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Great Quasars: 12 Hyperluminous Deep AGNs for big scopes

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#1 quazy4quasars

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 04:58 PM

These place among the brightest known sources in the universe.  Most will require a 12" -16" scope.
-gleaned from Veron-Cetty, Millquas(E. flesch) SDSS-III  Hamburg QSO  and other catalogs.

           APM08279+5255       z=3.91  V =~16.5        12.0 Gly   -  Difficult field, rather faint, redish, resolves in 25"  Lensed
           B2 1422+231             z=3.62  V = 15.8         11.8 Gly   -  Very easy field, well resolved as quasi-pointlike,  Lensed.
           SBS1425+606            z+3.16  V  = 15.8         11.4 Gly   -   Easy field,  Extreme luminosity. Can be seen most of year NH.
           HS1946+769              z=3.02   V =~15.9       11.1 Gly   -    Difficult field, Extremely luminous.   Circumpolar at 77.1 N
           HS1603+3820            z=2.51   V (est)=15.5  10.6 Gly    -   Difficult field, Possibly in outburst. visible in 12-14"
           PG1247+267             z=2.04   V = 15.5          10.1 Gly   -   Very easy field,  1deg. S of 30 comae.  visible in 12-14"
           QSO B1225-1116      z=1.98    V (est) =15.6  10.0 Gly   -  Difficult field, equatorial.  (southern dec robs it of .3-.5  mag from 40 N.)
           PG1634+706             z=1.337  V = 14.7          8.9 Gly    -  Easy field,  Possible in 8" on up - can be seen most of the year.
           QSO B1718+481       z=1.08    V = 14.6          7.6 Gly    -  Easy field.  Good for 8"   Nearest of the Great Quasars,   N of M92
           SDSS1521+5202       z=2.21    V = 15.7          10.4 Gly  -  Easy field.  X-ray weak brightest from SDSS dr7Q 
           HS1549+1919            z=2.84    V = 15.8           11.0 Gly -  Easy field   Extremely luminous, non lensed; dense protocluster core

*NEW* 01 47 09 +46 30 37   z=2.38    V = 14.9!!!       10.5 Gly  -  BRIGHT quadruple lens, recent discovery:  "Andromeda's Parachute"

 

 Check SIMBAD, NED or HEASARC for coordinates
WIKISKY (Skymap.org) is excellent for generating finding charts

Happy Hunting.


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#2 quazy4quasars

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 12:07 PM

  There are a few more QSOs that could be added to this list,  which was, with one exception, restricted to those QSOs with published  V brighter than 16.0,  and with brightness at or very near the highest observed for a given or greater z,  including lensed sources-  in short they would be just about the easiest to detect for their red-shift distance or beyond.

 

  There are z~3 QSOs in the list that appear slightly brighter than their published V mags would indicate, owing to a flux peak blueward of the V passband, but within a couple hundred nm of the scotopic sensitivity peak, or right on top of it.  Also, even hyperlumoinous QSOs are variable within a fraction of a magnitude or so, and their light-curves are not well constrained, so you may be granted a slight flux bonus if you happen to catch them near peak.  Here are some additional sources that I think merit a mention:

 

S5 0014+813      z~3.36     V~16.5       SMBH Possibly the largest known, and a Blazar..  Try to catch it in outburst!

HS 0747+471     z~3.20      V~16.4*     scotopic mag about 15.8-16.0 due to VERY strong, phased lya/NV emission feature (the peak of the "big blue bump"), similar to that of SBS 1425+606

CSO 38              z~2.62     V~16.0       

HS 1103+6416   z~2.23       V~15.8

HS 1700+6416   z~2.72       V~16.1

HS 1626+6433   z~2.30       V~15.8

 

Happy Hunting.


Edited by quazy4quasars, 26 August 2019 - 06:22 PM.

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#3 Arcticpaddler

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 04:36 PM

I think there are 6-8 quasars that are visible with my humble, 8-inch scope.  I've viewed one so far.  I can see objects down to mag 14.5, but 15 to 16 is a tall order... LOL.



#4 quazy4quasars

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 11:38 AM

  At long last, after a midnight moon-set, I observed S5 0014+813 (V~16.5, z~3.36)  in Cepheus:  It is the most distant non-lensed QSO I have ever seen; one of only a couple-few z>3 QSOs bright enough to be seen even in 16" and larger amateur instruments.  The view in my 25" was at 450x, using a 9mm nagler and 2x Stellarvue Barlowe lens.

     

  Although hampered by a difficult field as well as by this source being too far North for a near-zenithal view, It was -rather surprisingly- not difficult in my 25" in decent-good seeing; in spite of only moderate transparency and less-than-dark-site limiting magnitude. A nearby 17.0 mag star was intermittently direct-visible and another at V~17.7 was not definite at any time, only an occasional hint of "something there" in averted vision.  The QSO itself has a decent lyman alpha/NV peak around 525-535 nm which no doubt helps with scotopic visibility, nicely compensating for moderate lyman-forest absorbtion blueward of 520 nm.

 

  This QSO's light has been en route to Earth for fully 12 Billion years, its current distance is estimated at well over 22 Billion Light years.  We see it shining from within a much smaller and younger universe; the still-early morning of time; powered by a 40 Billion Solar mass SMBH, perhaps the largest in the early universe, with a Schwarzchild radius about 400 times the diameter of our Solar System.  These things are phenomenal in all ways; they really take one out of oneself.  At some point,  billions of years ago, The SMBH engine ran short of fuel and the light faded, but we still see it shining from this oh-so-remote distance, in spite of well over Six magnitudes of cosmological surface-brightness dimming (NED) due to the Hubble expansion of space-time.

 

  For any source, lensed or not- to be optically visible at such a distance, it must -have been- hyper-prodigiously luminous; and so extremely hot that the far UV emission may be seen by our eyes -after being stretched to over four times its original wavelength, of course.  The actual optical emission of the QSO in the rest frame, has now also been stretched to more than fourfold to become ~2 micron infrared radiation. So, these deep, hyperluminous QSOs - The Great Quasars- are really illusory -even when they are NOT lensed: Billions of years gone now, and a present marvel in the eyepiece, looking like just another very faint star..

 

  Good day to you.


Edited by quazy4quasars, 06 September 2019 - 09:53 PM.

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