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Basic solar observing question - solar with Barska 15x70's

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#1 MarkVIIIMarc

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 11:33 PM

Hello,

 

Since I'm in Missouri and have the eclipse coming up I decided to buy some Galileo G-SFB70 solar filters for my Barksa 15x70's.  They arrived UPS today and I put them on my binoculars.  They actually fit pretty well.  I rolled back the rubber casing, put the filters on the front and rolled the rubber casing up over them making for a pretty tight fit.

 

How do I tell if these filters are good? 

 

The fit is tight.  I might even tape them on when in use. 

 

When looking through the binoculars with the filters installed at the brightest lights in my home I have to wait for my pupils to dilate before I can see any light at all.

 

Is there any official way to test them?

 

If they were bad what are the signs?



#2 Thomas Marshall

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 01:22 AM

The light from the sun is much brighter that indoor lights, so it is no surprise to me it is faint indoors. Take them outdoors, - if you are afraid they might be defective just hold them up to the sun naked eye to look for pinhole leaks and see how the image looks. If OK, then try them on fully over the binoculars, - look for sunspots, - look for brief periods and assess if you think they are affecting you eyes. Personally, I don't think you have anything to worry about here. I have Barska 15x70's, - you can send them to ME for testing, - before the 21st please.grin.gif   EDIT, - I looked up your filters, they are stopped down to approx. 1" dia. filter material. Please post how they perform, - I would be much interested. Thanks


Edited by Thomas Marshall, 13 August 2017 - 01:41 AM.


#3 jjt312b

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:31 AM

I test my filters by standing a bright flashlight on end and placing the solar filter directly on top. I then  hold a black sheet of paper or cardboard a few inches over top and look at the bottom of the paper/cardboard to see if any pinpoints of light. If none, I know I'm good. If any, in the trash it goes. 

 

For the flashlight I use my Celestron Power Tank as the light from it's flashlight is incredibly bright. If you have one that is an ideal light source for this test.



#4 MarkVIIIMarc

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 10:14 AM

So I took them out today, held them over the concrete, looked like nothing was getting through, looked through them, the sun was a neat yellow ball. Put them on the binoculars and holding them above the concrete it looked like no light was getting through. Looked through em at the sky, darkness!

Eventually I found the sun, it was more difficult than I thought to find it and I had to resist the urge to look around the binoculars to center on the sun like I do at night sometimes.

I found it, focused, lost it, found it again after a few moments and saw a textured yellow/orange ball. Not sure if it was solar texture or heat in the atmosphere I was seeing. No sunspots or flares but I didn't stare for long. Maybe I'll try again later.

#5 Don W

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 10:27 AM

To find the sun with binos, face the sun and look just below it. Then bring the binos up to your eyes. All you need to do is swing up a bit and voila! Sol!

 

As to the eclipse, you want to be able to remove the filters during totality. The views of the corona and possible prominences is amazing. Remember, filters during the partial phases, no filters during totality.



#6 jjt312b

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 11:48 AM

Yes, like Don said. A tripod if you have one that accommodates binoculars is incredibly helpful for view stability, especially if your binos are very heavy.



#7 Thomas Marshall

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 09:15 PM

The filters you bought will not show flares/prominences , but will show sunspots if there is any sunspot activity. Other posters have been indicating there has been very little sunspot activity lately. The types of filters used to observe flares etc. are very expensive. However, - If you are in the path of the TOTAL Eclipse you may possibly see flares/prominences in the Corona during the period of totality. I'll be homebound in AZ, with approx. 70 percent partial eclipse, so no chance for me to view Corona.


Edited by Thomas Marshall, 14 August 2017 - 09:22 PM.



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