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Any Recommendations for QHY695A/IC695A filters?

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#1 Flashfire2205

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 05:38 PM

I am new to CCD cameras,  but I think I am going to get a QHY695A/IC695A what filters would you recommend that I have for AP that don't cost a fortune. I have a Celestron 11in EdgeHD which I have used a DSLR on before. And I do planetary AP but mainly DSO.

 

Any help would be appreciated.



#2 bobzeq25

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 07:23 PM

If you're not going to narrowband (is that a "fortune"?), you'll need a set of LRGB filters.

 

Astrodons are the best.  You always pay a price premium for the best.

 

I get Astronomiks, which I think are the second best.  Always cheaper.

 

A set of their recent deep sky RGB filters will run about $300.  You can pair them with one of three L filters, depending on your exact situation, a little less than $100 more.

 

https://optcorp.com/...et-1-25-dlrgb-1

 

http://www.astronomi...3.html?size=135

 

There are lots of cheaper LRGB, I don't think they are up to the quality of the camera.  Astrodons are an obvious alternative.


Edited by bobzeq25, 12 December 2017 - 07:25 PM.


#3 Flashfire2205

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 10:19 PM

If you're not going to narrowband (is that a "fortune"?), you'll need a set of LRGB filters.

 

Astrodons are the best.  You always pay a price premium for the best.

 

I get Astronomiks, which I think are the second best.  Always cheaper.

 

A set of their recent deep sky RGB filters will run about $300.  You can pair them with one of three L filters, depending on your exact situation, a little less than $100 more.

 

https://optcorp.com/...et-1-25-dlrgb-1

 

http://www.astronomi...3.html?size=135

 

There are lots of cheaper LRGB, I don't think they are up to the quality of the camera.  Astrodons are an obvious alternative.

Thank you, being that I am new to the CDD camera business I don't know to much about this topic. What I meant by a fortune was something over $500 for the filters. I was looking at the link below, would that be a good choice or is their something better for under the $500 mark?

 

https://www.highpoin...BSABEgKMh_D_BwE



#4 bobzeq25

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 10:53 AM

 

If you're not going to narrowband (is that a "fortune"?), you'll need a set of LRGB filters.

 

Astrodons are the best.  You always pay a price premium for the best.

 

I get Astronomiks, which I think are the second best.  Always cheaper.

 

A set of their recent deep sky RGB filters will run about $300.  You can pair them with one of three L filters, depending on your exact situation, a little less than $100 more.

 

https://optcorp.com/...et-1-25-dlrgb-1

 

http://www.astronomi...3.html?size=135

 

There are lots of cheaper LRGB, I don't think they are up to the quality of the camera.  Astrodons are an obvious alternative.

Thank you, being that I am new to the CDD camera business I don't know to much about this topic. What I meant by a fortune was something over $500 for the filters. I was looking at the link below, would that be a good choice or is their something better for under the $500 mark?

 

https://www.highpoin...BSABEgKMh_D_BwE

 

They're an alternative, I like the Astronomiks better, for a little less than $400 for a set of LRGB.  The big difference is that the Astronomiks cut off a bit sooner as you go to deep blue, I think that's an advantage, "blue bloat" is a common problem.  Close call, just a personal preference.  Minor point, you don't need a clear, nor is it useful.

 

The language in the ad is flowery, I believe the Astronomiks have at least the same quality of design (as described above, I think it's superior) and manufacture.


Edited by bobzeq25, 13 December 2017 - 11:01 AM.


#5 Flashfire2205

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 05:31 PM

 

 

Thank you, being that I am new to the CDD camera business I don't know to much about this topic. What I meant by a fortune was something over $500 for the filters. I was looking at the link below, would that be a good choice or is their something better for under the $500 mark?

 

 

 

https://www.highpoin...BSABEgKMh_D_BwE

 

They're an alternative, I like the Astronomiks better, for a little less than $400 for a set of LRGB.  The big difference is that the Astronomiks cut off a bit sooner as you go to deep blue, I think that's an advantage, "blue bloat" is a common problem.  Close call, just a personal preference.  Minor point, you don't need a clear, nor is it useful.

 

The language in the ad is flowery, I believe the Astronomiks have at least the same quality of design (as described above, I think it's superior) and manufacture.

 

So would this filter set produce better images then the LRGBC filter set I said before. 

 

https://telescopes.n...AiABEgI5G_D_BwE at least the version in the 1.25in size.

 



#6 bobzeq25

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 07:44 PM

 

 

 

Thank you, being that I am new to the CDD camera business I don't know to much about this topic. What I meant by a fortune was something over $500 for the filters. I was looking at the link below, would that be a good choice or is their something better for under the $500 mark?

 

 

 

https://www.highpoin...BSABEgKMh_D_BwE

 

They're an alternative, I like the Astronomiks better, for a little less than $400 for a set of LRGB.  The big difference is that the Astronomiks cut off a bit sooner as you go to deep blue, I think that's an advantage, "blue bloat" is a common problem.  Close call, just a personal preference.  Minor point, you don't need a clear, nor is it useful.

 

The language in the ad is flowery, I believe the Astronomiks have at least the same quality of design (as described above, I think it's superior) and manufacture.

 

So would this filter set produce better images then the LRGBC filter set I said before. 

 

https://telescopes.n...AiABEgI5G_D_BwE at least the version in the 1.25in size.

 

 

Those are the old Astronomiks.  My recommendation is for the new model labeled "Deep Sky" as referenced above.  RGB and a choice for L, depending on your setup.  Those are the ones I like the design of, not the old ones.

 

And, unless your scope needs the 36mm unmounted, the 1.25 mounted are likely cheaper than the 36 unmounted.  You need to be very careful your filter wheel matches up with your filters.


Edited by bobzeq25, 13 December 2017 - 07:46 PM.


#7 Flashfire2205

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 03:55 PM

 

 

 

 

Thank you, being that I am new to the CDD camera business I don't know to much about this topic. What I meant by a fortune was something over $500 for the filters. I was looking at the link below, would that be a good choice or is their something better for under the $500 mark?

 

 

 

https://www.highpoin...BSABEgKMh_D_BwE

 

They're an alternative, I like the Astronomiks better, for a little less than $400 for a set of LRGB.  The big difference is that the Astronomiks cut off a bit sooner as you go to deep blue, I think that's an advantage, "blue bloat" is a common problem.  Close call, just a personal preference.  Minor point, you don't need a clear, nor is it useful.

 

The language in the ad is flowery, I believe the Astronomiks have at least the same quality of design (as described above, I think it's superior) and manufacture.

 

So would this filter set produce better images then the LRGBC filter set I said before. 

 

https://telescopes.n...AiABEgI5G_D_BwE at least the version in the 1.25in size.

 

 

Those are the old Astronomiks.  My recommendation is for the new model labeled "Deep Sky" as referenced above.  RGB and a choice for L, depending on your setup.  Those are the ones I like the design of, not the old ones.

 

And, unless your scope needs the 36mm unmounted, the 1.25 mounted are likely cheaper than the 36 unmounted.  You need to be very careful your filter wheel matches up with your filters.

 

I cant seem to find any LRGB deep sky products only RGB, do you have to buy the L filter from a different manufacturer?



#8 bobzeq25

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 06:35 PM

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you, being that I am new to the CDD camera business I don't know to much about this topic. What I meant by a fortune was something over $500 for the filters. I was looking at the link below, would that be a good choice or is their something better for under the $500 mark?

 

 

 

https://www.highpoin...BSABEgKMh_D_BwE

 

They're an alternative, I like the Astronomiks better, for a little less than $400 for a set of LRGB.  The big difference is that the Astronomiks cut off a bit sooner as you go to deep blue, I think that's an advantage, "blue bloat" is a common problem.  Close call, just a personal preference.  Minor point, you don't need a clear, nor is it useful.

 

The language in the ad is flowery, I believe the Astronomiks have at least the same quality of design (as described above, I think it's superior) and manufacture.

 

So would this filter set produce better images then the LRGBC filter set I said before. 

 

https://telescopes.n...AiABEgI5G_D_BwE at least the version in the 1.25in size.

 

 

Those are the old Astronomiks.  My recommendation is for the new model labeled "Deep Sky" as referenced above.  RGB and a choice for L, depending on your setup.  Those are the ones I like the design of, not the old ones.

 

And, unless your scope needs the 36mm unmounted, the 1.25 mounted are likely cheaper than the 36 unmounted.  You need to be very careful your filter wheel matches up with your filters.

 

I cant seem to find any LRGB deep sky products only RGB, do you have to buy the L filter from a different manufacturer?

 

You could order the L from astronomik directly (I've done that), the website is in post #2.  OPT appears to carry the L-1, I would guess they sell the L-2 and L-3 also, a call would be in order.  Ditto high point scientific.



#9 Flashfire2205

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 06:47 PM

You could order the L from astronomik directly (I've done that), the website is in post #2.  OPT appears to carry the L-1, I would guess they sell the L-2 and L-3 also, a call would be in order.  Ditto high point scientifc

 

 

 

What about narrow band filter would those be better for imaging both DSO and planetary targets or are they only meant for DSO?



#10 bobzeq25

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 08:46 PM

 

You could order the L from astronomik directly (I've done that), the website is in post #2.  OPT appears to carry the L-1, I would guess they sell the L-2 and L-3 also, a call would be in order.  Ditto high point scientifc

 

 

 

What about narrow band filter would those be better for imaging both DSO and planetary targets or are they only meant for DSO?

 

Narrowband is specific to certain DSOs.  They need to be low density nebulae.  Those emit very sharp frequencies of light, denser targets like galaxies smear it out, although they contain less nebula which emit some narrowband.  A small fraction of the total image.  Clusters emit virtually none.  Ditto planets.

 

I, and many others, like it, but it's quite specific to certain targets.  And the narrowband filters are more expensive, they have to be in order to be, well, narrow.  <smile>  Instead of maybe $100 each for a good one, we're talking $200-300 (higher for very narrow Astrodons).


Edited by bobzeq25, 14 December 2017 - 08:48 PM.


#11 TimN

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 09:13 PM

Bob - I believe both Astronomiks and Baader filters were upgraded fairly recently (1-2 years ago?) so there is currently little difference between them - at least the recent ones. So, I don't think it matters which ones the OP gets. 



#12 Flashfire2205

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 11:19 PM

 

 

You could order the L from astronomik directly (I've done that), the website is in post #2.  OPT appears to carry the L-1, I would guess they sell the L-2 and L-3 also, a call would be in order.  Ditto high point scientifc

 

 

 

What about narrow band filter would those be better for imaging both DSO and planetary targets or are they only meant for DSO?

 

Narrowband is specific to certain DSOs.  They need to be low density nebulae.  Those emit very sharp frequencies of light, denser targets like galaxies smear it out, although they contain less nebula which emit some narrowband.  A small fraction of the total image.  Clusters emit virtually none.  Ditto planets.

 

I, and many others, like it, but it's quite specific to certain targets.  And the narrowband filters are more expensive, they have to be in order to be, well, narrow.  <smile>  Instead of maybe $100 each for a good one, we're talking $200-300 (higher for very narrow Astrodons).

 

Before I make any purchase the Deep Sky filter product line can take good planetary images right (so the name is just for marketing purposes) and also why do companies sell LRGBC filter sets if the clear filter wont do anything?



#13 bobzeq25

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 01:00 AM

 

 

 

You could order the L from astronomik directly (I've done that), the website is in post #2.  OPT appears to carry the L-1, I would guess they sell the L-2 and L-3 also, a call would be in order.  Ditto high point scientifc

 

 

 

What about narrow band filter would those be better for imaging both DSO and planetary targets or are they only meant for DSO?

 

Narrowband is specific to certain DSOs.  They need to be low density nebulae.  Those emit very sharp frequencies of light, denser targets like galaxies smear it out, although they contain less nebula which emit some narrowband.  A small fraction of the total image.  Clusters emit virtually none.  Ditto planets.

 

I, and many others, like it, but it's quite specific to certain targets.  And the narrowband filters are more expensive, they have to be in order to be, well, narrow.  <smile>  Instead of maybe $100 each for a good one, we're talking $200-300 (higher for very narrow Astrodons).

 

Before I make any purchase the Deep Sky filter product line can take good planetary images right (so the name is just for marketing purposes) and also why do companies sell LRGBC filter sets if the clear filter wont do anything?

 

1.  Can't see why the deep sky wouldn't work for planets, but I can't be totally sure.  You could email Astronomik and ask, or ask on the Solar System Imaging forum.

 

2.  Beats me.  I don't ever use one, haven't ever seen anyone use one.

 

"All color filters block near-infrared wavelengths to keep them from interfering with the signal. The L filter also must block the near-IR so that when you combine the L with the RGB, you don’t get unsupported signal. In other words, if your RGB filters block the IR, but the L doesn’t, there will be no color data to support the IR, and the IR data the L lets through will show up as an ugly gray in the picture."

 

http://www.astronomy...in-lrgb-filters


Edited by bobzeq25, 15 December 2017 - 01:09 AM.



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