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Meade Adventure Scope 80

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#276 Hamlet

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Posted 20 July 2019 - 02:42 PM

Another issue is the head of the tripod, the tripod itself is not that bad, But the head it is! So stiff or so loose, and if is in the middle and you'r trying to track jupiter like i did, and it's going to dissapear from the Fov and you need to adjust just a little bit, But it's jump far for what i need, I dissasemble the head and put some lithium grease and it didn't work so well. I search in google now it work the design of the fluid head and it has ball bearings inside, that's the reason why is so smooth, and I thougth...maybe if I modify and try to get a ball bearing inside the head control?...naah!..it would be better if i buy this? https://www.ebay.com...2/202466034856 



#277 Old Man

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Posted 20 July 2019 - 02:47 PM

No reason for a war about it, but that is hard to imagine because an 80 f/5 achro can only be corrected so far without going to ED glass.  (The 70mm f/6.8 TV Ranger illustrated that to me many years ago, since it had noticeable problems with color correction on Jupiter, not up to modern ED standards.)  Do you know what CA looks like in a scope and when looking at the Moon?  (That isn't meant as a swipe/smart aleck comment, I ask because frequently people are not aware of what they are looking for with CA.)  At any sort of high power and best focus for detail you should see a strong violet band along the limb. One can shift past best focus and minimize the violet, but then green replaces it.  And you should see the color change on bright white stars from one side of focus to the other.  Altair and Vega are good test subjects for this aperture presently.

 

Has anyone else with young eyes looked through the scope, focused for their eye and been asked about the color around Jupiter, Altair, the limb of the Moon, etc?  There have been some anecdotes in refractor threads about old eyes vs. young eyes, and folks that didn't see CA with some given achro, then having lens replacement done and realizing the CA was actually quite objectionable after that.

 

Have you made a comparison with an ED or apo?  The difference in color correction is quite substantial visually and it comes through in the image.  I like this 80 f/5 and put a 2" focuser on mine because it was putting up good images of planets (Mars at ~5+ arc seconds at the time),  but the CA was still readily apparent.  Unless there has been an identifiable problem with a particular scope, I have seen the expected progression of increasing color based on the estimated color correction for a given aperture, focal ratio, and glass type.  I can see the difference in glass types, differences in ratio of the same aperture with same glass type, etc. 

 

I did some quick checks tonight and had somewhat better seeing than I have had in recent nights.  150x was pushing it but showing festoon loops in the 80ED, and some large scale detail in the SEB and NEB.  The Meade 80 was topping out at about 100x, even when a #8 yellow filter was added.  Among the more readily identified differences:  in the achro the double line in the SEB was not discernible, nor were the festoon loops.  The 60ED was putting up a somewhat sharper/slightly more detailed image of the planet than the 80 f/5 at similar magnifications.  Aesthetically the 60ED was nicer, but still well short of the 80ED.

Yes, I know what CA is and was expecting this scope to produce a lot of it for the price. But I never tried to use the supplied diagonal or eyepieces, just robbed good ones from my SCT. I have been into astronomy since 1996, so I am not a newbie. I do not do any AP, strictly visual for my own enjoyment.

    Maybe my eyes just do not pick it up or my brain cancels it out, I am at Lat. 39.40 and have blue eyes if that would have any effect. I understand completely what everyone is saying about why it should be showing CA, it is inherent in this design of an acro scope. But for what ever reason, I do not see it and I am getting very crisp and clear views. One  night last fall, the seeing was excellent and I was able to split the Trap in Orion, and with averted vision was able to see 3 of the stars. I was not expecting that out of this cheap scope either, but it did it. I could not be happier, and I do not understand why I do not see any CA or why the views are so great, but this scope just works.

 

         Thanks,  Mike


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#278 tony_spina

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Posted 20 July 2019 - 03:32 PM

Another issue is the head of the tripod, the tripod itself is not that bad, But the head it is! So stiff or so loose, and if is in the middle and you'r trying to track jupiter like i did, and it's going to dissapear from the Fov and you need to adjust just a little bit, But it's jump far for what i need, I dissasemble the head and put some lithium grease and it didn't work so well. I search in google now it work the design of the fluid head and it has ball bearings inside, that's the reason why is so smooth, and I thougth...maybe if I modify and try to get a ball bearing inside the head control?...naah!..it would be better if i buy this? https://www.ebay.com...2/202466034856 

Another option if you are handy is to make a pipe mount

 

you can do a google search for articles on how to make one


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#279 nirvanix

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 02:03 PM

A good read about the capabilities of these ST 80mm scopes can be found at Uncle Rod's Astro Blog:

 

https://uncle-rods.b...ese-scopes.html

 

He had the Celestron version, and used it to good effect on the moon/planets up to about 150x.


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#280 Cirus

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 12:54 AM

I used Meade adventurer 80mm f/5 last night looking at planets for the first time since recollimating.

It's performing better after recollimation, although I still don't have it perfect, but it's much improved.

In poor to average atmospheric conditions that I would describe as 4/10, at x133 magnification, looking at Saturn at 50 degrees altitude, I was able to faintly see the cassini division, chromatic aberration was minimal.

Looking at Jupiter at x133 while the conditions were 3/10 at 45 degrees elevation, north equatorial belt clearly visible, great red spot clearly visible, south equatorial band was very feint, chromatic abberation more apparent.

Looking at an 80% waning gibbous moon on the 50th anniversary of the moon landing! 35 degrees elevation, the internal reflections within the tube were massively apparent, from some angles there was a large light smear in the middle of the field of view. Conditions were 3/10, at x133 moon details were a little blurry, at x67 was much clearer. I may need to look into baffling the inside of the tube!

It was a pretty terrible night to be observing, however I was blown away at how nice Saturn looked at x133 in such a cheap telescope! I had previously seen Saturn prior to recollimation and I couldn't see much more than the rings at that time.

Looking forward to more observations. Just remember that this scope isn't meant for planets! I bought it for portability, travel, wide views for stars and the milky way in darker skies.

Edited by Cirus, 22 July 2019 - 01:12 AM.

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#281 nirvanix

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 05:25 PM

Keep working on collimation and collimate after with the diagonal in place. Flock the dewshield, focuser drawtube, and main tube if you can.


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#282 tony_spina

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 05:32 PM

I used Meade adventurer 80mm f/5 last night looking at planets for the first time since recollimating.

It's performing better after recollimation, although I still don't have it perfect, but it's much improved.

In poor to average atmospheric conditions that I would describe as 4/10, at x133 magnification, looking at Saturn at 50 degrees altitude, I was able to faintly see the cassini division, chromatic aberration was minimal.

Looking at Jupiter at x133 while the conditions were 3/10 at 45 degrees elevation, north equatorial belt clearly visible, great red spot clearly visible, south equatorial band was very feint, chromatic abberation more apparent.

Looking at an 80% waning gibbous moon on the 50th anniversary of the moon landing! 35 degrees elevation, the internal reflections within the tube were massively apparent, from some angles there was a large light smear in the middle of the field of view. Conditions were 3/10, at x133 moon details were a little blurry, at x67 was much clearer. I may need to look into baffling the inside of the tube!

It was a pretty terrible night to be observing, however I was blown away at how nice Saturn looked at x133 in such a cheap telescope! I had previously seen Saturn prior to recollimation and I couldn't see much more than the rings at that time.

Looking forward to more observations. Just remember that this scope isn't meant for planets! I bought it for portability, travel, wide views for stars and the milky way in darker skies.

Look at my post #128 on how to flock this scope


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#283 Hamlet

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 10:41 PM

I used Meade adventurer 80mm f/5 last night looking at planets for the first time since recollimating.

It's performing better after recollimation, although I still don't have it perfect, but it's much improved.

In poor to average atmospheric conditions that I would describe as 4/10, at x133 magnification, looking at Saturn at 50 degrees altitude, I was able to faintly see the cassini division, chromatic aberration was minimal.

Looking at Jupiter at x133 while the conditions were 3/10 at 45 degrees elevation, north equatorial belt clearly visible, great red spot clearly visible, south equatorial band was very feint, chromatic abberation more apparent.

Looking at an 80% waning gibbous moon on the 50th anniversary of the moon landing! 35 degrees elevation, the internal reflections within the tube were massively apparent, from some angles there was a large light smear in the middle of the field of view. Conditions were 3/10, at x133 moon details were a little blurry, at x67 was much clearer. I may need to look into baffling the inside of the tube!

It was a pretty terrible night to be observing, however I was blown away at how nice Saturn looked at x133 in such a cheap telescope! I had previously seen Saturn prior to recollimation and I couldn't see much more than the rings at that time.

Looking forward to more observations. Just remember that this scope isn't meant for planets! I bought it for portability, travel, wide views for stars and the milky way in darker skies.

Hi, how did you recollimate the meade? What do you use?



#284 Jim1804

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 11:37 PM

Finally had clear skies last night, and with the next few looking like rain, I spent a couple of hours in my driveway with my AdventureScope on a photo tripod and two eyepieces (32mm Plossl and Meade 24-8mm zoom). Temps were in the low 80s, with a slight breeze and decently steady skies above 50 degs alt or so).

I took my time working my way down the summer Milky Way, from Cygnus down to Scorpius. I spent a lot of time just sweeping, running over innumerable open clusters and starfields - I’m not even sure what most of them were. I did stop to spend extra time on the Messier highlights in the way.

From my notes:

M29 - In the 32 mm eyepiece it was tiny but a very definite Cluster. In the zoom EP six or seven stars are clearly visible, forming a irregular box with two stars coming off of the top. Not very distinct or impressive in this aperture, but very well defined, and a nice little cluster to have identified.

M27 - Found very quickly coming up from Sagitta as I make my way down the summer Milky Way. Immediately visible, even with direct vision, but small and indistinct. Definitely looks just like a hazy spot, sometimes with averted vision can begin to make out some of the shape that I know is there, so it may partially be averted imagination. This nebula looked fantastic in the same scope last year from the dark skies of Maine.
Put in the zoom EP, and zoomed in on the nebula. With the increased magnification and the darkened background sky the distinct applecore shape is somewhat visible in AV. With direct vision at this magnification it looks like a fingerprint smidge but easy to hold. Still much brighter with averted vision.

M11 - Easily found the Wild Duck Cluster on my trip along the Milky Way at the end of Aquila before Scutum. In the 32 mm EP is a small extended patch of haze, almost looks nebulous, but I am fairly certain that it’s actually just unresolved stars. The haze is very apparent in AV but going in and out withdirect vision. This was much more impressive in a bigger scope, but it’s obvious that many many stars are concentrated in a very tiny area with this rich field set up.

M7 - This set up provides one of the best views of this cluster that I have. The stars fill up about the middle 2/3 of the FOV with more stars out to the edge. The middle of a cluster forms a box type of V-shaped object, with more stars swirling around it in almost a spiral shape. Even with the light pollution, this is an impressive cluster.

M6 - The Butterfly Cluster, compared to Ptolemy’s Cluster, is tiny in the scope. I moved over it several times, having gotten used to the view from the C90 or the C6. But now that I look at it it looks more like a butterfly at this magnification then it does more zoomed in where it is more abstract. There are two distinct stars for the body and the wings are made up of two stars each and got out from the body pointing upward. Very pretty in this field of view.

M8 - The Lagoon Nebula is an object that I’ve had to learn to appreciate. People always compare it with the Orion nebula, and you can see that it’s of similar size. But it doesn’t jump out at you in a small scope from light polluted skies the way Orion does. However, even with this rich field set up, you can clearly see that the nebulosity is broken into two parts, one with two very bright stars relatively speaking, and the other with 4 to 5 smaller stars in a line, you get the feeling there are many more there. The nebulosity is visible with direct vision but brighter and more extensive with averted vision.

M20 - In this setup, the Trifid and Lagoon nebulas are in the same FOV. Nebulosity suggested for the Trifid, but not as bright or obvious as for the Lagoon. 7-8 moderately bright stars visible.

M23 - Found with an eyepiece starhop from the Trifid. Very obvious, unresolved haze in the 32mm EP. Hints of more concentrated areas with AV.
Zooming in, dozens of stars become visible, with many many more in the edge of resolution. Looks best in the 10-12mm zoom range.

M17 - In the same FOV as the Eagle Nebula. Small and faint in these skies. In the FOV, the Eagle looks more round and larger, whereas the Omega is more narrow and elongated. No checkmark shape visible at 32mm.

M16 - Visible with Omega in same FOV. Zooming in showed a little more nebula, visible even with DV.

M22 - Easy find in this scope. Almost in the same 32mm FOV as Kaus Borealis. Obvious and bright in DV. More obvious and brighter in AV. Irregular fuzzball in 32mm. Tried to resolve when zooming in, but never quite made it. For my money, one of the best globs in the sky.

One of the best driveway sessions I’ve had in a long time. This setup with the ST80 is a joy to use - it just got out of the way and let me observe. Amazing what these little workhorse scopes can show you!
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#285 Cirus

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Posted 23 July 2019 - 04:26 AM

Hi, how did you recollimate the meade? What do you use?


I used a cheshire. I needed to recollimate because my stars were badly smeared at high magnification. Now they are airy discs, although still a little bit uneven. But still okay.

Used this instructional

https://youtu.be/Ylb7xnc_03U
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#286 Binojunky

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Posted 23 July 2019 - 09:46 AM

When I go to my annual star party for four days  of camping, drinking and stuffing my fat face I always take the kitchen sink in regards to astro gear, this year will be different. Kim my lady friend is going and we will be taking a load of stuff to sell at the swap table plus extra camping gear like a sunshade. So equipment will be limited due to room in the car and the fact after tramping around a hot camp site all day its bed time pretty early for me anyway. The days of the allnighters are long gone. So it will be the small Meade ST80 ,a simple mount, couple of eyepieces and a pair of 10x50 binoculars.  Last year I hardly used a scope and spent the one clear night we had watching naked eye for meteors, D.


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#287 Jim1804

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Posted 24 July 2019 - 10:38 PM

Binojunky - sounds like a great plan! And don’t worry - I’m sure there will be lots of monster scopes that you’ll be able to look through. :). Hard to beat those wide FOVs though - I have the stock focuser, and with a 1.25 32mm ep get over 4degs - almost binocular range!
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#288 Cirus

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Posted 27 July 2019 - 11:40 PM

I was about to get a view of Jupiter tonight at 55 degrees elevation.

There were several minutes of good seeing, and I was blown away by the views at x133.

I could see the two equatorial belts clearly and their thickness, I could also see the southern polar region. Chromatic aberration was present with a blue/purple glow around the planet, but it was not over powering. There were brief moments where I thought I could see much more, but then the atmosphere visibility deteriorated and it became a race against the encroaching clouds.

I've seen Jupiter many times in my ED100. Though my expectations of the Meade 80 f/5 are much lower, it is still able to amaze me and give great views of the planets to appreciate!

After those views of Jupiter I decided to get lost in the milky way! :)
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#289 corax

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 09:33 AM

I'm looking for piggyback adjustment tips.

 

I have the ScopeStuff kit to piggyback the Adventure Scope 80 onto a C8. I got the CR35 rings (3.5" diameter), with centering screws. The problem is, the rings are a tight fit on the scope: perfect for independent mounting, but scant wiggle room to make adjustments with the centering screws in order to get it aligned with the C8.

 

Do I need to get the next-size-larger rings (4" diameter), or is there some trick I'm missing?



#290 Hamlet

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 09:34 AM

I saw jupiter at 66X and it was amazing! How blurry is the view or Júpiter at 133X?.

Can you take photos of both of your telescopes at the same magnification to compare?



#291 Agatha

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 12:51 PM

I'm looking for piggyback adjustment tips.

 

I have the ScopeStuff kit to piggyback the Adventure Scope 80 onto a C8. I got the CR35 rings (3.5" diameter), with centering screws. The problem is, the rings are a tight fit on the scope: perfect for independent mounting, but scant wiggle room to make adjustments with the centering screws in order to get it aligned with the C8.

 

Do I need to get the next-size-larger rings (4" diameter), or is there some trick I'm missing?

Yes...you need the next size larger.  They will give you the necessary adjustments.  


Edited by Agatha, 28 July 2019 - 12:54 PM.

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#292 Cirus

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 09:30 PM

I saw jupiter at 66X and it was amazing! How blurry is the view or Júpiter at 133X?.
Can you take photos of both of your telescopes at the same magnification to compare?

It's still clear at x133

Photos do not represent what we see with the eyes and the quality of photo largely depends on imaging techniques.

ED100 is clearer, brighter, higher resolution, can magnify further and is free from chromatic aberration.

I am still able to appreciate the view and detail observed on Jupiter through the ST80 despite its flaws and limitations.

Edited by Cirus, 29 July 2019 - 01:38 AM.

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#293 criswille

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 09:40 AM

With my Meade Adventure Scope 80 through the dirty window. Canon 600D prime focus.

 
1
 
2

 

 


Edited by criswille, 29 July 2019 - 09:55 AM.

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#294 Hamlet

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 11:53 PM

What a beauty that birds!



#295 Hamlet

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 12:11 PM

The rings and the dovetail are for what purpose in the telescope?



#296 gkarris

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 02:28 PM

The rings and the dovetail are for what purpose in the telescope?

 

The dovtail mount on there (also on the Adventurescope 60 - what I have) is a tad small and are only really for tripods and small alt-az mounts. Some people need a larger one for using it on either a larger mount like an eq or use it mounted on a much larger scope as a finderscope or for star tracking...

 

Hence you would get rings and a larger dovtail mount.


Edited by gkarris, 01 August 2019 - 02:29 PM.


#297 gkarris

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 02:34 PM

   I have the Meade Infinity 80mm.  I believe it the same exact scope except for the tripod it comes with and the blue color of the OTA.

  I added a GSO dual speed focuser (I know, I know...) but now I can use a 2" eyepiece and get lost in the sky.  I also flocked the tube and dew shield to help improve contrast.   I have to say that for a very inexpensive little achro, I'm having a great time with it.  To relieve some of the CA I put the lens cover cap on with its smaller center cap removed.  It makes the scope an f/9.5 vs f/5 (the hole in the center of the lens cover is 42mm)  The other night I took a look at Jupiter and the rising moon and the view was surprisingly good for these aging eyes smile.gif

 

 

 

 

Clear skies,

Tony

 

I have this scope and love it - that focuser - how is it? Is it worth the upgrade? Is it easy to swap out?

 

Thanks...



#298 Redbetter

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 06:10 PM

The rings and the dovetail are for what purpose in the telescope?

 

Balance when going to heavy 2" accessories, because a longer dovetail attached to rings allows the balance point to be moved back closer to the focuser, and a longer dovetail fits better on most decent mounts. 

 

The other problem with the short dovetail bolted to the tube is that while it is fine for 1.25", it can't handle the weight of a 2" focuser, 2" diagonal and the heaviest 2" eyepieces all together, at least not when side-mounted on typical mounts.   With the dovetail several inches forward of the actual balance point in a heavy 2" configuration there is too much torque on the bolts through the tube and the dovetail shape itself can't help support the load unless it is turned underneath the OTA.  I suspected that would be an issue and tried the fully loaded combo cautiously for a few seconds.  The tube started making sounds that suggested something was going to fail, so I ordered the rings and dovetail that day.


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#299 tony_spina

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 06:25 PM

The other option that will work if you want to avoid the cost and weight of rings to balance 2" eyepieces and diagonals is to use a dovetail bar with a 1/4 - 20 adjustable screw
 
IMG_7306-1.jpg
 

 

 


Edited by tony_spina, 01 August 2019 - 06:26 PM.

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#300 Hamlet

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 07:46 PM

So the dovetail and the rings are used when the upgrades are too heavy right?




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