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Lagoon Nebula in Galactic Core of the Milky Way

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#1 Rudy Pohl

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:15 AM

Solar Panel installation in Beckwith Township in rural west Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

 

Lagoon_Nebula_solar panels-FINAL4_500kb.jpg

 

See larger image in my Flickr gallery: https://www.flickr.c.../in/dateposted/

 

Nikon D5500
Nikon 50/f1.8
Aperture: 2.8
ISO: 400
Exposure: 10 x 2-minutes = 20 minutes
Hoya Intensifier anti-light pollution filter
Tracked and stacked
Tracker: Sky Watcher Star Adventurer
Stacking: Deep Sky Stacker
Processed in Photoshop CS5
Foreground: 2 minutes, 12mm, @ f4, ISO 1600, untracked

 

Note: The Milky Way was shot at 50mm focal length and the foreground was shot at 12mm from the same spot in the field in order to give the dramatic artistic impression of a massive Milky Way Galaxy looking down a tiny little earth.

 

Cheers,
Rudy


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#2 happylimpet

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:28 AM

Hmmmmm...... I must say the composite nature of this makes it look very artificial, especially the lack of extinction near the horizon. But I am notoriously a wet blanket about these sorts of things so dont let my negativity ruin your day.


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#3 Rudy Pohl

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:31 AM

Hmmmmm...... I must say the composite nature of this makes it look very artificial, especially the lack of extinction near the horizon. But I am notoriously a wet blanket about these sorts of things so dont let my negativity ruin your day.

Hey, not a problem happylimpet, different strokes for different folks! Enjoy the stars!

 

Cheers,
Rudy


Edited by Rudy Pohl, 13 September 2017 - 10:32 AM.

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#4 Ken Watts

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 12:26 PM

Awe inspiring!



#5 JohnPlenge

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 06:30 PM

Neat pic!!  As a relative newbie, I have to ask - what does "extinction near the horizon" mean?



#6 Rudy Pohl

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 06:33 PM

Neat pic!!  As a relative newbie, I have to ask - what does "extinction near the horizon" mean?

Thanks for bringing that up John, being a relative newcomer myself I was also planning to ask  the same question. Can someone explain what this is or direct us to a good link that describes it? Thanks,

 

Rudy



#7 Rudy Pohl

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 07:07 PM

Hmmmmm...... I must say the composite nature of this makes it look very artificial, especially the lack of extinction near the horizon. But I am notoriously a wet blanket about these sorts of things so dont let my negativity ruin your day.

Hi again happylimpet,

 

In light of your previous comment, which by the way I completely understand, I thought I would give you a little background as to part of the reason why I do Milky Way landscape composites.

 

Our greatest challenge shooting the Milky Way here in the rural countryside surrounding Ottawa where I live is that there is so much light pollution in every direction, both from Ottawa itself and from several large towns encircling the city from 40-60 kms away, that you just have to learn to live with it and experiment with strategies to mitigate it.

 

There's no way of avoiding it and if you're like me with a health condition, driving long distances late at night alone in the car in order to get to dark skies is just not a possibility. That's one of the reasons why I like doing composites, it helps to put the foreground landscape a little higher up to cover up some of the huge light pollution domes. In the composite image above I decided to eliminate it altogether... probably overdid things a bit... oh well, live and learn.

 

Best regards,
Rudy



#8 ImNewHere

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 08:20 PM

Extinction is where it fades out at the horizon.


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#9 happylimpet

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 04:37 AM

Yup - everything gets a bit murky and brown near the horizon, even without light pollution, its just the nature of how the atmosphere absorbs and scatters light. Having bright white stars all the way to the horizon immediately looks artificial.



#10 JohnPlenge

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 06:21 AM

Thanks!!



#11 Rudy Pohl

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 06:42 AM

Yup - everything gets a bit murky and brown near the horizon, even without light pollution, its just the nature of how the atmosphere absorbs and scatters light. Having bright white stars all the way to the horizon immediately looks artificial.

Thanks for that explanation happy.

 

Rudy



#12 JukkaP

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 01:40 PM

That is one sweet image. I like it. Most of our images are somewhat artificial anyway.

#13 Rudy Pohl

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 02:46 PM

By the way, here is the typical kind of light pollution we deal with in rural west and rural south Ottawa, and virtually just as bad in rural east Ottawa. The light dome on the left is the town of Perth 40 kilometers away and the massive dome on the right is Carleton Place 15 kilometers away, this is even with the Hoya anti-light pollution filter on the lens.

 

It's pretty well the same story regardless of which direction we shoot in. Coming up with good looking Milky Way landscapes is quite a trick around here, hence my resorting to composite images to create images that I can at least stand to look at. LP filter plus creative processing is the only way.... it's a challenge for sure.

 

Rudy

 

rows1and2_Panorama1_900px.jpg



#14 Darrenlh

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 02:53 PM

I think you did a good job. When light pollution handed you a lemon....well, you know the rest.



#15 HockeyGuy

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 11:09 PM

Sure, it's different processing than typical.

 

I love it.



#16 Traveler

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 04:56 AM

Rudy, i see you used a Nikon 50mm F1.8 and set to F2.8. How the **** grin.gif did you get such small stars? When i using my Nikon 50mm F1.8, i have to set it to 5.6 at least....



#17 Rudy Pohl

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 08:21 AM

Rudy, i see you used a Nikon 50mm F1.8 and set to F2.8. How the **** grin.gif did you get such small stars? When i using my Nikon 50mm F1.8, i have to set it to 5.6 at least....

Hi Traveler,

 

Gee, I really don't know, nothing special... I just focused the lens and shot..., f2.8 does a great job on this lens. It's actually not bad at f1.8, even better at f2.0-f2.5, but fabulous at f2.8.... best $185 I've ever spent on photo gear!

 

Cheers,
Rudy


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#18 starblue

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 03:28 PM

Note: The Milky Way was shot at 50mm focal length and the foreground was shot at 12mm from the same spot in the field in order to give the dramatic artistic impression of a massive Milky Way Galaxy looking down a tiny little earth.

As an artistic interpretation I think it's fine, but the particular structures in view are pretty massive themselves and rather unidentifiable, so they somewhat counteract what you were trying to accomplish, I think. As regards extinction, why not introduce some to make it more realistic?



#19 Rudy Pohl

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 05:33 PM

 

Note: The Milky Way was shot at 50mm focal length and the foreground was shot at 12mm from the same spot in the field in order to give the dramatic artistic impression of a massive Milky Way Galaxy looking down a tiny little earth.

As an artistic interpretation I think it's fine, but the particular structures in view are pretty massive themselves and rather unidentifiable, so they somewhat counteract what you were trying to accomplish, I think. As regards extinction, why not introduce some to make it more realistic?

 

Hi there and thanks for you input, 

 

Yes, when I created this composite image I knew full well that it would look artificial and I posted it here in a serious astro forum with some hesitation for that reason; I can understand and appreciate why some folks cannot warm up to it. I was definitely wanting to create the kind of dramatic artistic impression that I described in my original post, of a massive Milky Way looking down on a tiny little earth, and hopefully have achieved that to some degree.

 

For integrity sake I disclosed that this was a composite image shot at two different focal lengths in order to achieve a dramatic effect. Given that, I don't know if I'd want to add some simulated extinction in order to make the whole thing look less artificial. Anyways, I'll have to give that some thought, thanks for the suggestion.

 

To compensate for the artificial composition, I put an extra effort into processing a good-looking sky, hopefully. For what it's worth, that really was the real foreground and that really was the real sky shot at the same location and the same time of night. I simply decided to cover up the massive light pollution dome by shooting the foreground wide and raising it higher up in post while at the same time going for the dramatic effect. Again, it's not for everyone, but I like it.

 

Cheers,
Rudy 


Edited by Rudy Pohl, 15 September 2017 - 06:07 PM.



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