Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

NGC7009 has a twin?

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 steven_usa

steven_usa

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 957
  • Joined: 06 May 2014
  • Loc: Texas

Posted 10 September 2017 - 11:27 PM

I was imaging NGC7009 (Saturn Nebula) recently, which is characterized by a set of "ears" flanking the nebula (so close, that they ended up making the nebula resemble Saturn in the earlier years of its observations).  In reviewing my image, I noticed another "star" in the area that had this similar "flanked by ears" style.    I went to the DSS (Digital Sky Survey) to see if it was just a processing fluke on my part, and the DSS showed a consistent result.

 

 

So what do you think -- is this other object just a star that is coincidentally flanked by two others stars from our perspective?   Or is it a similar kind of nebula as NGC7009 (perhaps further away)?    Note, the presence of diffraction spikes doesn't necessarily mean the object is a star -- any bright object will produce this kind of diffraction spike effect with kind of SCT scope (that uses spider vanes to hold the secondary).

 

 

 

 

In J2000, NGC7009 is at
RA 21h 04m 11s
DEC -11:21:49

 

The object that looks similar to NGC7009 is at
RA 21h 05m 03s
DEC -11:25:01

 

 

get.jpg

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Untitled.jpg

Edited by steven_usa, 10 September 2017 - 11:50 PM.


#2 Rick J

Rick J

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 8376
  • Joined: 01 Mar 2008
  • Loc: Mantrap Lake, MN

Posted 10 September 2017 - 11:45 PM

All you need to do to solve something like this is check the POSS plates at one of the servers.  Though in this case, it was obvious from your image it was three stars.  they are connected by the slight elongation that runs into the diffraction spikes.

 

Rick



#3 steven_usa

steven_usa

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 957
  • Joined: 06 May 2014
  • Loc: Texas

Posted 11 September 2017 - 12:51 AM

Thanks for the reference.  In my original AstroBin image, the spikes weren't aligned, so I wasn't sure.  

 

Can anyone report on what the following is, at:  J2000

 

RA 18h 50m 24s
DEC -01:40:16

MAST reference

or

https://mast.stsci.e...24s,  -01:40:16

 

 

This also slightly appears in my own backyard image (characterized by a red "smudge" flanked by two dark nebulas).

get.jpg


Edited by steven_usa, 11 September 2017 - 12:54 AM.


#4 cildarith

cildarith

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2757
  • Joined: 26 Aug 2004
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 11 September 2017 - 09:29 AM

Can anyone report on what the following is, at:  J2000

RA 18h 50m 24s
DEC -01:40:16
MAST reference
or
https://mast.stsci.e...24s,  -01:40:16


This also slightly appears in my own backyard image (characterized by a red "smudge" flanked by two dark nebulas).

 

 

That is planetary nebula PK 31-00.2 (also known as HrTr 10).


  • steven_usa likes this

#5 steven_usa

steven_usa

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 957
  • Joined: 06 May 2014
  • Loc: Texas

Posted 11 September 2017 - 05:11 PM

Thanks, great article!    Would love to see a "close up" someday.



#6 cildarith

cildarith

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2757
  • Joined: 26 Aug 2004
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 11 September 2017 - 08:14 PM

Agreed.  The best image I could find was from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey:

 

HrTr 10.jpg


  • steven_usa likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics