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Doom and Gloom Predictions of the People-ocalypse during the eclipse

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#51 ed_turco

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 01:07 PM

 

For those who live in Central Oregon near Madras, I'd like to hear some thoughts.

My wife and I have located some BLM land not very far from the Madras Airport. In fact, according to Google Earth, it's about a couple miles. 

My wife (and I, to a lesser degree) have an understandable fear of being bitten by rattlesnakes. One 'Doom and Gloom' article I read (through a link here on CN) was that all the hospitals in the Central Oregon area have significantly upped their supply of rattlesnake antivenom.

We're tent camping with a rather elaborate telescope setup, as I'm shooting for the Eclipse Megamovie project.

What would be our odds be, of actually having being bitten? I wouldn't suspect it would be that much, however I'd like to ease my wife's concerns and fears, as she has expressed some strong hesitation of coming down for the eclipse as a whole. 

The majority of rattlesnake bites that ER's see involve alcohol, ie, people doing bad things, not the snakes.  I've run into dozens of rattlers, and they all just want to be left alone.  On wide open BLM land, with scrub brush, you are not likely to run into rattlesnakes that can't retreat, or come across them by surprise.  When I see them, it's walking in sandy washes where they have been hunting lizards, and they will retreat more often than not, the dangerous situations come about hiking in narrow gullies without good sightlines, and turning corners or climbing up or down ridges with overhangs and surprising them.  

 

If you have a camping spot picked out, flat and open, any snakes will see you and avoid your camp.  I wear high top boots just to give me a few couple extra inches of protection.  Just keep your eyes open and looking out for them, and you'll be OK.  One thing to remember though, is that at the height of summer, they are likely to be out at night, so given how dark it will be, if you are walking away from your immediate camping area, use a good light on your path, if you are trying to preserve your night vision, keep nocturnal strolls close to your camp.  And of course, all the standard advice, don't put your hands or feet anywhere you can't see, move logs and rocks with a shovel or similar tool if they are big enough to hide anything venomous, etc.  

 

 

Anecdotal, but one ER nurse said they she'd only seen 1 rattlesnake bite that didn't involve alcohol, and that person later admitting they had been drinking.  

 

(er, I don't live in central oregon, but I know rattlers)

 

All you have to remember is that these snakes have rattles for a good reason -- to warn off potential trouble.   After all, if those snakes were being ornery and hunting humans for a big happy meal, they'd turn off the switch for those rattles and do silent running.

 

So you have to LOOK and LISTEN.


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#52 RutileQ

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 03:28 PM

There's an idea, maybe more of an urban legend, that because there are so many people out there that just kill any rattler they see, or rather that they see after hearing them, that we are selectively breeding for rattlers that aren't so quick to rattle and warn.  I dunno if that's true, but I've definitely run into quite a few that haven't rattled.  (even worse though, is when they rattle at you suddenly and you have NO idea where they are!!!).



#53 DLuders

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 04:22 PM

To the Original Poster, much of the advance warnings may be valid.  My local newspaper had an article http://www.spokesman...ight-not-seen-/  that said that the John Day, Oregon area will have "up to 60,000 visitors are expected in a valley that has 8,000 residents."  Given that Spokane, WA will only have a ~90.5%  Partial Eclipse and it's only a 5-hour drive south to John Day, it's entirely possible that Grant County, Oregon will be jammed with folks from Eastern Washington.  I have a cousin who's seen 5 Total Solar Eclipses, and he has seen big crowds in rural areas before.  I'll be in Long Creek, OR (north of John Day) and will bring my own food and fuel.  My 5-hour drive on Sunday (the day before the eclipse) could be 8 hours back out on Monday afternoon.


Edited by DLuders, 27 July 2017 - 04:22 PM.


#54 Cotts

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 06:49 PM

Random thoughts:

 

1.  the American Media Hype Machine ™ hasn't really got hold of this yet... In the next 3 weeks we will be bombarded with information and mis-information..... many astronomically unaware people may try to make a last-minute dash for totality...

 

2. If you have a place already booked in totality, AND the weather is good where you are you'll probably be ok.  Fingers crossed!!!!!

 

3.  I was at a Star Party last week (Starfest) and I heard people saying they 'think' they'll drive into such and such city early the morning of the eclipse, find a spot, set up, view the eclipse and then leave.   These were Astronomy-aware people!! This late in the game!!!   If you have no plan by now, fuggeddaboudit!  Stay home and watch it on TV.  I suspect some towns will put up barricades when the town is "full" - local authorities may not be prepared everywhere for the onslaught on eclipse day..

 

4.  If your 'plan' is to grab a motel 4 hours or so away from totality, getting up at 4 or 5 am and driving into  <town>, <state>, driving to a site you saw on Google Earth, setting up and then viewing the eclipse, well, I suspect there will be much disappointment for many who try this - depends on the town....and how many people have their eye on the same spot that you do....

 

5.  Good luck setting up on the side of State Highways or Interstates.... not gonna happen, I suspect.  I'll wager every Walmart Parking lot in totality will be jammed a couple of days before the 21st...  School will be back in session in many states so their property will be off-limits...

 

 

6.  If you have a place already booked in totality and the weather forces you into a 6-am dash to a place 150 miles away where it is supposed to be clear - well, picture this:  have you ever been driving by when a major college or NFL football game has just ended?  Picture an NFL stadium full of people every 50 miles along the totality path, all emptying out at once and EVERYONE driving east (or west) to the predicted clear area where there will already be tons of people......   I think this is where some folks will miss the eclipse and some won't, based on the luck of the weather on the 21st.... 

 

I have a site, in totality, from 3 days before totality in Wyoming with 21 of my club-mates and #6 is what we are mostly worried about....

 

Good luck everyone!!!!!

 

Dave


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#55 ad701xx

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 07:05 PM

For those who live in Central Oregon near Madras, I'd like to hear some thoughts.

My wife and I have located some BLM land not very far from the Madras Airport. In fact, according to Google Earth, it's about a couple miles. 

My wife (and I, to a lesser degree) have an understandable fear of being bitten by rattlesnakes. One 'Doom and Gloom' article I read (through a link here on CN) was that all the hospitals in the Central Oregon area have significantly upped their supply of rattlesnake antivenom.

We're tent camping with a rather elaborate telescope setup, as I'm shooting for the Eclipse Megamovie project.

What would be our odds be, of actually having being bitten? I wouldn't suspect it would be that much, however I'd like to ease my wife's concerns and fears, as she has expressed some strong hesitation of coming down for the eclipse as a whole. 

Steve,

 

I recommend you take a scouting trip down to Madras if possible to check out the area you are planning to view from. Google Earth is a good tool but nothing beats boots on the ground. At the very least, make sure you choose the "automatically tilt and change to ground level view" option and go to ground level to get an idea of what the terrain will be like. I think I know the BLM land you are thinking of and that wouldn't be my first choice of locations.

 

The Crooked River National Grasslands look good from Google Earth also but the "roads" are pretty well rutted but shouldn't be a problem if you have some decent ground clearance. I don't think your average sedan would fare too well out there.

 

Also, a warning to everyone who plans to go off the beaten path...remember your catalytic converter will be extremely hot so please be careful where you park. I'm more worried about fires than rattlesnakes.

 

Dave


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#56 James Ball

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 07:57 PM

Luckily or unluckily I live just north of Hopkinsville, Ky.  According to the map I get 2 minutes 20 seconds of totality, just short of the max which I believe is just south of me.

 

I am hearing that several farmers here have skipped putting out crops and have rented out the ground for observers.  I also heard that the Hopkinsville Community College has rented out all of their parking spaces at $30 each!  They even build three new hotels there just for the eclipse and one they are still finishing the interior and hoping they will be ready by eclipse time, and the cheapest is going at $375 per night.  A lot of people in know from out of the area are predicting cars parked everywhere here on the rural roads, but the locals hardly even know the eclipse is going to happen.  They are going to wake up on that morning and think they have been invaded :)

 

I already have the day off, made sure to put in for it way in advance.  The HR girl at work told me that they are planning to have someone come cook burgers and have ice cream and hand out eclipse glasses for everyone, but it is located just outside the totality path.  I told her I wouldn't be there, been waiting 50 years for this and wasn't going to miss totality just to be at work.  She said "but you won't get a Tee Shirt".  lol.gif   Hmmm Tee Shirt or Totality?  Totality waytogo.gif (and I only have to walk out the door).


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#57 DLuders

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 08:03 PM

@ James Ball:  I bet you could host some people (via AirBnB https://www.airbnb.c...llow_override[]= ) and raise some money to buy the telescope of your dreams!  There's some serious money to be made, courtesy of the sun!  drool.gif  


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#58 James Ball

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 08:16 PM

@ James Ball:  I bet you could host some people (via AirBnB https://www.airbnb.c...llow_override[]= ) and raise some money to buy the telescope of your dreams!  There's some serious money to be made, courtesy of the sun!  drool.gif  

I would have to move out :)  Not much room to rent in a 1 bedroom log cabin.  But if someone wants to pull in the driveway and watch, they are most welcome!

 

I believe a few from work are taking a long lunch that day and are stopping by for some hot dogs or burgers, or fish if I can get Dad to bring some down for a fry!



#59 Bowmoreman

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 09:43 PM

Random thoughts:

 

1.  the American Media Hype Machine ™ hasn't really got hold of this yet... In the next 3 weeks we will be bombarded with information and mis-information..... many astronomically unaware people may try to make a last-minute dash for totality...

 

2. If you have a place already booked in totality, AND the weather is good where you are you'll probably be ok.  Fingers crossed!!!!!

 

3.  I was at a Star Party last week (Starfest) and I heard people saying they 'think' they'll drive into such and such city early the morning of the eclipse, find a spot, set up, view the eclipse and then leave.   These were Astronomy-aware people!! This late in the game!!!   If you have no plan by now, fuggeddaboudit!  Stay home and watch it on TV.  I suspect some towns will put up barricades when the town is "full" - local authorities may not be prepared everywhere for the onslaught on eclipse day..

 

4.  If your 'plan' is to grab a motel 4 hours or so away from totality, getting up at 4 or 5 am and driving into  <town>, <state>, driving to a site you saw on Google Earth, setting up and then viewing the eclipse, well, I suspect there will be much disappointment for many who try this - depends on the town....and how many people have their eye on the same spot that you do....

 

5.  Good luck setting up on the side of State Highways or Interstates.... not gonna happen, I suspect.  I'll wager every Walmart Parking lot in totality will be jammed a couple of days before the 21st...  School will be back in session in many states so their property will be off-limits...

 

 

6.  If you have a place already booked in totality and the weather forces you into a 6-am dash to a place 150 miles away where it is supposed to be clear - well, picture this:  have you ever been driving by when a major college or NFL football game has just ended?  Picture an NFL stadium full of people every 50 miles along the totality path, all emptying out at once and EVERYONE driving east (or west) to the predicted clear area where there will already be tons of people......   I think this is where some folks will miss the eclipse and some won't, based on the luck of the weather on the 21st.... 

 

I have a site, in totality, from 3 days before totality in Wyoming with 21 of my club-mates and #6 is what we are mostly worried about....

 

Good luck everyone!!!!!

 

Dave

Yep #6 is my only worry; already got #2 locked and loaded. I picked eastern TN; lots (LOTS) of backroads to avoid all the out of staters (yeah, I'm one)... that don't know where they are going unless their GPS or map that only shows the Interstates tells them...

Hint: DeLorme maps are your friend (for #6)

At the end of the day, it's God's will; and I'm ok with that. I've got free will, and WILL exercise it... worst case: we get dark in the middle of the day <shudder>


 



#60 jrbarnett

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 10:06 PM

I live in central Oregon and under the path and keep hearing and reading predictions of all sorts of horrible stuff due to the influx of people. One of my friends, who is an astronomer and lives only

15 or so miles outside the path, and could come to my place, is staying home due to those rumors. Seems incredible to me.

 

Sampling of various rumors I have heard, either verbally or in print:

 

1) Highways will be parking lots

2) Gas Stations will run out of gas

3) Snake bites will be common and not enough anti-venom in stock

4) Measles epidemic due to influx of people

5) Restaurants packed to the gills and will run out of food.

6) Grocery stores will run out of food.

7) Many break-ins just outside the totality zone.

8) Emergency services unavailable due to saturation.

9) Internet service will go down.

 

10) Dogs and Cats living together  - https://youtu.be/JmzuRXLzqKk

 

Personally, I think most of the rumors are BS hysteria, mostly from the usual suspects (click bait web posts and government agencies looking for additional funding). Some will probably happen, especially the emergency

services and small establishments in isolated spots (think Mitchell Oregon, for example). IMHO, most are probably BS, especially once you get more than an hour's normal drive outside the zone.

It will be interesting and since I can stay home it is unlikely to affect me.....

 

What do you all think?

Suspend your disbelief.

 

There are 39 million Californians.  Approximately 6 million of them are planning on traveling to see the eclipse.  Of that 6 million approximately 4.5 million are headed to Oregon.  Of the 4.5 million headed to Oregon, half will stay in the I-5 corridor.  The other half, 2.25 million, will be DRIVING to Eastern Oregon.

 

Eastern Oregon has a low population.  Eastern Oregon's infrastructure (mostly 2-lane roads) is designed to handle the traffic generated by a small population.

 

The centerline path in Eastern Oregon is a small percentage of the tota area of Eastern Oregon.  2.25 million Californians in ~1 million vehicles will all arrive in the same narrow corridor at the same time, and will all be driving on your 2-lane roads.

 

You couldn't pay me to visit Oregon for the eclipse.  I have no doubt that it will be dreadful for a few days.

 

Good luck!

 

Jim


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#61 Bowmoreman

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 10:27 PM

 

I live in central Oregon and under the path and keep hearing and reading predictions of all sorts of horrible stuff due to the influx of people. One of my friends, who is an astronomer and lives only

15 or so miles outside the path, and could come to my place, is staying home due to those rumors. Seems incredible to me.

 

Sampling of various rumors I have heard, either verbally or in print:

 

1) Highways will be parking lots

2) Gas Stations will run out of gas

3) Snake bites will be common and not enough anti-venom in stock

4) Measles epidemic due to influx of people

5) Restaurants packed to the gills and will run out of food.

6) Grocery stores will run out of food.

7) Many break-ins just outside the totality zone.

8) Emergency services unavailable due to saturation.

9) Internet service will go down.

 

10) Dogs and Cats living together  - https://youtu.be/JmzuRXLzqKk

 

Personally, I think most of the rumors are BS hysteria, mostly from the usual suspects (click bait web posts and government agencies looking for additional funding). Some will probably happen, especially the emergency

services and small establishments in isolated spots (think Mitchell Oregon, for example). IMHO, most are probably BS, especially once you get more than an hour's normal drive outside the zone.

It will be interesting and since I can stay home it is unlikely to affect me.....

 

What do you all think?

Suspend your disbelief.

 

There are 39 million Californians.  Approximately 6 million of them are planning on traveling to see the eclipse.  Of that 6 million approximately 4.5 million are headed to Oregon.  Of the 4.5 million headed to Oregon, half will stay in the I-5 corridor.  The other half, 2.25 million, will be DRIVING to Eastern Oregon.

 

Eastern Oregon has a low population.  Eastern Oregon's infrastructure (mostly 2-lane roads) is designed to handle the traffic generated by a small population.

 

The centerline path in Eastern Oregon is a small percentage of the tota area of Eastern Oregon.  2.25 million Californians in ~1 million vehicles will all arrive in the same narrow corridor at the same time, and will all be driving on your 2-lane roads.

 

You couldn't pay me to visit Oregon for the eclipse.  I have no doubt that it will be dreadful for a few days.

 

Good luck!

 

Jim

 

LOL

You couldn't pay me to live in California (anywhere, ever)... BTDT... Left from living (ha!) there in 1980 and plan to never be back... <grin>

Just too many of all y'all... and, in one place... ;)  And, despite everything, the numbers are increasing? (how's THAT happening?)

(tongue firmly - sorta? - in cheek)

Truthfully, there is virtually nothing that could get more than 1 million Californians to do the same thing simultaneously, let alone driving OUT of California all at the same time..  too much self-absorbed introspection available whilst still IN California, after all... ;)

I will take my chances here in the east.



#62 SteveRosenow

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 10:30 PM

 

For those who live in Central Oregon near Madras, I'd like to hear some thoughts.

My wife and I have located some BLM land not very far from the Madras Airport. In fact, according to Google Earth, it's about a couple miles. 

My wife (and I, to a lesser degree) have an understandable fear of being bitten by rattlesnakes. One 'Doom and Gloom' article I read (through a link here on CN) was that all the hospitals in the Central Oregon area have significantly upped their supply of rattlesnake antivenom.

We're tent camping with a rather elaborate telescope setup, as I'm shooting for the Eclipse Megamovie project.

What would be our odds be, of actually having being bitten? I wouldn't suspect it would be that much, however I'd like to ease my wife's concerns and fears, as she has expressed some strong hesitation of coming down for the eclipse as a whole. 

Steve,

 

I recommend you take a scouting trip down to Madras if possible to check out the area you are planning to view from. Google Earth is a good tool but nothing beats boots on the ground. At the very least, make sure you choose the "automatically tilt and change to ground level view" option and go to ground level to get an idea of what the terrain will be like. I think I know the BLM land you are thinking of and that wouldn't be my first choice of locations.

 

The Crooked River National Grasslands look good from Google Earth also but the "roads" are pretty well rutted but shouldn't be a problem if you have some decent ground clearance. I don't think your average sedan would fare too well out there.

 

Also, a warning to everyone who plans to go off the beaten path...remember your catalytic converter will be extremely hot so please be careful where you park. I'm more worried about fires than rattlesnakes.

 

Dave

 

My wife and I have a Ford Explorer with larger tires.

Unfortunately, I won't be able to scout out a spot until just before the eclipse - like literally the Saturday before.

What was supposed to've been a scouting trip this weekend ended up being "Spend $450 to replace a broken Nikon D5500" (which broke two weeks ago) so I'm pretty broke at the moment. Unfortunately, I only have one paycheck left to go before the eclipse, and with last minute prep the funds are tight.


As far as the BLM land goes, it's west of the airport near the end of Elbe Drive. The terrain is fine there, and affords a fantastic view of Mt. Jefferson darken before the eclipse happens in Madras.
 



#63 bunyon

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 06:42 AM

Bowmoreman, the little roads in eastern TN are very narrow, twisty and mountainous. You won't go anywhere fast. And the idea of ragging on California for having too many people in one place while living in the eastern USA is odd. CA is worse than the other western states and LA has bad traffic but, overall, it's much less people dense than the east.

We're all spitballing but while OR will be very crowded my guess is it won't be as bad as SC, NC, TN and KY if it's clear in those states. Which it probably won't be. All of which is why I won't be here.
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#64 RutileQ

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 07:06 AM

Well, Bowmoreman is probably right about one thing, most Californians, especially those used to dealing with traffic, are probably too smart to be "driving OUT of California all at the same time.."  I'd guess that a lot of Californians going for the eclipse will be heading up on Saturday, and a fairly large % of them will be camping either with reservations or on public lands, and hopefully, will be more aware of fire dangers than most.   Driving back "into" California is another thing, but hopefully since it will be from smaller roads onto major roads, traffic will move somewhat smoothly after the eclipse is over.  


Edited by RutileQ, 28 July 2017 - 07:08 AM.


#65 Phillip Creed

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 08:08 AM

I don't think any of the eastern states will be anywhere near

 

Bowmoreman, the little roads in eastern TN are very narrow, twisty and mountainous. You won't go anywhere fast. And the idea of ragging on California for having too many people in one place while living in the eastern USA is odd. CA is worse than the other western states and LA has bad traffic but, overall, it's much less people dense than the east.

We're all spitballing but while OR will be very crowded my guess is it won't be as bad as SC, NC, TN and KY if it's clear in those states. Which it probably won't be. All of which is why I won't be here.

I don't think any of the eastern states will be as bad as Oregon, even SC.  South Carolina is the closest totality state to the big East Coast cities, but it also has a large network of roads that could act as primary, secondary and tertiary roads for those committed to seeing totality.  The one exception to that will be US-17, which is the only road of consequence immediately along the coast.  The stretch between Mt. Pleasant and Georgetown is going to be one hot mess on August 21.  Literally.
 

I anticipate heavy traffic in KY along I-24 and portions of I-65 on E-Day, but again, there's a large array of secondary routes to choose from and the festival atmosphere of Hopkinsville should alleviate some traffic for those like me who are purposefully avoiding large concentrations of people.  I anticipate the festivals strewn along the path will act like magnets; just a matter of avoiding where the "iron filings" of traffic are going to be.

NC doesn't really have any good locations to choose from given the mountainous terrain.  Any augmentation in traffic along those winding 2-lane roads could really cause a problem, and the higher mountain peaks have the worst cloudiness prospects along the track.

I have some options in Nebraska, and that seems like the state to be in.  Wide-open roads, Midwestern grid pattern through a large portion of the state, and lack of nearby large towns should make for easy movement along the track.

 

Oregon?  Yeah, that'll be a mess throughout.  But I don't see 6 million Californians descending on the path of totality or 15-20% of ANY state's population wanting to see totality.  Heck, I can't imagine businesses allowing anywhere NEAR that amount of last-minute vacation requests to free up enough folks to do that, anyway.

 

As much as I'd like to get there days earlier, I probably won't be in position for totality until Sunday.  There might be some traffic on Sunday, but I can't imagine bumper-to-bumper the day prior.

 

Clear Skies,

Phil


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#66 bunyon

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 08:28 AM

I can easily believe 15-20% of Californians WANT to see the eclipse but that's a far cry from them actually going. First, that many people getting the day off would be difficult. Second, kind of wanting to see it and being willing to drive and stay overnight are another.

 

And you may well be right that SC won't be as bad as OR. I've not been to OR (a deep, personal failing). I have lived in the Carolinas for 25 years and the difference in human density here vs. the west is extraordinary. While there are more roads here, it isn't grid like and there is often construction and many small towns. You're never really out of civilization the way you can be west of the Mississippi. Driving back roads in the southeast is a beautiful way to move around.  It is never a fast way. Increase traffic by 25% and it can be hellish.  Hopefully, it'll be clear and work out. For what it's worth, I think it'll be somewhere between the apocalypse some predict and the non-event others predict. If you can manage to check in on Sunday and stay until Tuesday and see the eclipse from where your room is, I doubt you notice any uptick in traffic. Which is my goal.

 

I guess that is my answer as to why I want a room.  I'd like to enjoy the eclipse, not just see it. The idea of rushing in, seeing it and rushing out again doesn't appeal to me.  Of course, I'll have a gassed up car ready to chase sucker holes so I'd obviously rather rush and see it than not.  But, all else equal, I'd rather simply set up outside my air conditioned room to watch it.

 

I'll also be in Nebraska. I worry all of us thinking it the perfect spot is a bad sign.  smile.gif

 

 

EDIT: And, yeah, I can't imagine Sunday or Tuesday will be at all bad.  Even very early Monday and very late Monday will be fine. 


Edited by bunyon, 28 July 2017 - 08:41 AM.

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#67 Bowmoreman

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 09:23 AM

Bowmoreman, the little roads in eastern TN are very narrow, twisty and mountainous. You won't go anywhere fast. And the idea of ragging on California for having too many people in one place while living in the eastern USA is odd. CA is worse than the other western states and LA has bad traffic but, overall, it's much less people dense than the east.

We're all spitballing but while OR will be very crowded my guess is it won't be as bad as SC, NC, TN and KY if it's clear in those states. Which it probably won't be. All of which is why I won't be here.

Yeah, I know about the small, narrow twisty roads... that is a feature in my book...means nobody'll be on em...  the main point is to find a good suckerhole within a few hundred miles (at most), I'll have anywhere from 10-12 hours to do so, and this is key, IF it is required... 20-30mph average speed over roads nobody knows about to get to better weather is a feature. Being stuck on I40 is not. Just like being stuck on the - like - 2 or 3 roads that go from California to Oregon wouldn't be... ;)

I've lived in Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, California, and Massachusetts; each have their pluses and minuses... generally (for me, others mileage does vary!) the less dense, the better. And, California is very dense (where the majority actually live that is). Sure, there's tons of land where nobody is around for 100 miles; but ya gotta GET there (somehow). Heaven help you if a lot of others are trying to get there at the same time.

Arizona has a similar (but lower in magnitude) problem, as does Colorado. Not enough roads for the number of people, basically.

Not saying the Northeast doesn't suck for astro - oh yes, it does... In any event, for the NEXT one, I hope to be living on my 50-100+ acres in Texas hill country...

If it is clear in the eastern states, then we're golden of course. I picked TN because it's "on my way" from another coincident trip, and, importantly, has lots and lots of roads and possibilities to move roughly along the track of the eclipse in either direction IF needed.

In a perfect world, infinite finances, and timing: I'd have likely chosen Wyoming.

Hope that clarifies my "biases" a bit more! ;)


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#68 trurl

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 09:28 AM

Yeah, I know about the small, narrow twisty roads... that is a feature in my book...means nobody'll be on em...

Maybe not as true as it was before GPS. Now they can get "help" finding a way out of a traffic jam and causing another.



#69 Bowmoreman

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 09:33 AM

 

Yeah, I know about the small, narrow twisty roads... that is a feature in my book...means nobody'll be on em...

Maybe not as true as it was before GPS. Now they can get "help" finding a way out of a traffic jam and causing another.

 

True, but down there (in my experience) many of those areas have NO cell coverage. Most people have given up GPS for use of their cell phones instead (e.g. Waze, etc.); so they'll be outta luck.

I'm a firm believer in the DeLorme maps; always available with *complete* context. GPS is like driving using a 2000mm focal length... ;)



#70 Jim Haley

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 09:36 AM

 

Yeah, I know about the small, narrow twisty roads... that is a feature in my book...means nobody'll be on em...

Maybe not as true as it was before GPS. Now they can get "help" finding a way out of a traffic jam and causing another.

 

There was a radio spot on NPR about this recently.  Person going to some cape followed GPS and ended up being delayed for many hours (12+) because bunches of others did the same.   Big problem with GPS.  If traffic totally stopped or if road closed GPS usually misses it.   I used to live in Davidson, NC.  Whenever the nearby interstate got jammed up all the cars and trucks would come through town and the result was GRIDLOCK.   And that was before GPS.  Still I will be chasing clear skies if at all possible, first by boat and then by car.  If in car I hope to stay on an interstate that is inside totallity.  I hope all of SC is clear  on Monday August 21.  (Only about a 10% chance of that though)

 

One can always hope!


Edited by Jim Haley, 28 July 2017 - 09:38 AM.


#71 bunyon

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 09:38 AM

Yeah, if you're thinking 10-12 hours in advance, back roads can be useful.  I was thinking puffy clouds roll in an hour ahead of totality. 

 

Anyway, sounds like you have your ducks in a row.  Good luck.



#72 trurl

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 09:40 AM

 

I'm a firm believer in the DeLorme maps; always available with *complete* context. GPS is like driving using a 2000mm focal length... wink.gif

 

Me too. I have a good collection from many states I have visited. You do need a navigator to use them realtime though.


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#73 bunyon

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 09:41 AM

 

 

Yeah, I know about the small, narrow twisty roads... that is a feature in my book...means nobody'll be on em...

Maybe not as true as it was before GPS. Now they can get "help" finding a way out of a traffic jam and causing another.

 

There was a radio spot on NPR about this recently.  Person going to some cape followed GPS and ended up being delayed for many hours (12+) because bunches of others did the same.   Big problem with GPS.  If traffic totally stopped or if road closed GPS usually misses it.   I used to live in Davidson, NC.  Whenever the nearby interstate got jammed up all the cars and trucks would come through town and the result was GRIDLOCK.   And that was before GPS.  Still I will be chasing clear skies if at all possible, first by boat and then by car.  If in car I hope to stay on an interstate that is inside totallity.  I hope all of SC is clear  on Monday August 21.  (Only about a 10% chance of that though)

 

One can always hope!

 

 

I-77 near Davidson is appalling. It backs up at times with nothing going on.  2am on Thursday, grind to a halt. Unreal.  That's my beef with the east. Sure, cities are hard driving anywhere. But at least in the west you can get away from them. 



#74 Don W

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 10:22 AM

Good points about Oregon being overrun. I think there are some areas in the mid-west that could have a similar problem. Carbondale, Ill. is being touted as "Eclipse Central". If you look at the map, they are very much surrounded by metro areas out to Chicago and Indianapolis, southern Wis. and Michigan, quite a few states south. Of course I'm  talking about that whole area, not just Carbondale. There are a lot of people that are probably heading in that general direction. I started looking for accomodations a bit late, around December, and hotels were already filled up from there west through Missouri. I finally got some rooms at a 3 star motel in Grand Island, NE, but opted instead for a couple in a Holiday Inn located a few miles east in York. Losing about 10 seconds of totality, but the people going with us wanted the nicer room. Both hotels told me they were nearly full at that time.



#75 dghundt

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 10:26 AM

Why not just download google maps region to one's phone?

Then gps will point to the stored map.


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