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Did anyone see Regulus?

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#51 vickiestar

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 11:28 AM

One question I have is that some images show it as a point (which I understand), but when the resolution is better, some images show it as a blob, or an ovoid.

 

In the images I got (link to flickr images are in post #45 above), when I zoom in, Regulus appears as an ovoid, but even more so, it is brighter on one side than the other.

 

Does anyone know if this is due to Regulus being composed of more than one star? At best resolution, has anyone been able to discern one or more of the independent stars in Regulus?

 

I've been travelling, but when I have time, I will zoom into one of my images, and post an image of it (Regulus alone) on this forum. But the slight "ovoid" shape can still be easily discerned in what I already posted to Flickr.

 

(btw, this ovoid shape confused me for several daysconfused1.gif  as I thought this body was a planet, and was confused because I did not think that a 300mm lens could pick up a planet's illuminated shape, nor could I understand why a planet would be more illuminated from a direction other than the sun).

 

Thanks for any advise on what I'm actually seeing.smile.gif 



#52 Lord Beowulf

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 07:07 PM

I thought I had seen Mercury but it must have been Regulus instead, after consulting Stellarium again.

Mercury is in such a thin crescent phase that it's highly unlikely anyone saw it.

 

Attached File  Capture.JPG   15.39KB   0 downloads

 

Beo



#53 Lord Beowulf

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 07:17 PM

One question I have is that some images show it as a point (which I understand), but when the resolution is better, some images show it as a blob, or an ovoid.

 

In the images I got (link to flickr images are in post #45 above), when I zoom in, Regulus appears as an ovoid, but even more so, it is brighter on one side than the other.

 

Does anyone know if this is due to Regulus being composed of more than one star? At best resolution, has anyone been able to discern one or more of the independent stars in Regulus?

 

I've been travelling, but when I have time, I will zoom into one of my images, and post an image of it (Regulus alone) on this forum. But the slight "ovoid" shape can still be easily discerned in what I already posted to Flickr.

 

(btw, this ovoid shape confused me for several daysconfused1.gif  as I thought this body was a planet, and was confused because I did not think that a 300mm lens could pick up a planet's illuminated shape, nor could I understand why a planet would be more illuminated from a direction other than the sun).

 

Thanks for any advise on what I'm actually seeing.smile.gif

I'd say that's just lens distortion at the corner of the field.  As shown in post 44, the only neighboring star is pretty far away from Regulus.

 

Attached File  Capture.JPG   20.29KB   1 downloads

 

Beo



#54 vickiestar

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 07:39 PM

I've learned that there were no "neighboring" stars near Regulus, but Regulus I believe is composed of more than one star.

 

I also believe that most telephoto lenses should not have distortion (they are "rectilinear"). But correct me if I'm wrong. Of course any lens or image can have low resolution at some magnification. But that is blurriness, and not altering a sphere shape into an ovoid shape. My suspicion is that since Regulus is a star-system, hi-res images may not show it as a perfect sphere, nor with a uninform brightness at all edges.



#55 bencloud

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 08:41 PM

Regulus. Now I know what to tell people. This is a still from a video.

 

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#56 Jeremy Perez

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 08:56 PM

One question I have is that some images show it as a point (which I understand), but when the resolution is better, some images show it as a blob, or an ovoid.

 

....

 

Thanks for any advise on what I'm actually seeing.smile.gif

I know in my case, Regulus appeared elongated in some shots because wind was vibrating my EQ mount. A couple exposures in between wind jostling showed it as a more solid dot. Longer exposures on tripods may also have picked up some trailing just from sky motion...



#57 vickiestar

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 02:42 PM

Here are some images of Regulus in the photos I have from the eclipse.

The main image is the eclipse (scaled down but not cropped) which shows the location of Regulus relative to the eclipsed sun. The other three insets are Regulus at the original image size (cropped from image and pasted here). The first two are during totality (one being the main image), and the third was during the partial eclipse.

gallery_279180_8138_8758.jpg

It's pretty easy to see that these images of Regulus show it as slightly ovoid in shape, and somewhat brighter at the SE corner. Since Regulus is obviously not being illuminated by the sun, I assume this represents the shape and image density of Regulus.

It's also fairly consistent from the three separate photos.

I'm not normally a star-gazer, so I don't have reference photos of Regulus at non-eclipse.

But if my assumptions that Regulus is slightly ovoid, and of varying brightness density are not correct, feel free to comment.

Btw, I have eight other images posted at Flickr, if anyone is interested (one image and can scroll to others):

 

https://www.flickr.c...03/36593251861/


Edited by vickiestar, 30 August 2017 - 02:45 PM.


#58 mkupadhya

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 03:20 PM

I don't remember seeing Regulus.  But I clearly remember seeing Venus on the right of the Sun and Sirius on the far right bottom close to the horizon (was very bight).  I was watching the eclipse from Jackson Hole, Wyoming.


Edited by mkupadhya, 30 August 2017 - 03:20 PM.


#59 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 04:39 PM

I sighted Regulus through my 15x70s.

 

Dave Mitsky



#60 mkupadhya

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 06:59 PM

Yes, although I don't recall seeing Regulus, after seeing this post, searched through my 900+ images and found it here in the attached eclipse shot.  Its to the left of the Sun.  To the left of Regulus, is Mercury.  Photo taken in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, on August 21, 2017, using my Pentax X-3, Sigma 135-400mm at 400mm and with a 1.4x Sigma tele-converter, ISO 200, 1/125th of a second, F4.5.

 

Attached File  IMGP1485.jpg   48.02KB   1 downloads

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Edited by mkupadhya, 31 August 2017 - 07:35 AM.


#61 Lord Beowulf

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 07:30 AM

Here are some images of Regulus in the photos I have from the eclipse.

The main image is the eclipse (scaled down but not cropped) which shows the location of Regulus relative to the eclipsed sun. The other three insets are Regulus at the original image size (cropped from image and pasted here). The first two are during totality (one being the main image), and the third was during the partial eclipse.

gallery_279180_8138_8758.jpg

It's pretty easy to see that these images of Regulus show it as slightly ovoid in shape, and somewhat brighter at the SE corner. Since Regulus is obviously not being illuminated by the sun, I assume this represents the shape and image density of Regulus.

It's also fairly consistent from the three separate photos.

I'm not normally a star-gazer, so I don't have reference photos of Regulus at non-eclipse.

But if my assumptions that Regulus is slightly ovoid, and of varying brightness density are not correct, feel free to comment.

Btw, I have eight other images posted at Flickr, if anyone is interested (one image and can scroll to others):

 

https://www.flickr.c...03/36593251861/

Anything that shows a star (other than our own) as more than a point is due to an optical problem, either due to atmospheric effects, vibration, focus, or other distortions.  The teardrop shape you have looks like a common edge of field distortion, especially when slightly out of focus.

 

Beo


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#62 vickiestar

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 12:12 PM

 

Here are some images of Regulus in the photos I have from the eclipse.

The main image is the eclipse (scaled down but not cropped) which shows the location of Regulus relative to the eclipsed sun. The other three insets are Regulus at the original image size (cropped from image and pasted here). The first two are during totality (one being the main image), and the third was during the partial eclipse.

gallery_279180_8138_8758.jpg

It's pretty easy to see that these images of Regulus show it as slightly ovoid in shape, and somewhat brighter at the SE corner. Since Regulus is obviously not being illuminated by the sun, I assume this represents the shape and image density of Regulus.

It's also fairly consistent from the three separate photos.

I'm not normally a star-gazer, so I don't have reference photos of Regulus at non-eclipse.

But if my assumptions that Regulus is slightly ovoid, and of varying brightness density are not correct, feel free to comment.

Btw, I have eight other images posted at Flickr, if anyone is interested (one image and can scroll to others):

 

https://www.flickr.c...03/36593251861/

Anything that shows a star (other than our own) as more than a point is due to an optical problem, either due to atmospheric effects, vibration, focus, or other distortions.  The teardrop shape you have looks like a common edge of field distortion, especially when slightly out of focus.

 

Beo

 

Thanks Beo, but I'm still not 100% convinced. Regulus isn't a single star. According to Wikipedia, it is a "multiple star system composed of four stars that are organized into two pairs". To me it seems that since each star produces its own light, it isn't an absolute conclusion that images will always render to a single point. 

I can "cut" Regulus out of the photo and place it at the edge of the eclipse. The resolution at the edge of the eclipse is sharp in comparison to the "blob" of Regulus. I suppose that this can still be caused by the nature of photographing an eclipse.

But to me it's still an open question, mainly because your statement will surely be correct for individual stars, but not necessarily for star-systems. In the meantime, thanks for your reply.smile.gif



#63 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 01:39 PM

http://earthsky.org/...ts-bright-stars

 

http://www.nakedeyep...clipse-2017.htm

 

http://www.astropix....245530055781418 (a fantastic HDR image by Jerry Lodriguss)

 

Dave Mitsky



#64 REC

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 02:15 PM

One question I have is that some images show it as a point (which I understand), but when the resolution is better, some images show it as a blob, or an ovoid.

 

In the images I got (link to flickr images are in post #45 above), when I zoom in, Regulus appears as an ovoid, but even more so, it is brighter on one side than the other.

 

Does anyone know if this is due to Regulus being composed of more than one star? At best resolution, has anyone been able to discern one or more of the independent stars in Regulus?

 

I've been travelling, but when I have time, I will zoom into one of my images, and post an image of it (Regulus alone) on this forum. But the slight "ovoid" shape can still be easily discerned in what I already posted to Flickr.

 

(btw, this ovoid shape confused me for several daysconfused1.gif  as I thought this body was a planet, and was confused because I did not think that a 300mm lens could pick up a planet's illuminated shape, nor could I understand why a planet would be more illuminated from a direction other than the sun).

 

Thanks for any advise on what I'm actually seeing.smile.gif

Ya know, before I even read further down this post for other reply's, I had this thought. I remember seeing Regulas to the left of the sun in my 9x63 bino's and at first it looked like a round star that was out of focus. I was playing with the focus control out of instinct to try and get it pin point sharp like any other star. I figured that star if I had that in tight focus, then the view of the eclipse was as sharp as it was going to be? I gave up on it after a few seconds and the just looked at the eclipse. Now I'm going to scroll down and see the rest of the reply's



#65 REC

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 02:18 PM

Here are some images of Regulus in the photos I have from the eclipse.

The main image is the eclipse (scaled down but not cropped) which shows the location of Regulus relative to the eclipsed sun. The other three insets are Regulus at the original image size (cropped from image and pasted here). The first two are during totality (one being the main image), and the third was during the partial eclipse.

gallery_279180_8138_8758.jpg

It's pretty easy to see that these images of Regulus show it as slightly ovoid in shape, and somewhat brighter at the SE corner. Since Regulus is obviously not being illuminated by the sun, I assume this represents the shape and image density of Regulus.

It's also fairly consistent from the three separate photos.

I'm not normally a star-gazer, so I don't have reference photos of Regulus at non-eclipse.

But if my assumptions that Regulus is slightly ovoid, and of varying brightness density are not correct, feel free to comment.

Btw, I have eight other images posted at Flickr, if anyone is interested (one image and can scroll to others):

 

https://www.flickr.c...03/36593251861/

Those images of Regulas look like coma at first glance?



#66 REC

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 02:20 PM

Jerry's HDR image has to be the "creme de la creme" of all I have seen so far!



#67 Lord Beowulf

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 05:29 PM

Thanks Beo, but I'm still not 100% convinced. Regulus isn't a single star. According to Wikipedia, it is a "multiple star system composed of four stars that are organized into two pairs". To me it seems that since each star produces its own light, it isn't an absolute conclusion that images will always render to a single point. 

 

 

 

 

I can "cut" Regulus out of the photo and place it at the edge of the eclipse. The resolution at the edge of the eclipse is sharp in comparison to the "blob" of Regulus. I suppose that this can still be caused by the nature of photographing an eclipse.

But to me it's still an open question, mainly because your statement will surely be correct for individual stars, but not necessarily for star-systems. In the meantime, thanks for your reply.smile.gif

 

 

There's a shot of Regulus on Wikipedia that looks pretty small and round to me!  grin.gif

 

That said, I found this article which indicates that Regulus is in fact somewhat oblate due to its spin.  However, I seriously doubt you'd detect that even with a much higher magnification.  Certainly not in a field large enough to have captured it and the eclipse.  The dimensions are just over a milliarcsecond.  Of course if it was (MUCH) closer to the Sun, maybe it's gravitational lensing!  lol.gif

 

Beo


Edited by Lord Beowulf, 31 August 2017 - 05:35 PM.


#68 vickiestar

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 06:13 PM

Ok, my photo of Regulus is blurry.frown.gif

 

And someone told me the rainbow in another image (link below) is probably a lens phenomenon.frown.gif

 

https://www.flickr.c...03/36593251861/

 

So I'm 0 for 2.mad.gif

 

But the eclipse was pretty cool!smile.gif



#69 vickiestar

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 06:41 AM

Regulus is also clearly visible in this video (not mine):

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=mBkA9Xlgn9A

 

It was filmed (nowadays "videographed") from the same place I took my photos. It is a rather good video for several reasons; one being that the clouds parted exactly at the right time to see the eclipse. Also the noise from the crowd is amazing.waytogo.gif

 

Regulus becomes clearly visible at totality (2:26), and can be seen flickering caused by much lighter clouds still in the sky.smile.gif



#70 Lord Beowulf

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 12:40 AM

Here's my processed shot of it.  I'll probably take one more pass at the color on this one.

 

4494.jpg link31.png

 

Beo


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#71 Lord Beowulf

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 07:59 AM

This version has much more artificial coloring trying to reduce the banding, especially when reduced, but I can't say it really looks that much better.

 

4495.jpg link31.png

 

Beo



#72 SeymoreStars

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 08:05 AM

Regulus was clearly visible from Glendo WY, we had clear blue (black) skies.



#73 kbev

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 05:59 AM

I remember briefly seeing Regulus in my 10x50 binoculars as I was scanning the corona.  I don't recall seeing it naked eye but I suffer from multi-axis astigmatism (from RK surgery back in the 90's) which caused the corona to double and washed out lots of fine detail.  Venus was far enough away that I had no problem seeing it. 



#74 emh52

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:50 PM

New composite processing, stacking a white light solar image with HDR of the corona with blue Regulus in the frame to recreate the Sun, its corona, and one of the distant stars in a single image.

 

full resolution : https://flic.kr/p/XmShFE

 

Equipment used was a Vixen VSD telescope, a Nikon D500 camera location was in eastern Idaho.

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