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Gibbous Moon with Celestron C90 and a ZWO ASI174MM

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#1 james7ca

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 01:05 AM

As captured on the morning of September 11, 2017 using a Celestron C90 (90mm aperture Maksutov-Cassegrain, f/13.9) and a ZWO ASI174MM camera.

 

This is a three panel mosaic in red light with image processing in Autostakkert! (best 20% of 2000 x 3, 1.5X drizzle), Registax (wavelet sharpening), and Photoshop CC2017 (photo montage and tweaks).

 

I had to reduce the image size to conform to the CN posting guidelines, but here is a link to Flickr where you can view a larger sized image:

 

 https://flic.kr/p/XpyrvF

 

At full size the image scale is approximately 0.8 arc seconds per pixel (this is the same angular size as a dime when viewed from a distance of 2.8 miles). I was glad to be able to just resolve Hadley Rille (landing site of Apollo 15), the craterlets around Copernicus, and some nice detail in the floor of the crater Aristarchus (see crops, Hadley on lower left, Aristarchus on the upper left).

 

This is a good time of the year to be photographing the waning moon, since the moon is very high in the sky (early in the morning).

 

Below you have the reduced image and a set of crops shown at the full image scale.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Waning Gibbous Moon with C90 (Small).jpg
  • Waning Gibbous Moon 1X Crops.jpg

Edited by james7ca, 12 September 2017 - 03:35 AM.

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#2 RedLionNJ

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 09:29 AM

Very nice - and a lighting phase I am not too familiar with, to be honest.

 

I'm particularly not used to seeing Mons Piton mainly DARK - I'm used to seeing it lighting up the area around it!

 

The observation on Hadley Rille is interesting - I wouldn't consider such a small, linear feature to be 'resolved' - detected, yes. But I think you would need it to subtend a few more pixels (maybe only 2 or 3) to be considered 'resolved'.

 

A very nice example of excellent seeing (or at least seeing which matches the ability of the optics), though. Good job.

 

I should lug out my smaller scopes on more occasions. Rarely is the seeing up to the aperture of my 12-inch :(


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#3 kevinbreen

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 10:01 AM

Excellent detail.
I might try my C90 next time, I haven't used it in about 4 years! Well done, Sir!!

#4 david-p

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:56 AM

Nice detail. Thanks for sharing. I had no idea that a 90mm aperture could produce such quality.



#5 kevinbreen

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 04:13 PM

My best shot from the night of September 11

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Image2.jpg


#6 kevinbreen

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 12:12 PM

As captured on the morning of September 11, 2017 using a Celestron C90 (90mm aperture Maksutov-Cassegrain, f/13.9) and a ZWO ASI174MM camera.

 

This is a three panel mosaic in red light with image processing in Autostakkert! (best 20% of 2000 x 3, 1.5X drizzle), Registax (wavelet sharpening), and Photoshop CC2017 (photo montage and tweaks).

 

I had to reduce the image size to conform to the CN posting guidelines, but here is a link to Flickr where you can view a larger sized image:

 

 https://flic.kr/p/XpyrvF

 

At full size the image scale is approximately 0.8 arc seconds per pixel (this is the same angular size as a dime when viewed from a distance of 2.8 miles). I was glad to be able to just resolve Hadley Rille (landing site of Apollo 15), the craterlets around Copernicus, and some nice detail in the floor of the crater Aristarchus (see crops, Hadley on lower left, Aristarchus on the upper left).

 

This is a good time of the year to be photographing the waning moon, since the moon is very high in the sky (early in the morning).

 

Below you have the reduced image and a set of crops shown at the full image scale.

Hi again. Can you tell me please what software you used to assemble the mosai?

thanks



#7 james7ca

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 07:42 PM

Photoshop for the montage/mosaic.




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