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M1 the blah nebula

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#1 555aaa

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 12:51 AM

You know, without the Ha it really doesn't look like much. Maybe it's just me.

 

Canon 6D unmodified, 3 x 300 seconds, Meade 16" f/10. Homemade mount.

 

 

 

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  • m1_the_bland.jpg

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#2 pyrasanth

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 01:56 AM

Don't be too dismissive of your image- the detail is there you just need to bring it out

 

I did a lot of work on M1 including the HA which really sets the image on fire. I spent nearly a month on this one target and carried on into the following year! You can see a tiny rendition in my avatar image. If you PM me I will send you some images or give me permission and I will post in your thread here- I don't want to hijack your thread. Guiding has to be spot on to extract the finer details and good deconvolution techniques will really help to bring out the very fine detail. The shapes of your stars suggest guiding issues which you might want to look at. You have the general idea but you will need more subs and the guiding issue resolved to capture M1 in all its glory. It is an amazing target & I'm rolling out the C14 this weekend to spend a lot more time on this with the new aperture at my disposal.


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#3 ShaulaB

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 02:28 AM

The excitement with this object is knowing what it is: a supernova remnant. And that is went bang in 1054. It was observed visually and studied by Earthlings interested in science. Since it was the Dark Ages in Europe, more noteworthy recording of the event was done in Asia and North America.

 

If you compare astrophotos of the object from around 1920 to images made today, there are noticeable differences in size of the object. It has expanded in the 100 or so years that astroimaging has been around. If you can do some math., you might be able to determine, comparing size of your image to the size of an old image, how many kilometers per second the gas is traveling outward. Sounds like an AL award possibility even.

 

Meh indeed. flowerred.gif


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#4 555aaa

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:37 AM

I re-imaged this last night using my new / old SBIG STL-11000M camera, using Ha + Johnson/Cousins V and R (which are the two photometric filters I have). I mapped V to blue (totally wrong of course since it is a green filter) and R to green, and Ha to red. Then I did the prettification in Photoshop using the HDR toning tool - this is what I got in 15 minutes for Ha + 5 min each for the two broadband colors. It looks like what you see in a lot of posts, but it doesn't look anything like what the DSLR image looks like. It's "prettier", but the colors don't mean anything.When I overlaid the Ha onto the DSLR image, there are regions which appear to have emission that is multi-colored and the Ha when overlaid overwhelms the subtle blues which are in the DSLR image.

 

crabby_hdrtoned_flat.jpg

 


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