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So - after all of the Weather Angst - Where was it Cloudy?

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#26 Tedrick

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 05:44 PM

Led a group of six to observe Totality on the campus of Volunteer State Community College, Gallatin, TN. Clear skies ruled the day. Didn't need to sacrifice eclipse virgins to the cloud gods even though there was no shortage of suitable victims. Great programs, friendly staff, excellent facilities and perfect sightlines. Cumulus low on the horizon never presented a threat. Instead, they enhanced the Shadow's approach and 360 degree sunset. No shadowbands observed, unfortunately.


Edited by Tedrick, 23 August 2017 - 05:48 PM.


#27 stevesheriw

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 06:39 PM

I also got completely clouded out in St. Joseph.  I knew I could only get one day off work, so a year ago I reserved a motel in St. Jo, reserved a rental car from the Kansas City airport, and bought a plane ticket returning later that night.  About 4-5 days before is when the weather predictions began to slide in the wrong direction.  Waking up on the 21st, it was fairly gloomy with a few rare patches of blue here and there.  It only got worse.  Having to bring the car back for an evening flight out limited my mobility, so no bolting in the direction of St. Louis or western Nebraska, which is what I would have done if time was not an issue.  I actually saw first contact and a brief look at the sun when it was 25% eclipsed.  It rained after that, and everyone in the Motel 6 parking lot was fairly bummed.  So much waiting, hope, and anticipation.  Apparently, the people at Rosecrans airport to the west got a brief peek at the sun in totality.  My guess is the vast majority of everyone else in St. Jo and surrounding areas did not cross this off their bucket list.  

 

Other than here, it looks like another town in Nebraska and someone in Carbondale missed the big event as well.  I saw the animation of the shadow passing over the country, and it appears most of the cloud cover was in the Midwest and maybe some of South Carolina.  



#28 bunyon

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 07:24 PM

I've talked to a few folks in the Carolinas who were clouded out.  The SC ones were puffy clouds they were unable to avoid. The NC one was just a complete loss.  I'm not sure where they were exactly.  The friends who saw it saw it through holes.



#29 Rich_W

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 08:14 PM

Hot, humid and clear in Harriman TN, all day, couldn't have been better. Cumulus clouds appeared on the horizon especially north and west, about an hour before first contact, but never closed in and were not a problem.  My first eclipse experience and it was stunning, everything I could have hoped for. 


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#30 gdi

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 08:20 PM

I had to decide between two locations in Brevard, NC. One at a friend's house with a little less than a minute totality or my sister's place farther southwest with a few seconds less than 2 minutes. I went to the site with more totality.

All morning it was clear and beautiful. Then just as C1 approached the clouds arrived, but we got intermittent good views at the partial. It remained heavily overcast and we were pretty bummed (having driven over 800 miles), until maybe a minute before C2. As we watched, the only clear patch in the area got closer and closer and finally thigs cleaered enough for a great view as totality arrived.

It was amazing and I felt like I was transported to a sci-fi planet with a ringed black sun. The 3 dimensionality was unexpected and surreal.

I talked with my friend and there was no clearing across town, so we made the right decison.

#31 Bill G.

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 08:24 PM

I was in Turtletown, TN. A few miles from the NC border. We had some clouds threaten but cleared up before show time. My daughter was in Carlisle, SC. They saw almost all of the partial but clouds moved in a few minutes before totality. They got about a 5 sec peek between the clouds before totality ended.



#32 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 08:25 PM

Only good news to report from  Loudon ,Tennessee  at the Tennessee Valley Winery.

 

Weather was perfect from sunrise through the whole day.....I planned it with an option to travel elsewhere if I had to.  but it was super......

 

it was however  96 degrees... at some point the sweat can drip onto one of your eye pieces as I learned. My home made solar filters I made from thousand oaks silver black polymer   and pringle potato chip cans were super and were a big hit with the folks around me.

 

the temp dropped 10 degrees BTW. and   birds went into the trees...insects made their respective noises.  I did note that the two horse in the field right next to us seemed unfazed.....the human beings appeared  to be greatly affected and awed   starting with me....    



#33 mycroft10

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 09:09 PM

Viewed the eclipse at the ball park stadium right on the 1st base line right on the centerline in Lexington South Carolina. The day started completely clear but as the hours went by there were more puffy pieces of cloud that went by overhead. It wasn't that bad at all the sky was 80 to 90% clear most of the time. It makes you worry a bit though as all it takes is only one cloud in the wrong place to miss totality. As the moon covered the sun with the cooling effect with less solar radiation these odd bits of cloud completely disappeared. The sky was really completely clear for totality.  Only cloud seen at that time was right on the horizon. With all the possible negatives predicted for the east coast weather patterns it just turned out to be perfect place to be in the end. There was more than a thousand people in the stadium for the eclipse.


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#34 joseph07081

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 09:55 PM

I also got completely clouded out in St. Joseph.  I knew I could only get one day off work, so a year ago I reserved a motel in St. Jo, reserved a rental car from the Kansas City airport, and bought a plane ticket returning later that night.  About 4-5 days before is when the weather predictions began to slide in the wrong direction.  Waking up on the 21st, it was fairly gloomy with a few rare patches of blue here and there.  It only got worse.  Having to bring the car back for an evening flight out limited my mobility, so no bolting in the direction of St. Louis or western Nebraska, which is what I would have done if time was not an issue.  I actually saw first contact and a brief look at the sun when it was 25% eclipsed.  It rained after that, and everyone in the Motel 6 parking lot was fairly bummed.  So much waiting, hope, and anticipation.  Apparently, the people at Rosecrans airport to the west got a brief peek at the sun in totality.  My guess is the vast majority of everyone else in St. Jo and surrounding areas did not cross this off their bucket list.  

 

Other than here, it looks like another town in Nebraska and someone in Carbondale missed the big event as well.  I saw the animation of the shadow passing over the country, and it appears most of the cloud cover was in the Midwest and maybe some of South Carolina.  

We were not only clouded out, but rained out as well at Rosecrans Airport. The rain stopped just before totality, but the clouds looked solid. After setting up and tearing down my equipment 3 times, I gave up and just resigned myself to watching and shooting iPhone panoramas. My girlfriend did manage to catch a few seconds of iPhone video of totality while I was shooting my panorama. She caught diamond ring and Bailey's Beads for a few seconds before the sun disappeared. The shame of it was that I had a good polar alignment before the first rain hit and I had to tear down. 



#35 LesB

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 10:18 PM

Sunset Rock in Highlands NC was planned, but several groups abandoned the area due to clouds.  We were torn.  We ended up driving about 30 minutes to Franklin NC, where there was less cloud cover but we only made it with about 5 minutes to totality.  It was stressful, but we had a great experience.

Was in Highlands, NC.  The cloud cover allowed a peek at the eclipse when about 95+% total.    There were about 25 people there at VZ Top and I had the only telescope.  Got some quick pics handheld with 400mm x 1.4.  Not great but a souvenir.  Enthusiastic group though and I go some shots the after 3rd contact.   Not a complete loss.  Got to see what was left of eclipse through the telescope and some sunspots were visible.  Some in the group had never seen sunspots.    


Edited by LesB, 23 August 2017 - 10:20 PM.


#36 polaroidia

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 11:24 PM

The forecast for southern Illinois was dire to say the least. 75 percent cloud cover and thunderstorms around the time of eclipse were forecast only 12 hours before. But Chester, Illinois (about 65 miles south of St. Louis) where I saw the eclipse was virtually cloud free until about 10 minutes AFTER totality. Even then, I was able to photograph the final phases in between the clouds. As a matter of fact, the weather person said the best place to see the eclipse would be Carbondale, IL and into Kentucky. As I understand it they wound up having more clouds than where I was. Unless it's already overcast and pouring, never trust the weather forecast. All in all it was a magnificent eclipse and day.



#37 AUricle

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 09:43 AM

I left a more full account here... https://www.cloudyni...dpost&p=8063955

 

Briefly, we were near Rocheport MO. 2 miles south of I-70  and 2 miles north of the MO River, and 10 miles west of Columbia. We had a  great viewing site,...but....

Cirrus built during the partial phase and a lower cloud band became more persistent starting about 15 min before totality. Really began to mess with visual views and totally skunked my scripted cam/scope.

Ended up with a few badly clouded blurry shots at my longest exposure times. 

Miraculously, we got about a 6-7 second 'window during mid-totality, the suddenness of which floored our group of 20. Another dark cloud shrouded the rest of totality until the moment the Diamond Ring appeared at C3. It was stunning......but the weather stole the show.

BIg temp drop going into totality...at least 15 degree drop, and a stiff breeze kicked up suddenly making it feel even cooler. I swore it was about to rain during totality.

As fast as that weather came in, within 20 min post-totality, the clouds and wind were GONE and it was sunny, hot, and humid again.

It was physically and emotionally draining experience, and my family swore we'd be somewhere on the center line  on April 8, 2024..... 



#38 bookemdano

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 10:16 AM

I left a more full account here... https://www.cloudyni...dpost&p=8063955

 

Briefly, we were near Rocheport MO. 2 miles south of I-70  and 2 miles north of the MO River, and 10 miles west of Columbia. We had a  great viewing site,...but....

Cirrus built during the partial phase and a lower cloud band became more persistent starting about 15 min before totality. Really began to mess with visual views and totally skunked my scripted cam/scope.

Ended up with a few badly clouded blurry shots at my longest exposure times. 

Miraculously, we got about a 6-7 second 'window during mid-totality, the suddenness of which floored our group of 20. Another dark cloud shrouded the rest of totality until the moment the Diamond Ring appeared at C3. It was stunning......but the weather stole the show.

BIg temp drop going into totality...at least 15 degree drop, and a stiff breeze kicked up suddenly making it feel even cooler. I swore it was about to rain during totality.

As fast as that weather came in, within 20 min post-totality, the clouds and wind were GONE and it was sunny, hot, and humid again.

It was physically and emotionally draining experience, and my family swore we'd be somewhere on the center line  on April 8, 2024..... 

I hear you. I was southwest of you a bit. Got to Boonville around 8am and things looked pretty good there, but really wanted to get further south to avoid the potential encroachment of low/mid-level stuff from the north. Decided to jog down state highway 5 and potentially get to Jeff City, but along the way found a nice roadside park near Bunceton and since I knew I needed a couple of hours to set up just decided to take the chance there--it was blue sky with some wispy cirrus stuff around, so looked pretty decent compared to my original plans to be in Doniphan County KS (west of St Joe).

 

After I had stuff set up and maybe 20 mins before C1, the **** thunderstorm development to the southwest started encroaching on where we were and looked like it wasn't going to clear out. By then it was getting too late to move and I didn't really see anywhere within driving distance at that late hour that looked much better. If I hadn't planned on using so much equipment and only cared about viewing totality I'd have probably been more willing to just hop in the car and drive around looking for better skies. But I wanted the full C1->C4 experience (and to photograph it) so I just wasn't prepared for a last minute scramble.

 

By the time C1 started, the sun was visible through the clouds and mist, but my pre-programmed SEM script exposures were all based on clear sky and so I didn't even load the script. I put the cams on Av and just used my remote releases to occasionally snap photos of the partial phases. Some are usable, some are not. At many points from C1->C2 lower clouds partially or completely blocked the sun. 

 

I was very fortunate that the entire totality was visible though. There was a hole in the lower clouds that allowed us to view it through the higher stuff. I ran my SEM emergency script (in hindsight I didn't spend nearly enough time making a better emergency script) so I got a couple of decent photos during totality. 

 

But I know the corona would have been so much better (and my photos of it so much better) if I hadn't had to view it through clouds. So I've got this weird cognitive dissonance where I know I should feel grateful that at least I got to see totality, and I do. I observed the corona and even saw some prominences through binoculars. And I got a couple of photos I can severely tweak in PS and maybe get something usable.

 

But in terms of what I'd been planning (and what I know others in better weather got to see) I feel a lot of let-down as well. I think all the more so because as of 9am I thought I'd successfully evaded the cloud cover, only to have it crawl back over me when it was too late. It was just so demoralizing.

 

Thank God we get a do-over. For 2024 I will spend much more time contingency planning (not only in terms of actual plans but just mentally as well). I basically spent all my free time this summer planning for this eclipse, but never once did "what will I do if it's cloudy" enter my mind. That was a mistake, because if I'd been more prepared for the conditions I ended up with on Monday I could have salvaged more decent photos and also just focused on enjoying the experience I was able to get rather than stewing about how mother nature screwed me over on a day I'd been anticipating for five years.

 

Live and learn!


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#39 mwayne

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 11:46 AM

We drove from Dallas Sunday and stayed in Jackson Tennessee so I could pick from southern Illinois to east of Nashville depending on the morning forecast. The local TV weather was very vague and almost completely useless, I'm wondering if that was intentional, to keep people from mobbing a particular area. Based mostly on internet weather sites Monday morning made the decision to go to Hopkinsville Kentucky and other that a little bit of horsehair cirrus had clear skies for the entire event. My original plan was to go to southeast Nebraska to meet a friend there but would have been clouded out, she went to Eastern Wyoming and had clear skies.

#40 Calypte

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 12:00 PM

100% clear at Menan, ID.  High clouds the two previous days, and high clouds when I went to bed late Sunday night.  But conditions at eclipse time were perfect.



#41 bookemdano

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 12:05 PM

We drove from Dallas Sunday and stayed in Jackson Tennessee so I could pick from southern Illinois to east of Nashville depending on the morning forecast. The local TV weather was very vague and almost completely useless, I'm wondering if that was intentional, to keep people from mobbing a particular area. Based mostly on internet weather sites Monday morning made the decision to go to Hopkinsville Kentucky and other that a little bit of horsehair cirrus had clear skies for the entire event. My original plan was to go to southeast Nebraska to meet a friend there but would have been clouded out, she went to Eastern Wyoming and had clear skies.

I think actually, local weather stations are vague because they are largely funded by local businesses buying advertisements, and those local businesses don't want the mets telling everyone to leave and find blue sky elsewhere. I experienced that here in KC--whereas the NWS was clearly showing that the KC area was looking worse and that better (though certainly not 100%) chances were to be found to the southeast of here, the attitude of the local station mets was "cautious optimism" for KC coupled with "it's really not any better anywhere else in the region so you might as well stay put"

 

It was really worthless advice and I feel bad for all the people who stayed in St. Joe & KC because they trusted the local station mets to give them complete info.


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#42 dane lambson

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 03:11 PM

I was in  Casper Wy which was not looking real good 5 days out, but improved fir the next 4 days.  The night before they forcast a a band of cirrus to come in at totality.  

Here is a sky shot during totality: https://www.facebook...10710994&type=3

 

 

Here are the resulting photos though:https://www.facebook...e=3&pnref=story

Dane


Edited by dane lambson, 24 August 2017 - 03:19 PM.


#43 bunyon

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 03:15 PM

Local TV news is, in general and all subjects, pretty poor.  Their weather is just a summation of NOAA over a large area.  

 

I found the online models and forecasts for my area pretty accurate and it let us find a hole through which to watch.


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#44 AUricle

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 04:35 PM

 

I left a more full account here... https://www.cloudyni...dpost&p=8063955

 

Briefly, we were near Rocheport MO. 2 miles south of I-70  and 2 miles north of the MO River, and 10 miles west of Columbia. We had a  great viewing site,...but....

Cirrus built during the partial phase and a lower cloud band became more persistent starting about 15 min before totality. Really began to mess with visual views and totally skunked my scripted cam/scope.

Ended up with a few badly clouded blurry shots at my longest exposure times. 

Miraculously, we got about a 6-7 second 'window during mid-totality, the suddenness of which floored our group of 20. Another dark cloud shrouded the rest of totality until the moment the Diamond Ring appeared at C3. It was stunning......but the weather stole the show.

BIg temp drop going into totality...at least 15 degree drop, and a stiff breeze kicked up suddenly making it feel even cooler. I swore it was about to rain during totality.

As fast as that weather came in, within 20 min post-totality, the clouds and wind were GONE and it was sunny, hot, and humid again.

It was physically and emotionally draining experience, and my family swore we'd be somewhere on the center line  on April 8, 2024..... 

I hear you. I was southwest of you a bit. Got to Boonville around 8am and things looked pretty good there, but really wanted to get further south to avoid the potential encroachment of low/mid-level stuff from the north. Decided to jog down state highway 5 and potentially get to Jeff City, but along the way found a nice roadside park near Bunceton and since I knew I needed a couple of hours to set up just decided to take the chance there--it was blue sky with some wispy cirrus stuff around, so looked pretty decent compared to my original plans to be in Doniphan County KS (west of St Joe).

 

After I had stuff set up and maybe 20 mins before C1, the **** thunderstorm development to the southwest started encroaching on where we were and looked like it wasn't going to clear out. By then it was getting too late to move and I didn't really see anywhere within driving distance at that late hour that looked much better. If I hadn't planned on using so much equipment and only cared about viewing totality I'd have probably been more willing to just hop in the car and drive around looking for better skies. But I wanted the full C1->C4 experience (and to photograph it) so I just wasn't prepared for a last minute scramble.

 

By the time C1 started, the sun was visible through the clouds and mist, but my pre-programmed SEM script exposures were all based on clear sky and so I didn't even load the script. I put the cams on Av and just used my remote releases to occasionally snap photos of the partial phases. Some are usable, some are not. At many points from C1->C2 lower clouds partially or completely blocked the sun. 

 

I was very fortunate that the entire totality was visible though. There was a hole in the lower clouds that allowed us to view it through the higher stuff. I ran my SEM emergency script (in hindsight I didn't spend nearly enough time making a better emergency script) so I got a couple of decent photos during totality. 

 

But I know the corona would have been so much better (and my photos of it so much better) if I hadn't had to view it through clouds. So I've got this weird cognitive dissonance where I know I should feel grateful that at least I got to see totality, and I do. I observed the corona and even saw some prominences through binoculars. And I got a couple of photos I can severely tweak in PS and maybe get something usable.

 

But in terms of what I'd been planning (and what I know others in better weather got to see) I feel a lot of let-down as well. I think all the more so because as of 9am I thought I'd successfully evaded the cloud cover, only to have it crawl back over me when it was too late. It was just so demoralizing.

 

Thank God we get a do-over. For 2024 I will spend much more time contingency planning (not only in terms of actual plans but just mentally as well). I basically spent all my free time this summer planning for this eclipse, but never once did "what will I do if it's cloudy" enter my mind. That was a mistake, because if I'd been more prepared for the conditions I ended up with on Monday I could have salvaged more decent photos and also just focused on enjoying the experience I was able to get rather than stewing about how mother nature screwed me over on a day I'd been anticipating for five years.

 

Live and learn!

 

bedano,

Man I am really really tryin' not to go there and get in a funk over it.

6 seconds of totality is barely enough time for a picture or impression to set in, and yeah the last second view of the DR at C3 was incredible, but it's all so bittersweet.

Compound that with some major and minor errors I made, and I'm beginning to wonder if I shouldn't have left MYSELF at home lol.gif

As I'm 65 now, I certainly want to think I'll be around in 2024 to try this again. I'm planning on it.

Ahh well, sometimes I just gotta laugh at myself, otherwise I'd take a hammer to my own head.

Here's hoping we can compare notes in '24........



#45 AUricle

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 04:41 PM

 

We drove from Dallas Sunday and stayed in Jackson Tennessee so I could pick from southern Illinois to east of Nashville depending on the morning forecast. The local TV weather was very vague and almost completely useless, I'm wondering if that was intentional, to keep people from mobbing a particular area. Based mostly on internet weather sites Monday morning made the decision to go to Hopkinsville Kentucky and other that a little bit of horsehair cirrus had clear skies for the entire event. My original plan was to go to southeast Nebraska to meet a friend there but would have been clouded out, she went to Eastern Wyoming and had clear skies.

I think actually, local weather stations are vague because they are largely funded by local businesses buying advertisements, and those local businesses don't want the mets telling everyone to leave and find blue sky elsewhere. I experienced that here in KC--whereas the NWS was clearly showing that the KC area was looking worse and that better (though certainly not 100%) chances were to be found to the southeast of here, the attitude of the local station mets was "cautious optimism" for KC coupled with "it's really not any better anywhere else in the region so you might as well stay put"

 

It was really worthless advice and I feel bad for all the people who stayed in St. Joe & KC because they trusted the local station mets to give them complete info.

 

I think your assessment is on target. I posted a similar view just 2 days prior to the eclipse.

In fact I KNOW I've seen it happen many, many times.

The "big boys" do it too, especially around potential storms....they spur people to go out and stock up on essentials......then the storm is a pussycat...... 


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#46 jcastarz

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 06:43 PM

We had a little bit of a nail biter in Newberry,  SC. Between first contact and totality, there were building storm clouds that, until about 15 minutes before totality, threatened the show. But thankfully, the clouds moved completely out of the way giving us clear skies for the rest of the afternoon. 

A friend and I had traveled to an eclipse party just southwest of Newberry, SC, on route 121.  Around halfway to totality a rain cloud moved in from the northeast and it actually began to rain!  My friend and I left the party and drove seven miles south on 121 to get back out into the sun.  We stopped at a country store and parked there to watch the entire event in a clear sky.  I phoned back to the party to let them know where we had found sunny skies in case some decided to make a run for it, and - miracle of miracles - the sky had cleared for them, too!  Everyone had a good day!


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#47 mwedel

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 11:47 PM

It's my understanding it started cloudy in Alliance, but the clouds parted for the totality show, so I could have stayed put. 

I was in Alliance and it was a nail-biter. Clear when we drove in, right about C1. But there was a brisk north wind and scattered clouds started passing over, occasionally completely blocking the sun for a few seconds. A few minutes before totality, a real monster drifted in. This was the view with 5 minutes to go until showtime:

 

Crescent Sun through clouds

 

BUT that big cloud kept on moving. Here's the Diamond Ring just before C2:

 

Diamond ring
 
And then those last wisps of cloud moved on and it was perfectly clear for all of totality. I don't remember any clouds in the whole second half of the eclipse, either. So we were all very happy - we got a great view of totality, and in retrospect the big cloud added a bit of additional suspense. It was easy to be happy afterwards since things had gone well. If that cloud had come by even a couple of minutes later, it would have been pretty frustrating.

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#48 Markab

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 11:04 AM

I also got completely clouded out in St. Joseph.  I knew I could only get one day off work, so a year ago I reserved a motel in St. Jo, reserved a rental car from the Kansas City airport, and bought a plane ticket returning later that night.  About 4-5 days before is when the weather predictions began to slide in the wrong direction.  Waking up on the 21st, it was fairly gloomy with a few rare patches of blue here and there.  It only got worse.  Having to bring the car back for an evening flight out limited my mobility, so no bolting in the direction of St. Louis or western Nebraska, which is what I would have done if time was not an issue.  I actually saw first contact and a brief look at the sun when it was 25% eclipsed.  It rained after that, and everyone in the Motel 6 parking lot was fairly bummed.  So much waiting, hope, and anticipation.  Apparently, the people at Rosecrans airport to the west got a brief peek at the sun in totality.  My guess is the vast majority of everyone else in St. Jo and surrounding areas did not cross this off their bucket list.  

 

Other than here, it looks like another town in Nebraska and someone in Carbondale missed the big event as well.  I saw the animation of the shadow passing over the country, and it appears most of the cloud cover was in the Midwest and maybe some of South Carolina.  

Sorry that you missed it Steve, I was just northeast of KC in Lawson, MO. We had thunderstorms all morning but finally the convection lifted off to the northeast about noon...by 12:30pm the sun started breaking out and that area just southeast of St. Joseph actually got to see all of totality with a fairly clear sky.


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#49 APshooter

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 06:18 PM

Valley Park, MO was partly cloudy all day. High, thin clouds zoomed high overhead while puffy clouds formed all around us. The clouds seemed to part before totality and we had a virtually perfect blue sky. Clouds came in heavy after the eclipse, but I only lost a few shots to C4 due to clouds.
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#50 ksgal

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 09:06 AM

 

It's my understanding it started cloudy in Alliance, but the clouds parted for the totality show, so I could have stayed put. 

I was in Alliance and it was a nail-biter. Clear when we drove in, right about C1. But there was a brisk north wind and scattered clouds started passing over, occasionally completely blocking the sun for a few seconds. A few minutes before totality, a real monster drifted in. This was the view with 5 minutes to go until showtime:

 

 

 

BUT that big cloud kept on moving. Here's the Diamond Ring just before C2:

 

 
 
And then those last wisps of cloud moved on and it was perfectly clear for all of totality. I don't remember any clouds in the whole second half of the eclipse, either. So we were all very happy - we got a great view of totality, and in retrospect the big cloud added a bit of additional suspense. It was easy to be happy afterwards since things had gone well. If that cloud had come by even a couple of minutes later, it would have been pretty frustrating.

 

Wow, now I'm glad I moved to Humingford.. this would have made me very stressed!  Thank you for the update!


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