Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

The Colors of 1 Aries, Struve 174

art Celestron double star observing report sketching
  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 mauigazer

mauigazer

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 112
  • Joined: 07 Mar 2009
  • Loc: Maui, Hawaii

Posted 13 October 2017 - 02:05 AM

Here's a subtle colored pair in Aries, Struve 174, WDS 01501+2217. The Stelle Doppie listing is here.
I observed this on my annual "Birthday Session" this past September 22/23, 2017 at our HAA Site on the summit. I was observing with a Celestron C925/CGEM on a pier. For the Low Power view I used a 2" Explore Scientific 18mm at 130X and for the High Power view I used a new Tele Vue Delos 6mm at 392X.
There are some very dim stars in the Low Power view and I'm not sure if they are correct. SAO 74969, Mag. 8.5, anchors the position in the Low Power view. John Nanson's Star Splitters post from January, 2014 can be found here. His sketch is quite similar to mine although the observed colors, as they sometimes do with all of us, come into question. John emailed me and said, "The primary is G3 and the secondary is B3.  So what we should be seeing according to those classifications is yellow and bluish-white.  But when two stars are that close together, the colors tend to blend together to some degree." I saw the primary as yellow and the companion as silver/blue. The WX conditions were deteriorating and a pronounced airy disc surrounded the brighter stars. Sissy Haas in her book, "Double Stars for Small Telescopes" writes that the pair are "bright Sun yellow and pale ocean blue"; Webb says, "Gold, very blue," Smyth, "Topaz yellow, smalt blue."
What colors do you see?
The sketch was rendered with a #2 lead pencil on white Log paper, scanned and reworked in GIMP. (A larger file of this sketch is in MauiGazer's Double Star Gallery).
Looking UP,
S. McG.

 

1 Arietis STF 174 Small.jpg


Edited by mauigazer, 13 October 2017 - 01:17 PM.

  • R Botero, flt158 and nerich like this

#2 flt158

flt158

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 485
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2014
  • Loc: Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Posted 13 October 2017 - 12:45 PM

Hello again, Steve. 

I do respect your sketches always. 

1 Arietis is a big favourite binary of mine. 

It stuns me every time in my WIlliam Optics 158 mm apo. 

Easily split at 112X at each observation. 

Maybe some night I will use high magnifications. 

I completely agree with your yellow and blue colours. 

I am not so precise with those varied details. 

Perhaps others will be.  

 

Thanks so much, 

And belated happy birthday from Aubrey. 


  • nerich likes this

#3 mauigazer

mauigazer

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 112
  • Joined: 07 Mar 2009
  • Loc: Maui, Hawaii

Posted 13 October 2017 - 01:42 PM

Thanks, Aubrey,

Somehow I missed this pair until now! It isn't on the AL Double Star Program. I stumbled across the pair on the Sky & Telescope Colorful Doubles List. What a surprise! I looked it up on John Nanson's blog and he did such a great job of covering it. It's in the sky this time of year so I took the time to observe it. Yes, and I love to try to depict the colors of the stars. Sometimes at higher magnifications the colors blur. Sometimes, however, they pop out! In this case, with my new Delos 6mm EP, the colors intensified at the higher power. As there was a pronounced airy disc around the pair, the colors seemed to glow a little more. Looking up the spectrum of the stars helps justify what I'm seeing at the EP. We have many powerful reference tools at our fingertips that were't available even 20 years ago!

It was indeed a beautiful night of observing on my birthday. This time of year the atmosphere and WX settles down a little more affording much better seeing and transparency.

Thanks for the feedback.

S. McG.


  • flt158 likes this

#4 nerich

nerich

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 171
  • Joined: 11 Jun 2016
  • Loc: Greensboro, NC

Posted 14 October 2017 - 10:27 AM

Beautiful sketches Steve! I'll have to check this one out when the weather clears. 
I also really enjoy John's blog. He played a huge part in inspiring me to start observing doubles.
I'm not totally convinced about using high magnification on doubles in this separation range. Don't get me wrong, I still do it! Even with wide doubles, I'll sometimes use ridiculous powers, get lost in the darkness, and lose track of time and space.
But generally, I find that after a certain point I'm unable to gain any more insight into the color nuances. More aperture certainly helps in this regard. I normally observe with 150mm; your C925 will keep giving color long after my scope has run out of juice.  
What's been your experience with color changes at higher powers? Other than the "getting lost in space" effect, what attracts you to using higher powers when the star was split miles back? 
Thanks again for the great sketches and observation. 

-Nick


  • mauigazer and flt158 like this

#5 chrysalis

chrysalis

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1860
  • Joined: 10 Aug 2013
  • Loc: North Central NC

Posted 14 October 2017 - 05:04 PM

Beautiful sketches Steve! I'll have to check this one out when the weather clears. 
I also really enjoy John's blog. He played a huge part in inspiring me to start observing doubles.
I'm not totally convinced about using high magnification on doubles in this separation range. Don't get me wrong, I still do it! Even with wide doubles, I'll sometimes use ridiculous powers, get lost in the darkness, and lose track of time and space.
But generally, I find that after a certain point I'm unable to gain any more insight into the color nuances. More aperture certainly helps in this regard. I normally observe with 150mm; your C925 will keep giving color long after my scope has run out of juice.  
What's been your experience with color changes at higher powers? Other than the "getting lost in space" effect, what attracts you to using higher powers when the star was split miles back? 
Thanks again for the great sketches and observation. 

-Nick

I have noted in my 12" that the colors of double stars wash out at lower powers versus the same appearance in smaller apertures at the same magnification like 3". This is very noticeable on Albireo, Almach, and other bright doubles, where the colors seem brilliantly washed out, or maybe less saturated, than at lower aperture. The good news on this side is that dimmer colored doubles like h3945 in CMA ("Winter Albireo") seem more pleasingly colored in the large aperture.

 

I have also noted that with INCREASED MAGNIFICATION, some of the oversaturation of light decreases and the colors are more aesthetically pleasing. I guess this MAY have to do with decreased exit pupil...maybe? So that for me justifies higher powers for doubles where there is already plenty of separation.


  • mauigazer and nerich like this

#6 JimP

JimP

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1922
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2003
  • Loc: South Carolina

Posted 15 October 2017 - 09:47 AM

Observed 1 Ari last night with my CFF 160 and saw the colors as white with a yellowish tinge and bluish.

Seeing was good and the double was very pretty. Whether it is my 67 yo eyes or the sky transparency last night I found that doubles with a primary fainter than 6.0, with a few exceptions like 1 Ari, seemed a little on the dim side.  Actually the lens had dewed up! LOL!!


Edited by JimP, 15 October 2017 - 11:20 AM.

  • mauigazer and nerich like this

#7 mauigazer

mauigazer

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 112
  • Joined: 07 Mar 2009
  • Loc: Maui, Hawaii

Posted Today, 05:14 PM

Jim, I will agree wholeheartedly about the 67 YO eyes. Mine are 69 YO eyes and I need 2" EP's a lot of the time. "White with a yellowish tinge and bluish" are close to the colors I saw that night. I am fortunate that on nights when the seeing and transparency are good I can power up quite a bit at my location.

Thanks for the comments.

S. McG.

B.T.W. I'm still chasing the "D" component of Eta Perseus. Its a six star system covered very well by John Nanson here. As soon as I get it I'll be posting the sketch!!!




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: art, Celestron, double star, observing report, sketching



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics