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Many Chromebooks now run Android apps, so...

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#76 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 11:40 AM

Higher grade Chromebook:

Rockchip OP1 (  https://www.theverge...rocessor-apptop  )

4GB RAM, 32GB flash eMMC all important play part in this alternative solution.

 

The ASUS 302 that Nick gave me seems plenty fast, it has an Intel M3 generation 6 processor 4 GB ram and 64 GB of storage.  

 

"Not so with the Chromebook Plus, which managed to handle well over a dozen Chrome tabs before it started breaking a sweat. It isn’t quite up to the tasks that a $1,000 Mac or Chromebook Pixel would be, but it’s also half the price at $450. When I ran the standard Chrome benchmarks on the Plus, it performed better than every ARM Chromebook that’s been released so far — it was very much on par with low and midrange Intel Chromebooks."

 

I'm not sure where the 302 fits in but it doesn't sweat chrome tabs, I was running 15 including 3 YouTube videos..

 

jon



#77 Sean Wood

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 08:07 PM

If anyone is interested in trying this out with out breaking the bank. Woot.com typically has Chromebooks on sale in their computer woot header. Just check the model against the models that are listed as having access on the chromium site. These Chromebooks are refurbished units typically from education leases and still work fine. I have bought 2 in the past. One I still currently use and another I gave to a friend that is still currently using. 

An example of savings is this , Currently on the HP website the HP Chromebook 13 G1 configured  with Intel® Pentium® 4405Y (1.5 GHz, 2 MB cache, 2 cores) + 4 GB LPDDR3 RAM + integrated Intel® HD Graphics 515 (V6Q38AV) is $757.72 and on woot they have a refurb of the exact model for $279.99 with the exact same 1year HP warranty..This is an Android app approved model that already has the update in the stable OS channel so if you got it you'd just have to update the OS and enable using the Google Play store. They also have the 11-5G modele that are on the approved list for between $140 and $180 depending on whether you want touch and how much storage you want. You can even go down to a 2gb ram model and get it for $120. the selection isn't always HP sometimes they have Asus and samsung and other models too. Just keep an eye out.

 

Here is a list of Play store approved and enabled Chromebooks for reference. It will change as they update the models available so check it before you buy. If the model you want is listed as being enabled in the Beta Channel that just means you'll have to change the OS update channel to get the play store.

https://sites.google...ng-android-apps


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#78 mclewis1

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 11:52 PM

Woot is indeed a great source for various types of PCs and such. Remember that to run Android apps on a Chromebook that the Chromebook must be at a specific revision level (the "Android app approved" that Sean mentioned) ... and many of the earlier models will not run Android apps. 

 

Always look beyond the great prices and know exactly what you are buying, especially from a source like Woot where returning a product is not always an option.


Edited by mclewis1, 21 February 2018 - 11:59 PM.

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#79 Sean Wood

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 10:58 AM

Woot now has a 30 day return policy on most all items....

 

"What is Woot's return policy?

You may return most purchases within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. If the item being returned is not damaged or defective, we'll deduct the prepaid cost of return shipping from the refund. Once the item is received by Woot!, the refund will be applied. Please visit our Support page to initiate a return."

https://www.woot.com...s-return-policy



#80 halx

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 02:26 PM

Last week I saw a discussion about the linux VM support code spotted in the Chromium OS sources repo. Which means Chromebooks might support booting standard Linux distros in a sandbox natively soon. That would remove half of the problems I'm having about getting one instead of a normal laptop. But still not appealing much, as a normal laptop would offer much more bang for your buck.



#81 Sean Wood

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 03:12 PM

I use mine as a secondary device. I'm not going to take my primary laptop outdoors or on trips/vacation. My primary is usually hooked in one of my 3D printers anyhow lol. For a couple hundred dollars it suffices my needs as a grab and piddle device. Having android apps did make it a bit more useful. It added some much needed offline usability. The Linux dual boot has been possible for a while but it was a little half baked. If Google is in process of making it easier that would be added icing.


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#82 halx

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 04:02 PM

We'll see about the Linux soon. Until then, I'm OK taking my little Lenovo S41 or bigger MBP15 anywhere, as my 3d printer is perfectly running off the networked RPi2 smile.gif (OctoPrint), while the Main Laptop (a 12+ lbs 3DD&NLVE workstation grade monster) is living always at home.


Edited by halx, 26 February 2018 - 04:03 PM.


#83 JazzyOldMan

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 03:46 PM

I know this discussion has stopped for a while. But have some question regarding Chromebook & Skyportal Wifi. 

 

So far I couldn't get the SkyPortal on my Asus C101 to connect to the Celestron Nexstar Evo. THe NE works with my iPhone SykPortal but the Chromebook version will state that it could connect to the scope, but the scope doesn't response. I tried some manual command and list out the parameters from NE but didn't get me any progress so far.

 

Anybody had success connecting Chromebook SkyPortal/SkySafari to Celestron Wifi and control the scope?

 

Thanks & Regards

Jazzy


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#84 btschumy

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 04:50 PM

I haven't tried this myself, but I don't know of any reason this shouldn't work.



#85 JazzyOldMan

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 06:58 PM

Bill - Thank you for your prompt follow up. I just tried it again today with the same result.

 

I've heard that the Android environment on Chrome OS is a bit different from pure Android OS. So I guess that might be the root cause. (See link here for more details....see reply from DennyLfromGA). The other different is SkyPortal on iOS is the version 2.4.1. But the Android version is 2.3.1.  

 

Do you have anything I can trace/log to aid the diagnostic? Please let me know.

 

Cheers.....Jazzy.


Edited by JazzyOldMan, 04 April 2018 - 07:00 PM.


#86 mAnKiNd

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Posted 24 June 2018 - 02:20 PM

sounds like a Chromebook has a lot of potential for skysafari + the new ASIAIR..

#87 jrbarnett

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Posted 19 July 2018 - 11:25 AM

The ASUS 302 that Nick gave me seems plenty fast, it has an Intel M3 generation 6 processor 4 GB ram and 64 GB of storage.  

 

"Not so with the Chromebook Plus, which managed to handle well over a dozen Chrome tabs before it started breaking a sweat. It isn’t quite up to the tasks that a $1,000 Mac or Chromebook Pixel would be, but it’s also half the price at $450. When I ran the standard Chrome benchmarks on the Plus, it performed better than every ARM Chromebook that’s been released so far — it was very much on par with low and midrange Intel Chromebooks."

 

I'm not sure where the 302 fits in but it doesn't sweat chrome tabs, I was running 15 including 3 YouTube videos..

 

jon

I've found the only disadvantage of  Intel powered Chromebooks versus the latest generation of optimized ARM chip models is in running graphical Android apps.  For basic Chromebook stuff - browsing, word processing, etc., I think the better Intel powered units are actually faster.  For Android video games, though, the Rockchip unit is much smoother and faster (Android apps being optimized for ARM architecture due to the smartphone origin of that OS platform).

 

The only beef I have with my Samsung Plus model after many moons of use is battery life.  Rather that big, beautiful, bright, QHD touch screen consumes quite a lot of juice if I do not judiciously match brightness to ambient light conditions.  Cutting the brightness from 80% to 65% makes a big difference.  Compared to the Samsung Chromebook 3s I bought for kids and significant others last Christmas, the Plus isn't so battery efficient.  Those models use Intel chips, nice (best color gammut of any Chromebook) conventional non-touch screens, and 11 hours battery life without thinking about screen brightness is pretty easy.

 

If I had a "wish" for the next generation Samsung Plus it would be more aggressive automated power management settings, particularly for the screen and/or a bigger battery.  For SS use no problem; the screen is dim and I can easily get 8-9 hours a charge but used by day unwired with the beautiful bright screen blazing and the sound up (such as for FIFA world cup matches, which I watched here at work on the Chromebook) 5-6 hours was the norm.  At least it charges pretty quickly.  But I don't think anyone buys a Chromebook to use it while its charging - the whole point of the device is convenient size for real work and complete mobility.  

 

Best,

 

Jim


Edited by jrbarnett, 19 July 2018 - 11:32 AM.


#88 jrbarnett

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Posted 19 July 2018 - 11:40 AM

Last week I saw a discussion about the linux VM support code spotted in the Chromium OS sources repo. Which means Chromebooks might support booting standard Linux distros in a sandbox natively soon. That would remove half of the problems I'm having about getting one instead of a normal laptop. But still not appealing much, as a normal laptop would offer much more bang for your buck.

Have you found any Windows/Linux laptops that have these features (bang for the buck related)?

 

"Out of curiosity, are there *any* Windows laptops that satisfy the following conditions?

 

+ Gorilla glass rather than film display surface

+ Quad-HD display resolution

+ 400 nit brightness screen

+ Sub-$400 street price

+ All metal rather than plastic body

+ 12" or larger display

+ touchscreen display"

 

That's a lot of bling and bang for the buck, really.

 

- Jim


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#89 halx

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Posted 06 August 2018 - 04:31 PM

Jim, I'm talking about the "Big bang" - the ability to run desktop class apps. Not little bumps luring buyers grin.gif

But itemizing:
- gorilla glass is a nonsense on a laptop as its screen is protected when not in use. The impact will shatter it while plastic may survive with just a scratch. Just don't swirl your nunchucks working behind the screen.
- QuadHD display is similar to the camera megapixel hype. HD is adequate for 99% of real-life tasks. The QHD is meant for 80" wall TVs.

- 400 nit? Only significant for viewing in direct sunlight. I'd just seek for the shade first, or use my smartphone which sAMOLED has over 1000 nits.

- Sub $400? That's actually too much for this toy pseudo-laptop. My Lenevo S41 (i7 with 8Gb RAM and 256G SSD, Win10) is $500 shipped (refurb), but that's a decent workstation for just $100 more. Aluminum tops, plastic bottom. Though modern plastics are barely rivaled by ancient metals in consumer properties, except for the shiny looks of course ;)

- 12"? My s41 is 14". When the task is Ok on a smallish screen I'd rather go 8" (tablet) max - at least it's kinda pocketable which is a bigger "bang" for a buck as that's a fundamentally new feature (e.g. my first pocketable PC was the Sony VAIO VGN UX490N. $2800 back then for a reason, while its specs were on par with a $1000 normal laptop).

- Touchscreen? That's just a compensation for the smallish awkward keyboard and lack of a decent multitouch touchpad. If it's not a Wacom touchscreen I'd better ditch it in favor of normal size/pitch backlit keyboard (which that s41 has) in a clamshell form-factor device.

 

As I have said already (probably deleted by moderators) my point is that the Chromebook is a pseudo-laptop. All these bells and whistles are just smart marketing creating a new niche. $3k laptops are not all gone still for a reason. I don't mind people using Chromebook for some simple tasks though don't position it as a laptop replacement. It's not.

EDIT:
Real life example. Someone's son/grandson is going to the tech college. Misguided by this topic the parent may buy him a venerable Chromebook instead of a laptop. The young man will suffer at the school.
 


Edited by halx, 07 August 2018 - 05:33 PM.


#90 JazzyOldMan

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 03:38 PM

Didn't update this for a while but just want to let you know I got the Chromebook & SkyPortal work with Evolution Wifi.

 

Original issue I had was I could connect to WiFi signal from the Evo from Chromebook. But the SkyPortal (Android App) couldn't connect to the telescope. Some info from internet indicates that the network connectivity of Android App within ChromeOS is a bit different and if it can't access to internet (which it won't in this case), the Android may just simply block the access.

 

I played around with some set up and found out that in Chrome WiFI setting under the Celestron Connection (Celestron xxx), the app will work if I change the Name Servers (under Network section) from Automatic to Custom Name Server and use 1.2.3.4 as the name server. I've confirmed that this will work on both SkyPortal and SkySafari 6 plus.

 

Now I can use larger screen of my Chromebook. Still can't find the way to make the Evo work for Access Point mode though. Does it support WPA2? My home network uses WPA2 and I feel that might be the culprit.

 

Cheers


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#91 penguinx64

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 08:54 AM

I have 2 Chromebooks and neither one can install Android apps.  I only get a message saying "coming soon".  Soon?  It's been 2 years already, and ???  I even returned a Chromebook because it was advertised as Google Play Ready, but it couldn't install Android apps either.  Android Apps on a Chromebook are definitely not ready for prime time.



#92 Sean Wood

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 10:47 AM

My Asus Chromebook received the update and I was trotting right along using android apps with no issues. About six months later it updated again and ala'kazam all my android apps were gone along with the option to enable them.



#93 halx

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 05:56 PM

Meanwhile, I got a quite nice open box ASUS Vivo Windows 10S laptop for...

 

Tada! $163.97 shipped off Amazon (+Tax).

 

AMD quadcore CPU, 4G ram, 32G SSD (already extended that with the second 64GB SSD laying around after another laptop upgrade and upgraded it to Win 10 Pro for free), very nice quality 14" screen (SubHD 1366x768 but really good and clean looking colors), and a great sound system (needless to say it has all the standard modern external ports, including the USB-C and HDMI full, and a decent multitouch touchpad). We just needed an in-the-bed or couch-throw internet browser as I'm tired to hold the tablet in the hands and typing with one finger on it. It turned out to be much better than that after the system upgrade (model ASUS L402WA-EH21).

 

And guess what? It's running the official Android Emulator just fine (AMD Hardware acceleration is supported since the Android Studio 3.2 release in July). If you don't know, the Android Emulator it's the same or better than that support mode on Chromebooks and the totally official and mature tech (also free).


Edited by halx, 29 October 2018 - 05:58 PM.

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#94 btschumy

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 03:26 PM

Bill - Thank you for your prompt follow up. I just tried it again today with the same result.

 

I've heard that the Android environment on Chrome OS is a bit different from pure Android OS. So I guess that might be the root cause. (See link here for more details....see reply from DennyLfromGA). The other different is SkyPortal on iOS is the version 2.4.1. But the Android version is 2.3.1.  

 

Do you have anything I can trace/log to aid the diagnostic? Please let me know.

 

Cheers.....Jazzy.

I was just looking at this thread again and wondered if anyone has any updates.  I have another customer that sent me a scope log file and the very first "wakeup" command we send fails.  I wouldn't be surprised if Chromebook is blocking our socket communication.  Maybe there is a setting to override this.

 

If anyone has a SkyFi, I'd be curious if that fails in a similar fashion.



#95 Steve Cox

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 02:14 PM

Any new developments here?  I've been thinking about a Chromebook to replace my old Windows laptop and (eventually) my Android tablet.  But only if my Android apps can be reliably run on it.



#96 btschumy

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 12:56 PM

Steve,

 

We have just not had any time to look at this.  It is on my ToDo list.  Part of the problem is I don't have a Chromebook that runs Android apps so I will have to go buy new hardware.  We don't officially support this use of the app.

 

Bill


Edited by btschumy, 11 February 2019 - 01:01 PM.


#97 Steve Cox

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 05:05 PM

Thanks for the reply Bill, and I wouldn't expect you to support or endorse your app being run like this, anymore than like I'm doing running it on Win 10 in Bluestacks.  But since I wouldn't require scope control from a Chromebook (if any consistently run Play store apps reliably after updates) this would be a great inexpensive option for a desktop/coffee table reference guide.


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#98 ccs_hello

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 09:23 AM

My 2 cents...

 

Chromebook (a different type of hardware)  is running Google Chrome OS, which is different than a regular Android device (tablet or smartphone) running Android OS.

I have yet seeing an official statement from Chrome OS folks on the (full) compatibility.

Yes, it is a noble goal indeed.  But where are we at this point?


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#99 btschumy

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 10:30 AM

Scrolling up in this thread, I just noticed post #90 from JazzyOldMan.  He seems to have ben able to connect to a Celestron Wi-Fi mount after changing the name server used by Chrome.

 

I also have received another email from a customer that says SkySafari on Chromebook works fine with AsiAir.  Although I haven't heard confirmation, I would assume it would also work with SkyFi.  This may be something unusual about the Celestron Wi-Fi hardware.



#100 halx

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:41 AM

My 2 cents...

 

Chromebook (a different type of hardware)  is running Google Chrome OS, which is different than a regular Android device (tablet or smartphone) running Android OS.

I have yet seeing an official statement from Chrome OS folks on the (full) compatibility.

Yes, it is a noble goal indeed.  But where are we at this point?

It's actually not the Google to blame, but device manufacturers. The current state is: select Chromebooks provide selective support for a selection of compatible Android apps. https://www.androida...id-apps-874984/




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