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Did anyone actuallt see the Diamond Ring or did you pull away?

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#1 REC

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 11:09 AM

I was looking at the eclipse with my 9x63 bino's and had just a wonderful view of the corona. Just as one side of the sun was just staring to get brighter, I knew that the suns rays where only a few seconds from breaking out and could possible cause eye damage. Maybe it was just at the beginning of Bailey's Beads, but then I pulled my head away. Maybe I could have stayed for another second or so, but are leader was yelling, "glasses on".

 

So wondering if anyone did see it for a very brief moment?

 

I'm starting to suffer post eclipse trauma.....I want to go back to Monday.frown.gif



#2 bierbelly

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 11:22 AM

I glanced at it visually for a fraction of a second



#3 xiando

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 11:23 AM

I saw it by naked eye. I'm one of those dumb folk who has spent his life looking at the sun directly on occasion. It was no big thing for me (the looking not the ring, which was beautiful) , although to be responsible, I don't encourage anyone else doing as I've done (any more than I'd recommend that others try riding a bicycle across a log over a 30 foot ravine, in which I broke a few things when the bark peeled and me and my bike took a short trip back to earth and learned a painful lesson about neato and its cost wink.gif )

 

(Hopkinsville KY, btw)


Edited by xiando, 25 August 2017 - 11:25 AM.

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#4 REC

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 11:24 AM

I glanced at it visually for a fraction of a second

Good for you! Where did you go?



#5 bierbelly

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 11:25 AM

 

I glanced at it visually for a fraction of a second

Good for you! Where did you go?

 

Ended up in Orangeburg, SC.  Turned out to be a great location.


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#6 dghundt

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 11:50 AM

I glanced at it unaided visually for a brief moment after totality.

I imagine most causal observers did this and naturally looked away once it flashed bright like it does.



#7 Tim in GA

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 12:09 PM

Yep, I briefly looked at it before & after totality. The next morning when we finally arrived home it was still dark out and I noticed my night vision wasn't as good. When I closed my eyes there was definitely a bluish glow going on. It went away by the next night.


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#8 kornfeld

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 12:27 PM

I would be willing to bet that a massively overwhelming majority looked at it at the end of totality, at least briefly. Most people probably didn't have the luck of having a knowledgeable person within earshot that had a timer running.  

 

It's of course good to be careful, but I have never seen a more risk-averse group of people than astronomers. My other hobby is around cars, and there are all sorts of relatively mundane things you can do with cars that could literally kill people (incorrectly installing brakes, messing with suspension and/or steering systems, adding huge amounts of power to otherwise stock cars, etc).  In terms of potential negative outcomes, astronomy (including solar astronomy) has got to be one of the least risky activities out there.

 

So in case you couldn't tell....yeah, of course I looked.  It was beautiful. smile.gif


Edited by kornfeld, 25 August 2017 - 12:36 PM.

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#9 StarmanDan

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 01:12 PM

I took a glance once I was no longer able to see the crescent sun in the solar glasses at second contact.  Saw it again at 3rd contact but very briefly before putting my glasses back on.  It was like watching a supernova go off.


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#10 RussL

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 02:12 PM

I glanced at it after seeing the Beads in 10x50s. Just a glance. Awesome. Made me think as if seeing a super nova from Earth. The whole affair was just astonishing.
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#11 Tom M

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 02:32 PM

I glanced at it after seeing the Beads in 10x50s. Just a glance. Awesome. Made me think as if seeing a super nova from Earth. The whole affair was just astonishing.

Same here in 15x42 IS binoculars @ C3. I also had a timer running so I knew it was happening.


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#12 kbev

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 03:06 PM

I saw it in my binoculars just at 3rd contact and yelled out just before to let everyone know it was coming. Between the corona, prominences and the first bit of photosphere peeking thru it was just amazing!

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#13 FlorinAndrei

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 03:07 PM

Maybe I could have stayed for another second or so, but are leader was yelling, "glasses on".

Well, regarding all that yelling - there's good safety practices, and then there's too much coddling.

 

A brief glance at the photosphere does not damage the retina. If that were so, going outside when the Sun is up in the sky would be the most dangerous thing you could do, as far as vision is concerned, because you involuntarily see the Sun every time you look up.

 

What damages the retina is persistent staring at the photosphere without filters - in other words, when you look at it persistently, with a fixed stare, for more than a few seconds, especially when you're holding the Sun in the center of your vision. That indeed is dangerous.

 

The Diamond Ring is fine to watch - for a second or two. Take one look at it, then look away and put the glasses on. That's it, and you'll be fine. Now if you linger, that's when all the trouble begins.

 

I've seen it, if ever so briefly, just after totality ended.


Edited by FlorinAndrei, 25 August 2017 - 05:26 PM.

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#14 AUricle

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 04:18 PM

Our group of 20 was getting almost totally skunked by clouds during totality except for a brief 6-7 sec. period right at mid-totality. Then just before C3, the cloud broke again, and I know everyone was still naked eye viewing.

So we all caught a very brief, 1-2 second view of the DR.

I'll tell you,.....it was the most intense whitest light I've ever seen. Just spectacular and breathtaking. Shouts and gasps all around.


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#15 GamesForOne

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 05:17 PM

I was one of those over-cautious types because nobody seemed to want to go on record as to whether looking at the beads and diamond ring was safe. Later I found an article that describes how only about 1/2 of persons that said they stared at the Sun for more than 18 seconds during a 1999 eclipse suffered lingering symptoms of, or observable, retinal damage.

 

I'd say a glance of a couple of seconds or so was probably safe, but I didn't chance it. I feel left out after viewing all the crowd videos where everyone goes "ooh" and "aah" when the diamond ring pops.

 

Reading the study did make me feel better about the fact my 4 year old son looked up for about 2-3 seconds before I saw him and covered his eyes. (I asked my wife to watch our young twins for this and I ended up having to watch out for them.) Maybe he'll have a memory that I won't.  wink.gif

 

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#16 prichardson

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 05:28 PM

Yes, I looked. I glanced at my phone saw 2 minutes had passed, totality was for 2 minutes 11 seconds at Ft. Laramie NHS, so got ready.  Probably looked too long.  Unbelievable.  Still get emotional thinking about it.  Very moving experience.  I think I got away with intact retinas, but who knows.

 

I was talking with another person there about it afterward, and he must have looked too.  All he could say was "That Diamond Ring!"

 

Best



#17 mogur

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 05:51 PM

I was using my 10x50's at the end of totality. I saw what I thought was a big prominence but then I realized it was the beads and I quickly put the binos down and turned away. I was counting "one thousand one, one thousand two, etc. to time the eclipse but I never got past 120. I guess I was counting to slow. That was the fastest 2.5 minutes I ever experienced!


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#18 kfiscus

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 06:23 PM

Saw both diamond rings because I was filter-free and instrument-free.  I looked away from the sun and got the countdown timer ready for our 2 min 37 sec of totality.  This was my third total so I got ready for both.  I was on the PA system for about 400 people and was in charge of telling them when to remove their glasses and filters.  I personally got to see about 5-6 seconds naked-eye combined (almost typed "total") of the two diamonds.


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#19 airbleeder

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 06:37 PM

I was looking at the eclipse with my 9x63 bino's and had just a wonderful view of the corona. Just as one side of the sun was just staring to get brighter, I knew that the suns rays where only a few seconds from breaking out and could possible cause eye damage. Maybe it was just at the beginning of Bailey's Beads, but then I pulled my head away. Maybe I could have stayed for another second or so, but are leader was yelling, "glasses on".

 

So wondering if anyone did see it for a very brief moment?

 

I'm starting to suffer post eclipse trauma.....I want to go back to Monday.frown.gif

   I viewed it naked eye near Clarkesville, GA until it was too bright. A beautiful site indeed.


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#20 DSObserver2000

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 07:00 PM

Once it started to get super bright again I pulled away. I saw Baily's Beads and diamond ring but right after diamond ring started I had to pull away. Can't wait for 2024!grin.gif


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#21 Solnze

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 08:57 PM

I saw both the first and the second, and took a quick, bad, overexposed  shot looking into my viewfinder https://m.youtube.co...h?v=I8DISrOBGC0 it is the insert in the last frame of this video. It is quite amazing to see still eclipsed sun with brilliant ring.



#22 Americal

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 09:40 PM

Got it at third contact north of John Day, OR.  Most of my party picked it up, probably a little safer at third.  Truly spectacular.  When I figure how to paste it in I will.

 

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#23 bunyon

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 10:12 PM

Yes, I watched it for a second or two at third contact.  It was hard to time it right at second.  It seemed like I watched the ring at C3 for quite a while but it couldn't have been more than a second or two.

 

Totality seemed timeless.  It went fast but at times it felt like the world was standing still.


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#24 kbev

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 01:14 AM



I'll tell you,.....it was the most intense whitest light I've ever seen. Just spectacular and breathtaking. Shouts and gasps all around.

That was something I noticed also - that first tiny bit of photosphere was just so pure and white with the red/pink prominences around it. It was breathtaking!


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#25 JimMo

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 06:57 AM

I was just watching visually but had my camera around my neck and took a few snapshots. None came out too good, but I did get the diamond ring, albeit a little overexposed.

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