sky visual is fairly forgiving of less than excellent optics; lunar/planetary less so.

Good luck,
Jim


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