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Any advantages shooting astrophotgraphy with film over digital?

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104 replies to this topic

#101 Ron359

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 01:15 PM

All I can say is, show me the pictures.  We need comparisons of the same subject photographed with the same lens on film and with a digital sensor.

just came across this thread.  you might want to read this (now old) series of articles and comparisons by Roger Clark:

 

http://www.clarkvisi...dex.html#part_7


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#102 Michael Covington

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 01:47 PM

just came across this thread.  you might want to read this (now old) series of articles and comparisons by Roger Clark:

 

http://www.clarkvisi...dex.html#part_7

Yes -- a good analysis -- but digital sensors have gotten a lot better since then.



#103 Ron359

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 02:07 PM

Yes -- a good analysis -- but digital sensors have gotten a lot better since then.

yes, i did say they're 'old' now.  But Roger has tons of testing, articles, and images on newer and new Canon cams and lenses.    They've only gotten better, while film has stayed relatively 'the same' (but far less available esp. for astro) if you want to make comparisons.  


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#104 khingdheano

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 11:33 PM

Could not be a better depiction of the "Diamond Ring" effect. I'm speechless.

 

 

Hello, everyone,

 

I am no longer into film astrophotography having boxed up my Honeywell Pentax Spotmatic many years ago but I raised an interesting subject over in the DSLR group and someone suggested I post it here.

 

Has anyone ever compared the mechanics of a 35mm film camera lens iris and shutter design to those of a DSLR? Until a few days ago I never considered this until I began comparing some photos I took of the 1970 total eclipse in Virginia where I captured a striking image of the diamond ring effect to what DSLR cameras being used today have tried to do.

 

Looking at everyone's eclipse photos I just realized how bland and flattened the diamond ring affect appears when photographed with modern DSLR cameras. I was so excited in planning to venture 400 miles south to shoot the August 21st eclipse with a whole array of high tech equipment that I rented but last minute problems caused my plans to unravel and I had to stay home. I was very fortunate to witness the 1970 total eclipse in Virginia and photograph it with my trusted Spotmatic 35mm camera with roll film, although with only a 200mm prime telephoto lens. And the striking appearance of the diamond ring effect that I captured must have been because of the design of the shutter and iris in the camera which modern cameras don't have.

 

I am far from being an expert on the subject but I would be interested in reading some comments.

 

Regards,

Nelson



#105 Michael Covington

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 11:17 AM

The shutter and iris are very little changed since the 1970s.   The diamond ring effect is probably more spectacular on film for the same reason that film does a better job of making the bright stars bigger in a star field -- lateral scattering of light within the film.




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