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#51 CHASLX200

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 06:55 PM

Not many people want these big clunkers these days. My days are over dealing with big scopes.


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#52 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 07:12 PM

Not many people want these big clunkers these days. My days are over dealing with big scopes.

 

I'm not sure the San Diego Scope City sold any of those big Newts.  I think they just sat there taking up space.  We moved there in 1999, they were obsolete by then.  

 

Jon



#53 CHASLX200

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 07:17 PM

 

Not many people want these big clunkers these days. My days are over dealing with big scopes.

 

I'm not sure the San Diego Scope City sold any of those big Newts.  I think they just sat there taking up space.  We moved there in 1999, they were obsolete by then.  

 

Jon

 

I would love that Parks 16" on that 2.5" mount if i could roll it out and or have a building for it.  Just no way one person is gonna lift that OTA to mount up.



#54 starman876

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 08:14 PM

I used to lift the meade 16" starfinder tube onto the mount. Was not easy, but I did it.  Was a lot younger then.  Still glad I can lift the C14 onto the mount.


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#55 CHASLX200

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 08:19 PM

I used to lift the meade 16" starfinder tube onto the mount. Was not easy, but I did it.  Was a lot younger then.  Still glad I can lift the C14 onto the mount.

Lifting the tube is one thing but try lifting a 200lb OTA high enough to line up them ring mount  studs in them small holes. That is the killer miller.


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#56 starman876

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 09:40 PM

The meade was mounted with two studs. What a pain that was to line up.  That 1/2 thick sonotube   weighed a ton.   If you think that is heavy try lifting a 250 lb dumbell.   When I used to work out that is what I would press.  Wish I could still do that.   However, it sure made playing with those big scopes easy.  


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#57 Terra Nova

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 10:54 PM

I used to lift the meade 16" starfinder tube onto the mount. Was not easy, but I did it.  Was a lot younger then.  Still glad I can lift the C14 onto the mount.

Just keep eatin’ that spinach J!



#58 CHASLX200

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 06:10 AM

Once you get into tube diameters of 14" or bigger then it hard to grab them and lift them up. 



#59 rolo

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 07:41 AM

With a garage and a driveway a big newt is a piece of cake.

 

http://www.scopebugg...gen3sb00129.jpg


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#60 starman876

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 09:30 AM

it does make life easier.



#61 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 09:40 AM

With a garage and a driveway a big newt is a piece of cake.

 

http://www.scopebugg...gen3sb00129.jpg

 

Not really..  That scope lacked rotating rings which makes actually using it just no fun at all..  And then there's the need for a ladder.. And then the wobble factor..  Those mounts and that OTA..  Wobble-wobble.. 

 

Jon



#62 Terra Nova

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 09:48 AM

That’s the deal! Those big boys really deserve to go out in the country and get under dark skies if you ask me. They also need stable air and great seeing, which for me means travel. Under the urban light dome and jet stream where I live, it would not be practical, even if I could roll it out of a garage and onto a flat driveway. I have no garage but I do have a 3 car  nice smooth new concrete driveway. But it also has a pretty good slope to it and has a perfect view of the corner streetlight a hundred feet away. I’ll stick with my smaller scopes thank you. :)


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#63 starman876

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 10:12 AM

that is the problem with these large scopes.  you first need a place to set it up and use it and then you need perfect skies.   between the hassle of getting it in place and then finding the perfect viewing site it may get used once a year.  just not worth it.   a 6-7 inch refractor is max for being able to set it up and having enough aperture.   however, these ultra light dobs are really starting to look appealing.   a 16" scope under a 100 lbs.  i mught just go for one of those soon.


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#64 deSitter

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 10:20 AM

that is the problem with these large scopes.  you first need a place to set it up and use it and then you need perfect skies.   between the hassle of getting it in place and then finding the perfect viewing site it may get used once a year.  just not worth it.   a 6-7 inch refractor is max for being able to set it up and having enough aperture.   however, these ultra light dobs are really starting to look appealing.   a 16" scope under a 100 lbs.  i mught just go for one of those soon.

My 10" f/4.5 on an LXD650 is perfectly portable.

 

-drl


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#65 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 10:24 AM

that is the problem with these large scopes.  you first need a place to set it up and use it and then you need perfect skies.   between the hassle of getting it in place and then finding the perfect viewing site it may get used once a year.  just not worth it.   a 6-7 inch refractor is max for being able to set it up and having enough aperture.   however, these ultra light dobs are really starting to look appealing.   a 16" scope under a 100 lbs.  i mught just go for one of those soon.

 

In my mind , it not just the setup hassle,  it's the observing hassle..PITA..  Lots of these scopes were converted into Dobs.  My 16 inch started out as a Starfinder Dob and I converted it to a Dobstuff with a kit.  Totally assembled with the finders and sliding counterweight in place,  it weighs 107 lbs . The mirror box with the mirror is about 50 lbs.. 

 

It's my travel Dob

 
Joshua Tree March 2017 1.jpg
 
Jon

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#66 starman876

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 10:45 AM

 

that is the problem with these large scopes.  you first need a place to set it up and use it and then you need perfect skies.   between the hassle of getting it in place and then finding the perfect viewing site it may get used once a year.  just not worth it.   a 6-7 inch refractor is max for being able to set it up and having enough aperture.   however, these ultra light dobs are really starting to look appealing.   a 16" scope under a 100 lbs.  i mught just go for one of those soon.

My 10" f/4.5 on an LXD650 is perfectly portable.

 

-drl

 

A 10" newt is a really a small scope compared to the larger scope.  I hade the 16" starfinder and the 10" starfinder at the same time.  The 10" looked so small compared to the 16" when they were standing next to each other. 


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#67 rolo

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 11:04 AM

 

With a garage and a driveway a big newt is a piece of cake.

 

http://www.scopebugg...gen3sb00129.jpg

 

Not really..  That scope lacked rotating rings which makes actually using it just no fun at all..  And then there's the need for a ladder.. And then the wobble factor..  Those mounts and that OTA..  Wobble-wobble.. 

 

Jon

 

Not really, my Cave and most older newts have smooth rotating rings. Also, no need for a latter here unlike the larger Dobs. And then the assembling factor, collimating every trip to a dark site, pushing it around unless you have tracking platform that only last a couple of hours and have to reset it (pita).


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#68 rolo

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 11:13 AM

That’s the deal! Those big boys really deserve to go out in the country and get under dark skies if you ask me. They also need stable air and great seeing, which for me means travel. Under the urban light dome and jet stream where I live, it would not be practical, even if I could roll it out of a garage and onto a flat driveway. I have no garage but I do have a 3 car  nice smooth new concrete driveway. But it also has a pretty good slope to it and has a perfect view of the corner streetlight a hundred feet away. I’ll stick with my smaller scopes thank you. smile.gif

Indeed, each case is different and we should take advantage or make the best of our situation. Each location has its benefits and hassles. My friend has an observatory but would love a garage and driveway for his other scopes, I have a garage and driveway but would like an observatory for CCD imaging. 


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#69 Terra Nova

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 11:13 AM

 

 

that is the problem with these large scopes.  you first need a place to set it up and use it and then you need perfect skies.   between the hassle of getting it in place and then finding the perfect viewing site it may get used once a year.  just not worth it.   a 6-7 inch refractor is max for being able to set it up and having enough aperture.   however, these ultra light dobs are really starting to look appealing.   a 16" scope under a 100 lbs.  i mught just go for one of those soon.

My 10" f/4.5 on an LXD650 is perfectly portable.

 

-drl

 

A 10" newt is a really a small scope compared to the larger scope.  I hade the 16" starfinder and the 10" starfinder at the same time.  The 10" looked so small compared to the 16" when they were standing next to each other. 

 

I have wrestled with the idea of a 10” or 12” collapsing ultra-light dob for some time. Everytime I talk myself out of it and then, after a while, the idea comes back! Maybe one of these days...... ;)


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#70 rolo

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 11:31 AM

that is the problem with these large scopes.  you first need a place to set it up and use it and then you need perfect skies.   between the hassle of getting it in place and then finding the perfect viewing site it may get used once a year.  just not worth it.   a 6-7 inch refractor is max for being able to set it up and having enough aperture.   however, these ultra light dobs are really starting to look appealing.   a 16" scope under a 100 lbs.  i mught just go for one of those soon.

I agree, but most of us don't  go to a dark site alone so with one friend you can bring a big newt or large 18" plus Dobs. For me, the ideal Dob would a 12.5" Zambuto. Anything larger and I'll just look through the other guys 20"-30" Dobs with forklift latters onsite. Also a 6-7" refractor does take some effort to set up but from a dark site with a go-to they are amazing and show more than expected. 


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#71 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 11:57 AM

 

 

With a garage and a driveway a big newt is a piece of cake.

 

http://www.scopebugg...gen3sb00129.jpg

 

Not really..  That scope lacked rotating rings which makes actually using it just no fun at all..  And then there's the need for a ladder.. And then the wobble factor..  Those mounts and that OTA..  Wobble-wobble.. 

 

Jon

 

Not really, my Cave and most older newts have smooth rotating rings. Also, no need for a latter here unlike the larger Dobs. And then the assembling factor, collimating every trip to a dark site, pushing it around unless you have tracking platform that only last a couple of hours and have to reset it (pita).

 

Humm..  That's not how it worked for me..  A few random comments:

 

- The scope in the photo did not rotating rings.. 

 

My 12.5 inch Meade RG required a ladder. 

 

6060082-Meade Winter in San Diego.jpg

 

My 16 inch Dob  does not.  The 16 inch in the linked photo would require a ladder.. My 22 inch and the 25 inch I had required ladders..  A 22 inch on a GEM would require a ladder..  There are 22 inch Dobs that don't.. 

 

- I'm not sure which equatorial platforms you've used..  It takes about 5 seconds to reset my Tom O platform..  It weighs 29 pounds and handles scopes up to 18 inches.  An eq mount for an 18 inch that can be carried with one hand.. When I acquired the EQ platform with quartz controlled dual axis drives,  I was finished with GEMs.. 

 

Assembling factor: The 12.5 inch Meade RG weighed more than my 25 inch Obsession.  The Meade with its heavy OTA really required 2 people to setup.  I did the 25 inch alone..  The 22 inch is an easy one man setup..  

 

Bottom line:  By today's standards, large aperture equatorially mounted Newtonians have always been rare.  In the 70s,  a 12.5 inch was considered large..  Today..  Many consider a 16 inch medium sized.  I consider it large.. 

 

:shrug:

 

Jon



#72 tim53

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 12:25 PM

 

That’s the deal! Those big boys really deserve to go out in the country and get under dark skies if you ask me. They also need stable air and great seeing, which for me means travel. Under the urban light dome and jet stream where I live, it would not be practical, even if I could roll it out of a garage and onto a flat driveway. I have no garage but I do have a 3 car  nice smooth new concrete driveway. But it also has a pretty good slope to it and has a perfect view of the corner streetlight a hundred feet away. I’ll stick with my smaller scopes thank you. smile.gif

Indeed, each case is different and we should take advantage or make the best of our situation. Each location has its benefits and hassles. My friend has an observatory but would love a garage and driveway for his other scopes, I have a garage and driveway but would like an observatory for CCD imaging. 

 

I have a garage and driveway for the Cave 12.5", and I'm building an observatory at Cosmic Acres for ccd imaging.  I live in a white zone, which is for loading and unloading of passengers only, not for astrophotography, but since I do planetary imaging, I don't worry.  The bright sky makes it easy to find my eyepieces and cameras in the "dark."

 

GEM-mounted Newts on wheels are the bee's knees.  Nothing under about 16" aperture should be allowed on a dobsonian mount.step.gif

 

-Tim.

 

-Tim.


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#73 tim53

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 12:30 PM

For objects not far from the celestial equator and not near the zenith (like morning and evening planets), you can do this with many Newts.  And it's especially nice with large ones:

 

post-6788-0-66153200-1407716736_thumb.jp


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#74 Terra Nova

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 12:41 PM

 

 

That’s the deal! Those big boys really deserve to go out in the country and get under dark skies if you ask me. They also need stable air and great seeing, which for me means travel. Under the urban light dome and jet stream where I live, it would not be practical, even if I could roll it out of a garage and onto a flat driveway. I have no garage but I do have a 3 car  nice smooth new concrete driveway. But it also has a pretty good slope to it and has a perfect view of the corner streetlight a hundred feet away. I’ll stick with my smaller scopes thank you. smile.gif

Indeed, each case is different and we should take advantage or make the best of our situation. Each location has its benefits and hassles. My friend has an observatory but would love a garage and driveway for his other scopes, I have a garage and driveway but would like an observatory for CCD imaging. 

 

I have a garage and driveway for the Cave 12.5", and I'm building an observatory at Cosmic Acres for ccd imaging.  I live in a white zone, which is for loading and unloading of passengers only, not for astrophotography, but since I do planetary imaging, I don't worry.  The bright sky makes it easy to find my eyepieces and cameras in the "dark."

 

GEM-mounted Newts on wheels are the bee's knees.  Nothing under about 16" aperture should be allowed on a dobsonian mount.step.gif

 

-Tim.

 

-Tim.

`

Easy for you to say Tim, you have a truck with an attached crain! :lol:


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#75 Garyth64

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 12:50 PM

For objects not far from the celestial equator and not near the zenith (like morning and evening planets), you can do this with many Newts.  And it's especially nice with large ones:

 

post-6788-0-66153200-1407716736_thumb.jp

You mean like this:

 

10 on RG mount b.jpg

10" f/7, homemade, not a Cave


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