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Did anyone actuallt see the Diamond Ring or did you pull away?

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#26 PNWkarma

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 07:48 AM

We were lucky and saw the diamond ring on the way in and out. I wasn't ready for how quick it appeared on the way in and we were so busy looking at it that I didn't get an image. The nice thing about looking at it on the way in is that as soon as we realized it was there and small enough, we removed our glasses and lenses and really just looked with naked eyes at the last part which of course faded very quickly so none of us felt like it was dangerous light exposure.

 

However, the ring on the way out provided the temptation to keep watching the ring for too long as it was exiting the ring stage and was obviously too bright as it forced you to look away.  Now that was too much!

 

i did get some images on the way out, not great, but I think they'll be ok once I post process. Here's one of the frames:

Diamond Ring

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#27 Alvan Clark

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 09:30 AM

I'm not sure why people wouldn't see it. It's the most breathtaking part of the eclipse. It may be a little harder to see the first one (I did). The second one is easy. Just keep looking. When the sun becomes too bright, look away.

 

The only deep emotional reaction I got to the eclipse was the two diamond rings. It's so beautiful you want to cry.

 

It only lasts a second or two. If that would make you go blind, everyone would be. Everyone occasionally glances at the sun for all kinds of reasons.



#28 REC

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 09:47 AM

I'm not sure why people wouldn't see it. It's the most breathtaking part of the eclipse. It may be a little harder to see the first one (I did). The second one is easy. Just keep looking. When the sun becomes too bright, look away.

 

The only deep emotional reaction I got to the eclipse was the two diamond rings. It's so beautiful you want to cry.

 

It only lasts a second or two. If that would make you go blind, everyone would be. Everyone occasionally glances at the sun for all kinds of reasons.

Sure wish I thought this way at the moment, only a second more or two! But, that first glance at the corona, just after C2 was just awesome. I was looking through my 9x63 and pointing to the sun to find it and then bang, there it was in all it's glory!

 

Sure nice to hear from all of you about your experience. smile.gif



#29 HaleBopper

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 10:10 AM

I had a look at the first diamond ring. Just before totality, I looked up in time to see the thin solar crescent disappear before the diamond ring effect. Amazing site, and I'm glad I witnessed it. 



#30 MarioJumanji

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 02:02 PM

I didn't get to see more than a glimpse of the diamond ring. I had my kids with me and made them put their glasses back on as soon as I saw it. I felt bad for some other kids near by though, as I heard their dad freaking out on them during the totality to put their glasses back on before they burned their retinas out. I wanted to say something, but it would have ruined my moment to get in an argument with a stranger during the eclipse.

#31 charotarguy

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 07:12 AM

Due to the clouds a lot of people around me saw the diamond ring (C3) naked eyes up until the cloud moved away and the light came back. My daughter by mistake had the binoculars at her eyes (I was taking images by the scope), I heard "Oh wow", literally had to run to get the binos away from her. The cool thing was the cloud only covered the whole sun expect the diamond right part.



#32 thesungazer

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 08:56 AM

I posted in another thread:

 

The second diamond ring was the most beautiful natural phenomena I've experienced in all my long years. It felt like the sun was 1000 feet in front of me and a crystal white laser went right through my eyes.

I'd go through all the effort of getting to the next eclipse just to experience that one thing again.

 

Greg


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#33 17.5Dob

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 01:56 PM

I'm not sure I "saw" the first one, everything was happening so fast at that point, but there is no doubt I saw the second one at C3. It was the highlight of the entire experience. It was the purest, brightest light I've ever seen, suddenly erupting from the corona. No words can describe it. I was in tears, and it took several minutes to even try to speak to my viewing neighbors.


Edited by 17.5Dob, 27 August 2017 - 01:58 PM.

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#34 rainycityastro

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 03:43 PM

I was fortunate to see the diamond ring as well both in and out. I fortunately had help from Solar Eclipse Maestro that told me to take filters off and when I did that, I took my eclipse glasses off as well.

 

I also managed to photograph the diamond ring with 2 different cameras.



#35 ismosi

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 10:54 PM

I saw the second diamond ring; I may have missed the first one removing the filter from my telescope. When the second appeared I announced 'Diamond Ring', saw it for a second or two, and then looked away, making sure to announce to the people around me to put eye protection on again.

 

It was spectacularly beautiful. Like the corona, photos don't do it justice.



#36 caveman_astronomer

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 05:25 AM

I was looking at the eclipse with my 9x63 bino's and had just a wonderful view of the corona. Just as one side of the sun was just staring to get brighter, I knew that the suns rays where only a few seconds from breaking out and could possible cause eye damage. Maybe it was just at the beginning of Bailey's Beads, but then I pulled my head away. Maybe I could have stayed for another second or so, but are leader was yelling, "glasses on".

 

So wondering if anyone did see it for a very brief moment?

 

I'm starting to suffer post eclipse trauma.....I want to go back to Monday.frown.gif

https://www.youtube....h?v=jo1cyl0QbWo



#37 caveman_astronomer

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 05:26 AM

Folks, don't try this.

 

 



#38 martini man

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 08:16 AM

Saw the Diamond Ring ever so briefly at C3. Beautiful!



#39 Ed Jones

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 08:50 AM

I as in Spring City Tenn. I saw both but missed shooting second contact. On C3 I think I got lucky. I forgot that you can't see a camera's liquid crystal display in the dark, dah. I could only tell I was in manual or auto so I just shot blind. I still got some great shots.

Attached Files


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#40 REC

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 09:13 AM

 

I was looking at the eclipse with my 9x63 bino's and had just a wonderful view of the corona. Just as one side of the sun was just staring to get brighter, I knew that the suns rays where only a few seconds from breaking out and could possible cause eye damage. Maybe it was just at the beginning of Bailey's Beads, but then I pulled my head away. Maybe I could have stayed for another second or so, but are leader was yelling, "glasses on".

 

So wondering if anyone did see it for a very brief moment?

 

I'm starting to suffer post eclipse trauma.....I want to go back to Monday.frown.gif

https://www.youtube....h?v=jo1cyl0QbWo

 

????



#41 caveman_astronomer

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 09:40 AM

 

 

I was looking at the eclipse with my 9x63 bino's and had just a wonderful view of the corona. Just as one side of the sun was just staring to get brighter, I knew that the suns rays where only a few seconds from breaking out and could possible cause eye damage. Maybe it was just at the beginning of Bailey's Beads, but then I pulled my head away. Maybe I could have stayed for another second or so, but are leader was yelling, "glasses on".

 

So wondering if anyone did see it for a very brief moment?

 

I'm starting to suffer post eclipse trauma.....I want to go back to Monday.frown.gif

https://www.youtube....h?v=jo1cyl0QbWo

 

????

 

From the lyrics at about 35 seconds:

 

"Back it up and do it again

"From the middle to the top to the end...

"Back to the middle to the front to the end..



#42 bierbelly

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 10:15 AM

I posted in another thread:

 

The second diamond ring was the most beautiful natural phenomena I've experienced in all my long years. It felt like the sun was 1000 feet in front of me and a crystal white laser went right through my eyes.

I'd go through all the effort of getting to the next eclipse just to experience that one thing again.

 

Greg

I'd have to agree.  There was something different about the 2nd diamond ring.  It was incredible.


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#43 Special Ed

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 10:29 AM

I saw the eclipse in the Cherokee National Forest in East Tennessee and saw the DR at 2nd and 3rd contact for maybe a second.  I wasn't too worried about looking at the Sun for too long because one reflexively looks away when the Sun is too bright because it hurts.  I've accidentally glanced at the Sun when trying to find it to observe in WL and have seen color lights for a few minutes-that didn't happen to me after the eclipse.

 

My first total eclipse and the best astronomical event I've ever witnessed.


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#44 FirstSight

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 11:30 AM

Saw the eclipse at a site in the coastal marshes of SC that thereby had wide-open unobstructed "big sky" horizons of the kind usually found only in the western US.  (Santee Coastal refuge just N or McClellanville, SC).  Wide-open enough that even during maximum eclipse, we could easily see the simultaneous 180-degree opposite bands of twilight along the far distant horizon, at the respective N and S edges of the band of totality, ironically aided by the partly cloudy conditions (our location was fortunately in a huge cloud-free sucker-hole).  And as the end of totality approached, we could see the polar opposite bands of twilight growing closer to us, eventually including the back edge of the lunar shadow approaching us.  So no timer was needed in our location to anticipate the arrival of the "diamond ring" at the end of totality.  

 

The only previous total eclipse I've seen back in 1970 was in a sandy farmyard, which facilitated seeing the "shadow bands" racing across the ground just as totality was imminent, and just as it ended.  That was one thing our coastal marsh / water-side site didn't show (just enough wind to ripple the water and break up the necessary mirror-like reflectivity) - unfortunately, though our site was only a mile or so as the crow flies from the ocean beachfront, most of the coastal band of totality in SC was in a long stretch of the Cape Romain NWR, inaccessible except by boat.  The shadow bands are supposedly especially prominent on a sandy beach-front.  But hey, in every other respect, we hit the jackpot for a perfect site to witness the 2017 eclipse - the same wind that rippled the water also kept the mosquitoes away (the coastal marshlands are very buggy).  And none of the alligators which inhabit the brackish waterways decided to inconveniently sun themselves on the boat launch/fishing pier berm we were located on.

 

While the "diamond ring" effect was indeed spectacular, the associated "Bailey's beads" phenomenon was much less distinctly evident in 2017 compared to 1970, or for that matter the near-total annular eclipse I witnessed back in 1984.  Oh, well- I'm no complaining a bit, we couldn't have asked for a better site / better view of the 2017 event, and I have no doubt the memory of everyone at our site is indelibly etched with the spectacle, just as the 1970 event is still as vivid in my mind as if it happened yesterday.


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#45 bierbelly

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 12:45 PM

Saw the eclipse at a site in the coastal marshes of SC that thereby had wide-open unobstructed "big sky" horizons of the kind usually found only in the western US.  (Santee Coastal refuge just N or McClellanville, SC).  Wide-open enough that even during maximum eclipse, we could easily see the simultaneous 180-degree opposite bands of twilight along the far distant horizon, at the respective N and S edges of the band of totality, ironically aided by the partly cloudy conditions (our location was fortunately in a huge cloud-free sucker-hole).  And as the end of totality approached, we could see the polar opposite bands of twilight growing closer to us, eventually including the back edge of the lunar shadow approaching us.  So no timer was needed in our location to anticipate the arrival of the "diamond ring" at the end of totality.  

 

The only previous total eclipse I've seen back in 1970 was in a sandy farmyard, which facilitated seeing the "shadow bands" racing across the ground just as totality was imminent, and just as it ended.  That was one thing our coastal marsh / water-side site didn't show (just enough wind to ripple the water and break up the necessary mirror-like reflectivity) - unfortunately, though our site was only a mile or so as the crow flies from the ocean beachfront, most of the coastal band of totality in SC was in a long stretch of the Cape Romain NWR, inaccessible except by boat.  The shadow bands are supposedly especially prominent on a sandy beach-front.  But hey, in every other respect, we hit the jackpot for a perfect site to witness the 2017 eclipse - the same wind that rippled the water also kept the mosquitoes away (the coastal marshlands are very buggy).  And none of the alligators which inhabit the brackish waterways decided to inconveniently sun themselves on the boat launch/fishing pier berm we were located on.

 

While the "diamond ring" effect was indeed spectacular, the associated "Bailey's beads" phenomenon was much less distinctly evident in 2017 compared to 1970, or for that matter the near-total annular eclipse I witnessed back in 1984.  Oh, well- I'm no complaining a bit, we couldn't have asked for a better site / better view of the 2017 event, and I have no doubt the memory of everyone at our site is indelibly etched with the spectacle, just as the 1970 event is still as vivid in my mind as if it happened yesterday.

I have to agree with you.  I saw the 1970 eclipse on Assateague Island near Chincoteague and saw both the shadow bands (we were on the shore) and Bailey's Beads.  Didn't really notice either this time.  But the 2nd diamond ring looked almost blue.


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#46 charotarguy

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 01:27 PM

 

Saw the eclipse at a site in the coastal marshes of SC that thereby had wide-open unobstructed "big sky" horizons of the kind usually found only in the western US.  (Santee Coastal refuge just N or McClellanville, SC).  Wide-open enough that even during maximum eclipse, we could easily see the simultaneous 180-degree opposite bands of twilight along the far distant horizon, at the respective N and S edges of the band of totality, ironically aided by the partly cloudy conditions (our location was fortunately in a huge cloud-free sucker-hole).  And as the end of totality approached, we could see the polar opposite bands of twilight growing closer to us, eventually including the back edge of the lunar shadow approaching us.  So no timer was needed in our location to anticipate the arrival of the "diamond ring" at the end of totality.  

 

The only previous total eclipse I've seen back in 1970 was in a sandy farmyard, which facilitated seeing the "shadow bands" racing across the ground just as totality was imminent, and just as it ended.  That was one thing our coastal marsh / water-side site didn't show (just enough wind to ripple the water and break up the necessary mirror-like reflectivity) - unfortunately, though our site was only a mile or so as the crow flies from the ocean beachfront, most of the coastal band of totality in SC was in a long stretch of the Cape Romain NWR, inaccessible except by boat.  The shadow bands are supposedly especially prominent on a sandy beach-front.  But hey, in every other respect, we hit the jackpot for a perfect site to witness the 2017 eclipse - the same wind that rippled the water also kept the mosquitoes away (the coastal marshlands are very buggy).  And none of the alligators which inhabit the brackish waterways decided to inconveniently sun themselves on the boat launch/fishing pier berm we were located on.

 

While the "diamond ring" effect was indeed spectacular, the associated "Bailey's beads" phenomenon was much less distinctly evident in 2017 compared to 1970, or for that matter the near-total annular eclipse I witnessed back in 1984.  Oh, well- I'm no complaining a bit, we couldn't have asked for a better site / better view of the 2017 event, and I have no doubt the memory of everyone at our site is indelibly etched with the spectacle, just as the 1970 event is still as vivid in my mind as if it happened yesterday.

I have to agree with you.  I saw the 1970 eclipse on Assateague Island near Chincoteague and saw both the shadow bands (we were on the shore) and Bailey's Beads.  Didn't really notice either this time.  But the 2nd diamond ring looked almost blue.

 

We went to the science center for kids at Carbondale Il and were told by the person who was presenting/hosting information related to solar eclipse that this year baily's beads will not be visible, something to do with the way moon was oriented, not sure if that was true or not but I was able to capture baily's beads on the video I took. I just remembered it when I read about baily's beads in the last two posts.



#47 Mad MikeE

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 09:16 AM

I was looking up / down / up... as C2 came up and I saw the last of the Sun fade away.

 

Noticed the corona showing up as that happened, then when the last of the Sun disappeared, it was like a great flower blooming from the moon.

 

I think I was looking @ C3 but I was so busy, I'm not sure if it is my memory or ...

Other than that there are no words...

 

Update - Got home and found a few worthwhile examples
 C2 going in!
Attached File  IMG_2320.jpg   38.57KB   3 downloads

 

 And the last bit before totality:

Attached File  IMG_2321.jpg   28.58KB   1 downloads

 

My son nagged me to put up the 'cool' post-C3 onelol.gif

Attached File  IMG_2411.jpg   47.22KB   1 downloads

 

 

Best part is NO extra processing (Though I would like to figure out how to remove the lens-flare...) smile.gif


Edited by Mad MikeE, 31 August 2017 - 06:40 PM.

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#48 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 11:00 AM

Here's a hand-held shot of the second diamond ring that I took with a Canon PowerShot SX720 HS camera.

 

Dave Mitsky

Attached Files


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#49 ed_turco

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 01:05 PM

I saw that sun pop out from behind the moon and watched for about one second.   Then I yelled, "EYES DOWN!"  for me and everyone else.

 

I would venture that it is insanity to view a diamond ring through binoculars.  Binocs have that famous light-gathering power that brings out the Milky Way so well.

 

Imagine what they might do to a Diamond Ring!

 

I don't want to find out.



#50 REC

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 02:35 PM

I saw that sun pop out from behind the moon and watched for about one second.   Then I yelled, "EYES DOWN!"  for me and everyone else.

 

I would venture that it is insanity to view a diamond ring through binoculars.  Binocs have that famous light-gathering power that brings out the Milky Way so well.

 

Imagine what they might do to a Diamond Ring!

 

I don't want to find out.

Good point, but I still have mixed emotions on it. I have a copy of the August Astronomy magazine that has 20 pages devoted to the eclipse. Not only how to best photograph it, but step by step instructions as how to observe it. I looked all over the place before frantically leaving my house for the trip and could not find it.....too many magazines all over. I wanted to review it the night before, so I wouldn't miss anything. Well, found it the other day and low and behold, there it was on my night stand underneath some other magazines.

 

Reading the last part of the observing guide, they said that looking at the last diamond ring with just the naked eye was ok, for about 3-4 seconds. Through a binocular, pull away at the first sight of the diamond ring? I did get a nice view of the pink chromoshere just as the DR it was going to come out.

 

Now, if I could just remember a nice view of the totality and corona in my minds eye......! A lot going on in those final minutes!




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