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Solar glasses?

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7 replies to this topic

#1 RightWill

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:54 PM

I purchased 5 pairs of cheap solar glasses for my family to view the eclipse. However are these good for looking through my telescope? They are the correct ISO 12312-2 glasses. Thanks.



#2 opticsguy

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 10:02 PM

Thank you for asking this question, the answer is;

NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  

You will be instantly blinded for the rest of your life!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

NO for any telescope.

NO for any binocular.

No for any optical instrument whatsoever!!!!!!

NO!!!!!!


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#3 Gary Z

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 10:06 PM

What brand of solar glasses are these?  I know Lunt solar glasses are ISO certified.  One way you can tell about good solar lens or protection is put them up to a very bright light source and you should not be able to see the lamp or light source.  Ensure also that there are no pin holes anywhere while looking near the light source.  

 

 

As for looking using these through any occular device....no...that is not what they were intended for.  They make solar filters for binoculars and telescopes....

 

Take care,

 

Gary


Edited by Gary Z, 12 August 2017 - 10:12 PM.


#4 JamesMStephens

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 10:18 PM

Take a look at the list of reputable sources here:

http://abcnews.go.co...ory?id=49116565

 

Amazon has been selling glasses from a number of manufacturers, however I received a recall notice from them for viewing glasses advertised as "CE & ISO 12312" compliant.  They have apparently removed advertising for any supplier who hasn't verified that their filters were sourced from a reputable manufacturer.  Presumably the glasses that they are still offering are safe.



#5 alstarjoey

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 10:56 PM

Those solar glasses will protect you for the amount of light going through your pupil when you look at the eclipse.

If you look through your C9.25, you will be taking all the light gathering capability of your telescope and squeezing it down to the size of your pupil.

How much power can those cheap solar glasses absorb before melting?

How long will it take for the cheap solar glasses to be destroyed? (will you have time to react?)

What is the consequences of the failure of the cheap solar glasses? 

 

Get a solar filter for your telescope and preserve your and your families eyesight

 

 

two dogs and a telescope



#6 JamesMStephens

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 12:06 AM

I purchased 5 pairs of cheap solar glasses for my family to view the eclipse. However are these good for looking through my telescope? They are the correct ISO 12312-2 glasses. Thanks.

What do you intend to do, wear a pair of these while looking through an unfiltered 9.25" (or any, for that matter) telescope?  The answer is--definitely not!  

 

If you want a filter for your telescope, look at the June Sky & Telescope and here;

https://www.cloudyni...-the-film-only/


Edited by JamesMStephens, 13 August 2017 - 12:07 AM.


#7 WALee

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 12:10 AM

I think you got the messaged from these posts. DON'T DO IT



#8 dotnet

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:20 AM

Solar filters need to go in front of the aperture, i.e. they need to be facing the sun. If you're watching naked eye the filter goes between the sun and your eye. If you're watching through binoculars or a telescope the filter goes between the sun and the instrument's objective (forward) lens.

 

If you put the filter between your eye and the telescope's or binocular's eyepiece then the sun will first burn a whole in the filter and then in your cornea. Think ant and magnifying glass, with your eye taking the place of the ant.


Edited by dotnet, 13 August 2017 - 09:21 AM.



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