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Other relatively bright supernovae

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#1 StanH

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 05:10 PM

Besides SN 2017eaw in NGC 6946 there are currently a few other supernovae visible from northern areas in telescopes of 17.5-inch or possibly less.

SN 2017egm in NGC 3191 is superluminous (SNSL-I) or hypernova in NGC 3191 in Ursa Major.  I viewed it last night (June 18) and estimated it around magnitude 14.5.  At a glance the supernova/galaxy combination appeared as a fuzzy, but odd looking star.  With averted vision the supernova stood out east of center.  See http://www.astronome...org/?read=10498 for more information.

 

SN 2017ein in NGC 3938 is a peculiar Type Ic as it only reached around magnitude 15.1.  It is currently fading though.  It lies in Ursa Major.

 

SN 2017erp which is a normal Type Ia in NGC 5861 in Libra. It’s a bit south, but sufficiently high from my latitude of 37 degrees north.  It was an easy starhop from Beta Librae.  On the night of June 18 I estimated it to be around 14.3-14.4 (though an image I took later had it closer to 14.7V). It is currently on the rise and may reach magnitude 13.2.  Also viewed the galaxies NGC 5858, IC 1091, and NGC 5872 in the area. Of these, NGC 5861 was by far the largest.

 

MASTER OT J132501.00+431846.1 was initially thought to be a supernova near NGC 5145, but its quick fading is more indicative of a dwarf nova in our galaxy. It was about magnitude 14.5 a few nights ago, but may be too faint now to be detected in anything but large apertures.  Thus far there has not been a spectrum to my knowledge to determine its nature.

 


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#2 ssmith

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 09:49 PM

"MASTER OT J132501.00+431846.1 was initially thought to be a supernova near NGC 5145, but its quick fading is more indicative of a dwarf nova in our galaxy. It was about magnitude 14.5 a few nights ago, but may be too faint now to be detected in anything but large apertures. Thus far there has not been a spectrum to my knowledge to determine its nature."

Stan - This is good to know. I went out on the 16th to photograph it but caught only a wiff of it on my photos. Seemed way too dim to be at the reported 14.5 mag so I thought there may have been a problem with my equipment. Tried again last night and could not even duplicate my previous feeble success. Totally vanished.

Here is a photo I took of SN2017ein on the same evening.

image.jpeg

Edited by ssmith, 19 June 2017 - 11:32 PM.

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#3 stargzr66207

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 06:33 PM

Stan,

Supernova 2017eaw in NGC-6946 is definitely the cream of the current crop.  I took a look at 2017ein in NGC-3938 last night through my 14-inch f/4.5 Steve Swayze Dob under mag 21.4 skies (SQM-L reading).  It was a tough one, but with averted vision it could be held, close to the nucleus on the SE side. The galaxy itself looked great, with hints of two spiral arms, and a lot of mottling in the outer haze. I was observing at 80X (20mm Nagler II).

 

Ron Abbott


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#4 StanH

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 06:37 PM

Steve - the latest on David Bishop's page has it at 17.6 on June 18.

 

Forgot in my original post to include David's link for those who might not be aware of it:  http://www.rochester...y.org/snimages/

 

He does extraordinary work keeping information on supernovae together. 

 

The ASAS-SN team found one which could get to about magnitude 15.0 if it is a Type Ia before maximum.  It is AT 2017evn (ASASSN-17hz) in an SDSS galaxy.  This appears to be a relatively near dwarf galaxy with z = 0.017  https://wis-tns.weiz.../object/2017evn


Edited by StanH, 20 June 2017 - 06:41 PM.


#5 ssmith

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 07:27 AM

Here is a photo of SN2017eaw I took on the same night as SN2017ein above.


image.jpg
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#6 stargzr66207

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 01:12 PM

Here is an image of supernova 2017ein in NGC-3938 which I captured Monday evening the 19th.  Simultaneously, it was just barely visible in my 14-inch f/4.5 dob with averted vision.  It was VERY close to the core.

This image is 48 minutes of data (8X6-minute subs) thru my C-11 at f/2 using HyperStar.NGC3938SN360SecLtAnn.jpg

 

Ron Abbott


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#7 StanH

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 11:50 PM

Tonight I had plans for imaging and observing as I have the next two days off.  Thought I might get lucky and the cirrus runoff from thunderstorms to the west and the apparently leading edge of the tropical system would stay away long enough tonight.  Turned out to be a huge sucker hole. frown.gif

 

However, I did get a view of SN 2017erp in NGC 5861 in Libra.  Poor seeing and stars were more difficult than a few nights ago.  However, it seemed to be as bright as a 13.7 star to the east-southeast.  Wasn't able to image it as from where the imaging telescope was set up a tree was in the way.

 

Got a series on SN 2017ein in NGC 3938 through the thinner portion of the cirrus runoff before they got too thick.  It has faded to around 16.0V now.

SN2017ein NGC3938 June 21 2017

Edited by StanH, 21 June 2017 - 11:56 PM.

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#8 StanH

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 07:17 PM

SN 2017evn (ASASSN-17hz) was confirmed as a Type Ia some 7 days prior to maximum http://www.astronome...org/?read=10521.  There is about 0.1 magnitude of extinction in the direction so it could peak around magnitude 15.1.  Have not seen any updates on David Bishop's site nor have I been able to image it.

 

SN 2017exo (ASASSN-17ie) in IRAS  18294+1636 has also been confirmed as a Type Ia before maximum.  It has a similar redshift to that of SN 2017evn, but there is about 0.9 magnitude of extinction.  It would peak around 15.9.  I was able to image it tonight with a robotic telescope in Spain.  It measured 16.2.  The date on the image should read 2017 June 24.982.  Got a couple of numbers turned around.

SN2017exo

Edited by StanH, 24 June 2017 - 07:27 PM.


#9 Redbetter

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Posted Yesterday, 07:17 AM

I observed SN 2017erp in NGC 5861 in Libra tonight.  This one was easy in the 20" in dark skies even before twilight was complete.  It was more luminous than I anticipated and likely in the 14.0 mag range or better. 

 

Since I was in the region I viewed another 6 NGC galaxies, an IC, and another four MGC/UGC/PGC's.   



#10 SNH

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Posted Yesterday, 03:01 PM

Wow! Thanks a lot StanH for the supernova update. Most of the time David Bishop's sight has a couple ~+14.5 supernovas listed, but when I research them they're in the early morning sky, or too low, or in a galaxy that is so obscure I have trouble finding it! Because of your post though, I got out last night with my 10-inch SCT and saw three supernovas! I first saw SN 2017egm while it was only 31 degrees up in the NW, then saw SN 2017erp around 13th magnitude (I didn't have an AAVSO chart) and 38 degrees up, and finished my observations of supernova off with SN 2017eaw in Cepheus. I'm not familiar with the term "superluminous", so I will have to research that. You might be surprised that I could see all three, but I've seen magnitude +15.3 stars under my magnitude +7.1 skies!

 

Scott




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