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How to find the sun

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16 replies to this topic

#1 Todd_N

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 05:19 PM

Ok, the title sounds dumb and I am sure it is, but I bought a solar filter for my celesteon C-8 and I am finding it next to impossible to find the sun in the eyepiece.

 

I made an adapter to use my C-8's filter on my AT72ED which made it slightly easier to find the sun but it still was not very easy.

 

Bottom line, how in the heck do you align your scope to the sun?



#2 DLuders

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 05:29 PM

Once they are stocked again from the recent Total Solar Eclipse buying frenzy, consider getting a Helio Pod Sun Finder:  http://farlaboratori...m/dyna-hp1.html


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#3 IVM

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 06:25 PM

I just minimize the shadow of the tube. Piece of cake.


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#4 gezak22

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 06:45 PM

I just minimize the shadow of the tube. Piece of cake.

This!


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#5 cherron3

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 06:56 PM

tele vue makes a great finder for about 30 bucks;  used it during recent eclipse with no problems


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#6 james7ca

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 07:00 PM

Depends upon your focal length and field of view (i.e. "minimize the shadow of the tube"). The easiest and quickest method I've found is to use a so-called solar finder as mentioned by DLuders. Then, you can also make your own with a pinhole, a piece of rigid tubing, and a translucent "screen." In any case, I use one of Tele Vue's Sol Searcher units and it's mounted permanently to my solar telescope.

 

  https://www.optcorp....sun-finder.html


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#7 lbim

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 07:02 PM

"Posted 20 August 2017 - 02:33 PM  by S.Boerner  here

If there is no time to get something else you can resort to putting a finish nail in a board that is long enough to span your scopes aperture.  Make the nail as perpendicular as possible.  Hole the board over the apeture and move the scope until the shadow of the nail merges with the nail itself...it is a gnomon!"

Try it, it worked for me yesterday during the eclipse time.

LBIM
 


 



#8 tomwall

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 08:16 PM

This seems simple:

https://www.cloudyni...2-1-sun-finder/



#9 Todd_N

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 07:14 AM

Thanks everyone. As soon as the clouds part, I will try some of these.



#10 dsnope

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 09:24 AM

I often just remove the diagonal and move the scope until the sunlight comes out the back in a circle

#11 mikerepp

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 09:28 AM

I also have taken out the EP and just looked into the diagonal to align.  Works very easily and its very quick if you don't have a Sol finder.


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#12 George Bailey

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 10:54 AM

I have a solar filter for my finder scope.

 

http://www.telescope...rd=solar filter

 

I find that my solar finder puts the sun in the finder scope, and the finder scope dials it into the main scope fov.



#13 MalVeauX

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 09:17 AM



Ok, the title sounds dumb and I am sure it is, but I bought a solar filter for my celesteon C-8 and I am finding it next to impossible to find the sun in the eyepiece.

 

I made an adapter to use my C-8's filter on my AT72ED which made it slightly easier to find the sun but it still was not very easy.

 

Bottom line, how in the heck do you align your scope to the sun?

Heya,

 

On my big long scope, I do this:

 

1) I point it in the general direction.

2) I minimize the shadow I see on my lens hood.

3) I look through my 40mm finder scope that has a white light solar filter installed on it with a wide FOV to see the sun and center it in the cross hairs.

4) Look through the main scope and look for whatever feature I'm after, because its aligned with the finder scope.

 

I also have a televue solar finder that works great on smaller scopes just to get pointed in the right direction. I prefer the finder scope alignment I use above for my really long instruments.

 

Example of the aligned finder scope with a white light filter on it:

 

34313004040_6b89716650_c.jpg

 

36722945385_e03e8d2f89_c.jpg

 

Very best,



#14 44ye

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 10:28 AM

A permanently mounted aligned sol finder with adjustment screws is better than a removable one because once adjusted to where the scope is pointed you are done . The removable type will get you close but you will still have the same problem getting truly aligned .Like getting your spotting scope pointed at the same star as your main scope . I own both types. If you can find a filter  to fit your spotting scope as per post 13  that would be great you are done and not adding permanent weight.

 

44ye

Don 



#15 Terrybythe sea

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Posted 22 August 2020 - 03:08 PM

I also have taken out the EP and just looked into the diagonal to align.  Works very easily and its very quick if you don't have a Sol finder.


I tried this this morning and it was indeed quick and easy. I set my scope's altitude to the sun's, as reported by SkySafari, and then just hunted around in azimuth a bit till I found it, got it centred in an eyepiece, and achieved a solar system alignment with little trouble. Thanks for the tip.

#16 StarHugger

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 06:04 PM

I use the scopes shadow on my observing chair, when the shadow is just the profile of the very front of the scope your on target. Of course using your widest field eyepiece will help too. My old 60mm sears achromat had instructions for locating the sun and this is certainly an effective means as well you never have to look up at all so any direct viewing of the sun in completely avoided.

#17 seasparky89

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 09:23 PM

TeleVue Solfinder.  Inexpensive, simple, safe and fast.  Works like a dream on my Lunt 60mm scope.


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