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#76 Microscopy

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Posted 07 February 2020 - 02:17 PM

Ironic, ruined my day but made me  LOL the next day: I received a message through the auction website, from ... a teacher.

He asked for a discount: he's a teacher, not rich, paying for the microscope out of his own pocket to use it in class.

Well, I agreed on the discount. I suppose I'm a nice guy, but a very poor businessman.


Edited by Microscopy, 07 February 2020 - 02:20 PM.

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#77 bumm

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Posted 12 February 2020 - 09:41 AM

BY ALL THAT'S DECENT AND HOLY, I'M NOT COLLECTING OLD MICROSCOPES! But sometimes one thing just leads to another...

For some time, I'd been enjoying harassing the local protozoa with my old brass Spencer, occasionally slipping a slide under my slightly later binocular Spencer model 54 for the novelty of a 3D show. Then, getting curious about dark field views, I bought a set of those plastic dark field occulting discs or whatever they're called that you slip into the filter holder under your condenser to give it a try. This worked very well, and gave an interesting view, giving more of an "outside view" of my little creatures with sometimes better visualization of fine detail such as flagella than the usual bright field view. But, it only worked at low powers, up to a 10x objective. Above that, the view deteriorated into poorly defined, shapeless masses of light.

Then I ran across a self illuminated dark field condenser on ebay... A Spencer Model 330 US Army Medical School Model. I knew the chances of it fitting my old brass Spencer were pretty iffy, but if it didn't fit, it came in an elegantly made wooden box with a beveled lid to keep it in, as such stuff often did back then, until I figured out what to do with it . And fortunately, it came with it's instructions. Otherwise, it would've taken me considerable time and frustration to figure out the importance of getting it exactly centered, how to center it, the need for oil contact between the condenser and slide, the recommended thickness of the slide, etc. This stuff was evidently kinda persnickety. And suffice it to say, it didn't fit my old brass Spencer. Which is just as well. It would be pretty cumbersome switching out and continually adjusting condensers if it had fit.

I set about getting the illuminator on it to work until I figured what to do. It required a 6 or 4 volt bulb with a 15mm bayonette base with 2 contacts on the bottom, and recommended a "Hot Shot Battery." Every place was fresh outa both. After considerable searching, the closest I could do was a 15 volt automotive bulb. The same size and configuration, just different voltage. I bought several to last me the rest of my life, and then purchased an AC-DC 12 volt adapter and built it into a little stand with a knob to control brightness. At first, I was a little concerned about heat, but this thing didn't seem to get too warm.

I started looking for another microscope to permanently mount it on. My dark field condenser was listed in the 1924 and '27 catalogues available free online, so I figured that a scope from one of those would be a good gamble. Due to the fact that I'd also figured out that the position of the condenser was pretty exacting, I decided to go for one with the recently improved rack and pinion substage thingy. I settled on looking for what appeared to be a Model 44 from the '27 catalogue and started watching ebay. This was a very popular stand, so it didn't take long for a few to show up. Also, the fact that they were common made them less valuable, which made them affordable. Good for my purposes. Before long a decent one turned up and it was mine. But... the existing condenser had the beveled adapter to snap into the substage cast right into it. I had to find another adapter to fit my dark field condenser. More ebaying. I found what should work on a similar dark field condenser which was missing it's illuminator. Problem solved, and everything now fit together.

Now it was time to learn to USE this thing... In it's description of Spencer's Dark Field Illuminators, the 1924 Spencer catalog says in part, "Dark Field Illuminators have now come to be accepted as a necessary accessory to the microscope for certain types of work, such as the detection of minute colloidal particles held in suspension in fluids or for examining unstained and living bacteria --" My main interest was more along the lines of protozoa, and I had previously seen hints of advantages at lower powers. However, this higher power dark field stuff was more "technique sensitive." The directions specified a slide thickness of 1.5mm, although a thinner slide would work by lowering the condenser as long as oil contact was maintained. I ordered some slides off ebay that claimed to be 1.5, but they were only 1.34mm. A shallow well slide I had came closer at 1.44mm on the flat sides. Either worked, but I had to use a considerable amount of immersion oil, which tended to wind up smeared all over the stage as I followed my animalcules around. I had no problems at the age of 8 getting my father's old microscope to work well with traditional bright field stuff, but now as a 69 year old, I was having to figure my way into this dark field thing. The usable depth of field seemed to be smaller, and the out of focus areas were more distracting being "lit" against the dark background. If the water was too murky, an annoying amount of halation erupted. The effect was less effective if there was too much "stuff" in the way, such as the lacework of algae that I often used to confine my microscopic critters as I looked at them... although the threads of algae were often beautiful. As time went by though, I was gradually getting more adept at this thing... When everything fell into place, fine external details, cilia, and flagella showed up wonderfully, and I was seeing my little creatures more like they might see each other, from the outside, although "lit up." A nice tool to have in the box. Then, the day came when I was looking at a few smaller protozoa in a few drops of rather "depleted" water from a jar I''d left sitting for too long using a shallow well slide... Most of the interesting stuff was gone. I don't know why I pulled out the dark field scope, but when I did, dropping the condenser a bit to compensate for the thin well after slopping on the immersion oil, I saw BACTERIA lit up like starlight against the dark background! Mostly bacilli, but a few flashy spirochetes winding through the field sort of like John Travolta in "Urban Cowboy." Cool... I wondered how I'd missed them before. I put the slide back on the other scope for bright field, and yes, they were there, but not nearly as conspicuous... I'd missed them as "background noise" while looking for my larger protozoa. This socked home the above old catalog description, and I'd learned a little more. I now find myself developing a little more interest in bacteria, too. Like I said earlier, one thing leads to another.

                                                                                                                                                              Marty

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#78 j.gardavsky

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Posted 12 February 2020 - 11:13 AM

Thank you Frank for having started this thread!

 

The classic microscopes are related to the distinguished technical advances in the functionality and applicability of the microscopes to different areas of application in medicine, biology, material sciences, and other fields of application.

 

Regarding what is vintage and what not, this is a more difficult question to answer. I would put the mark in the times between WWI and WWII. During the WWII and after, the manufactured volumes of the microscopes have experienced a rapid increase, and the microscopes became more affordable.

 

Well, my collection is small, even if I have some "landmarks" on the way of the microscopes making history.

As soon as possible, I will take some pics, and post them here,

JG


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#79 TakeMeToYourLeader

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 12:58 AM

Just recently acquired a Meopta Stereo Microscope (late 40s to mid 50s built I guess), made in Czechoslovakia.
Seems to have all the bits and pieces. I'm a little bit hesitant to use the lamp as 240v exposed wires in a all metal casing is a shock hazard.
If anyone has experience or opinions on these microscopes be happy to hear about them.

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#80 j.gardavsky

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 01:26 PM

It looks like a very good stereo microscope of that time, and with the classic objectives pairs.

Quite interesting, and looking forward to your first tests,

 

JG



#81 Motodelta

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 07:07 AM

My Zeiss Ultrophot One. Made during WW205AECB82-2057-46BC-884B-6F262429B8AB.jpeg


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#82 Mike E.

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 11:41 AM

A couple of years ago I ventured into microscopy by purchasing a Nkon SMZ-2 stereo microscope, and it has been an enjoyable experience examining many objects on occasion and providing an interesting distraction on cloudy & rainy nights. 

 

As my interest and knowledge has advanced, I decided to look for a compound microscope, and like the Nikon, wanted to begin with an older lab quality model built to higher mechanical standards than modern imports. I've noticed that pre-owned microscopes, even the very high priced  desirable models, seem to be almost always equipped for sale with lower grade objectives rather than those which they were designed for; so when I saw this vintage PZO phase contrast microscope offered on ebay, I noted it came with a complete compliment of matching objectives and accessories. There were only a few low bids, and at the last moment I put in a bid to win and fortunately got it for a low price. smile.png  

 

The Turret has positions for 5 objectives. The four supplied, ……. 10x phz, 20x phz, 40x phz, and 100x phz (oil) correspond to four of the five diaphram positions provided and marked for them on the condenser unit; the fifth position is marked with a zero and has a clear lens. I have sourced a PZO 5x objective for the turret which should arrive soon.

 

Each accessory, ……. binocular viewer, eyepieces, condenser, and including all 4 objectives have the letters C.B.U.N engraved on them.

I wonder what it indicates ?

 

Edit: Sorry, been trying but can't seem to rotate photos on this computer.

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Edited by Mike E., 03 July 2020 - 12:44 PM.

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#83 starbob1

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Posted 06 July 2020 - 07:03 AM

Hey Mike go here and post your pic. They know every scope made.

 

http://www.microbehu...croscopy-forum/


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#84 Mike E.

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Posted 06 July 2020 - 12:50 PM

Hey Mike go here and post your pic. They know every scope made.

 

http://www.microbehu...croscopy-forum/

Hello Bob,

 

Thanks for the link. waytogo.gif  I've registered and am awaiting approval. Noticed that Oliver is the site owner. I have already seen a few of his videos. smile.png


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#85 starbob1

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Posted 07 July 2020 - 07:55 AM

Its a great site for all things Microscopes. They will know. Oliver is a really cool guy.


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#86 joecomet

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 02:10 PM

I have a 'GUNDLACH OPTICAL CO.' OF ROCHESTER NY.   My father used it as a Industrial Designer for a large wax paper company.in the 40"s  I know this optical company is no longer in business.  I believe it to be from the late 1800's or early 1900's  All Brass.

It is bi-ocular--- one D 1/5 and one B 2/3 IN. also an oil immersion ocular.  Eye piece 1 inch.and 1/2 inch  Adjustable under stage with diaphragm. Double-jointed mirror with flat and concave mirrors.  Standard two wheel type main focus with a fine focus on the main support in the shape of a cone with a flat base.  I would like an estimate and willing to sell.  Joseph Haley Tallahassee Fl. jhaley3rd/@msn.com


Edited by joecomet, 30 September 2020 - 06:16 PM.


#87 Mike E.

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 11:26 AM

Got lucky on a bid for a vintage Izumi Petrological Microscope, made in Japan dated 1969. It is in as new condition with all of the relevant original accessories. The optics are clean and every feature functions smoothly, as it should; and none of the screws look like they have seen a screwdriver. It appears as though has never been used.

 

This will be for my Niece's daughter, who is doing exceptionally well in school for a kid of her age. She is very interested in science and geology, and has been wanting a microscope for awhile. Today my Wife & I will surprise her with this unexpected gift. smile.png

.

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Edited by Mike E., 07 October 2020 - 11:38 AM.

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#88 Rapidray

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 12:35 PM

Now that’s going to make her day! That’s a great gift! I am sure she will treasure it.



#89 NGC704

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 12:42 PM

Rapidray, you got that right - I kinda wish I were that kid, lol. Beautiful microscope!



#90 Jim7728

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Posted 26 December 2020 - 08:33 AM

Was left by a relative... E. Leitz Wetzlar from the 1960's?.... found in my basement cleanout.

 

Microscope.jpg

 

Unfortunately, no eyepieces and fine focus does not appear to be functioning.  It does look good on a bookshelf and hefty enough to be a doorstop.grin.gif


Edited by Jim7728, 26 December 2020 - 11:43 AM.

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#91 j.gardavsky

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Posted 26 December 2020 - 11:08 AM

A left by a relative E. Leitz Wetzlar from the 1960's?.... found in my basement cleanout.

 

attachicon.gifMicroscope.jpg

 

Unfortunately, no eyepieces and fine focus does not appear to be functioning.  It does look good on a bookshelf and hefty enough to be a doorstop.grin.gif

Hello Jim,

 

according to the S/N, your Leitz has been manufactured around 1910,

http://www.ernst-lei...riennummern.htm

It is the research grade version (possibly AA) with the wide tube. The concept of your microscope has ben manufactured by Leitz 1902 - 1955.

The missing eyepieces from that time can be found on the eBay,

https://www.r99sale....re&categoryId=0

 

A nice piece of history,

JG


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#92 Jim7728

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Posted 26 December 2020 - 11:39 AM

Hello Jim,

 

according to the S/N, your Leitz has been manufactured around 1910,

http://www.ernst-lei...riennummern.htm

It is the research grade version (possibly AA) with the wide tube. The concept of your microscope has ben manufactured by Leitz 1902 - 1955.

The missing eyepieces from that time can be found on the eBay,

https://www.r99sale....re&categoryId=0

 

A nice piece of history,

JG

Oh my,  feels like a Antiques Roadshow moment. lol.gif

 

JG,

 

Thank you very much for the history.  I'm going to give that microscope some TLC....no doorstop.


Edited by Jim7728, 26 December 2020 - 11:44 AM.

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#93 j.gardavsky

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Posted 26 December 2020 - 01:34 PM

Hello Jim,

 

don't try to refuirbish the microscope, no chemicals, no polishing, just blow away the dust, and leave it in the original condition as found. Should you find a suited EP, then mount it on the microscope.

 

Otherwise, it would be nice to post some pictures, to see the details of the mechanics, and especially the mechanics on the condensor below the microscope table.

 

Some of these research grade microscopes have been sold from a Leitz vendor located in New York, others have been sent to the U.S. from Germany.

 

Best,

JG


Edited by j.gardavsky, 26 December 2020 - 01:36 PM.


#94 Jim7728

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Posted 27 December 2020 - 09:53 AM

Hello Jim,

 

don't try to refuirbish the microscope, no chemicals, no polishing, just blow away the dust, and leave it in the original condition as found. Should you find a suited EP, then mount it on the microscope.

 

Otherwise, it would be nice to post some pictures, to see the details of the mechanics, and especially the mechanics on the condensor below the microscope table.

 

Some of these research grade microscopes have been sold from a Leitz vendor located in New York, others have been sent to the U.S. from Germany.

 

Best,

JG

Thank you, I only wiped down with a damp cloth.  

 

Here's the condensor.

microscope 1.jpg

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#95 j.gardavsky

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Posted 27 December 2020 - 03:39 PM

Thank you Jim for the documenting pictures.

 

Tomorrow, I will copy from the Leitz book some more details,

JG


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#96 j.gardavsky

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 05:36 AM

Hello Jim,

 

here we are,

 

Leitz microscope AA.jpg

 

The wide tube has been for an optional microphotography.

 

Best,

JG


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#97 Jim7728

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 08:57 AM

Very interesting.   Thank you again JG for your generous research in background of my vintage microscope.   


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#98 Valeur

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Posted 13 March 2021 - 06:56 AM

This week I got hands on this vintage Karl Kaps Microscope for only 40$. It is from the same area as Leitz and look very much like one of those.
I seem to be in very good order, and with 3 sets of oculars and 4 Karl Kaps lenses.
The only problem so far is, I cannot change the eye view so it fits my eyes. It looks simple with a screw, but it is not possible to move.
I have mailed Karl Kaps, men they don't have any manuals of these vintage Microscopes.

Anyone have any suggestions how to change the view, will be very welcome, thanks.

 
 

KarlKaps3
Album: KarlKaps
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#99 joecomet

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Posted 02 May 2021 - 06:43 AM

Frank

Hope you got the post I sent.

My old microscope looks the same as yours on the first pic of you set of pics.  Mine is built just like the B&L you have but was built by GUNDEACH OPTICAL OF NY.  Mine has lost the protective coating on the main barrel. Afraid to polish it;  Two eye pieces, and three lenses.  One is an oil immersion. My father used it in his office.  He was a designer and engineer in the Wax Paper industry.  jhaley3rd@msn.com   Will sell.

 

 



#100 Rodango

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Posted 30 June 2021 - 07:48 PM

This is a Bausch-Lomb Microscope (that’s the obvious part) which I think was made about 1945. It has the original box and a few eyepieces. That’s about all I know about it. 

 

IMG 1951
IMG 1952
 

I’d really appreciate a little more information from you experts here and if anyone knows the part number or even the availability of the proper illuminator, I’d really appreciate it. 

 

Thanks!


Edited by Rodango, 30 June 2021 - 07:53 PM.

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