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What did you see last night in your binoculars? (Part 2)

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#626 junomike

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Posted 15 September 2018 - 09:09 AM

Got out a few nights ago for a few hours (APM 100's 45°).

Best view was IC4756 (and surroundings).



#627 Thomas Marshall

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Posted 16 September 2018 - 04:59 AM

Follow up on Comet search near M35, with 15x70mm binoc's.  Nope, still could not make ID. M15 looked good though, and much of the same stuff of previous night.    



#628 Astroman007

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Posted 16 September 2018 - 11:24 AM

Follow up on Comet search near M35, with 15x70mm binoc's.  Nope, still could not make ID. M15 looked good though, and much of the same stuff of previous night.    

Perhaps a little more aperture may make that much needed difference? Have you tried your 25x100s?



#629 Thomas Marshall

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Posted 16 September 2018 - 04:46 PM

Perhaps a little more aperture may make that much needed difference? Have you tried your 25x100s?

Yeah, - I mulled it over last night whether to go get the Tachyons or one of my refractors, - but took the light duty approach as I've had a eventful week. I have one of those Peterson "Plumbing" mounts for the 25x100's, but it is partly disassembled in the car and was not up to that. Still, for quick session I could have put them on my camera tripod and gotten a good enough look. My 80mm Master Birder is very light, and takes power pretty good, and is very nice with star image and colors, so that might go out with me also on next session. Also got a new backbrace yesterday, so that might make things easier.


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#630 jcj380

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Posted 17 September 2018 - 07:22 AM

A little pre-dawn Saturday.  Too close to sunrise to pull out my scope.  M35, 36, 37, 42, Pleaides, Hyades.  Oddly enough, couldn't find M38 in the LP while 37 was pretty disctinct.



#631 Mr. Bill

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Posted 17 September 2018 - 10:10 AM

Swept this up last night with 100mm + 12.5mm Morpheus (44x)......barely picked it up against background starfield (11-13th mag stars) Faint and appears at first as a slight condensation of background stars; averted vision shows as a circular patch.

 

https://dso-browser....91/open-cluster.

 

Not even shown on Sky Atlas 2000; used Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas to identify.

 

My technique is to sweep overlapping fields and then look up objects of interest that I don't recognize; that is why a flat field is essential to prevent rolling ball effect.

 

Also it is the best method of detecting contrast changes and viewing the mosaic of starfields, faint emission and dark nebulae and voids in the MW.

 

Found that eye relief is perfect on the 12.5mms using extender and supplied batwing eyecups instead of screw on eyecups.

 

Don't like batwings so trimmed off.


Edited by Mr. Bill, 17 September 2018 - 10:15 AM.

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#632 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 12:00 PM

I took a break from the telescope and did a bit of binocular observing while I was at the Naylor on Saturday night.  Using 15x70s, I viewed Cr 399 (the Coathanger), Mel 20 (the Alpha Persei Moving Group), Mel 25 (the Hyades), M11 (the Wild Duck Cluster), M31 (the Andromeda Galaxy), M33 (the Triangulum Galaxy), M34, M45 (the Pleiades), NGC 752 and the Golf Putter asterism, NGC 869 and NGC 884 (the Double Cluster), and NGC 7789 (Caroline's Rose).


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#633 Mr. Bill

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 12:19 PM

Another good clear night (SQM 21.4) using the 100s + 24mm UFFs (23x) wandering through Cygnus, Lacerta, Cepheus, and Cassiopeia.

 

Spent one night at 32x with 17.5mm Morph, one night at 44x with 12.5mm Morph and last night with the 24mms; amazing how changing magnifications and therefore image scales give completely different contexts of the same fields of view when viewing extended objects such as the NA Nebula and the area around Gamma Cass and the Windsock.

 

This is where BT binoculars really show their versatility.......like having many different fixed magnification binoculars rolled into one with the plus of angled oculars.


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#634 treadmarks

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 08:02 PM

Like a lot of people I've been looking at the Pleiades a lot lately. It's amazing how, even with my devastating light pollution, it can still look good and interesting. I've been finding myself preferring the view in my 15x63's to my refractor. Not sure if a 2" EP would put it on an even footing.

 

 

I took a break from the telescope and did a bit of binocular observing while I was at the Naylor on Saturday night.  Using 15x70s, I viewed Cr 399 (the Coathanger), Mel 20 (the Alpha Persei Moving Group), Mel 25 (the Hyades), M11 (the Wild Duck Cluster), M31 (the Andromeda Galaxy), M33 (the Triangulum Galaxy), M34, M45 (the Pleiades), NGC 752 and the Golf Putter asterism, NGC 869 and NGC 884 (the Double Cluster), and NGC 7789 (Caroline's Rose).

Never looked at Alpha Persei but it just recently popped up on my radar screen via dso-browser.com. Looks similar to Pleiades with lots of bright stars over a wide arc. Definitely going to try and check it out this fall/winter.


Edited by treadmarks, 18 September 2018 - 08:03 PM.


#635 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 03:50 PM

Using 15x70s, I viewed Cr 65, Cr 69, Cr 70, Mel 20, Mel 25, M31, M33, M34, M35, M36, M37, M38, M42, M45, NGC 1981, and NGC 7789 last night from the Naylor Observatory while taking breaks from telescopic observing.

 

Dave Mitsky


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#636 Astroman007

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 07:03 PM

Never looked at Alpha Persei but it just recently popped up on my radar screen via dso-browser.com. Looks similar to Pleiades with lots of bright stars over a wide arc. Definitely going to try and check it out this fall/winter.

Oh, do so! You will certainly not regret it!



#637 dd61999

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 09:33 PM

Well I’m fairly new to all this.  But I came across the Alpha_Persei_Cluster.  Is it me, but I think it’s prettier then the Pleiades 


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#638 duck2k

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Posted 21 September 2018 - 01:55 AM

I got out to the driveway tonight.  A lot of my neighbors now keep there lights low or off.  I do not have to say anything - they know (just look for the crazy man on the driveway behind his binos).

 

Tonight I took out my Obie 25x100, EZ Binoc mount, and gravity chair for some sweeping.  Despite the Moon, I managed to see some of the great objects.  I forgot the view through these binos - very similar to using the APM 100 with the APM 24mm UFF (operative word ‘similar’ not exact). I forgot how fun these binos are, and how relaxing the grav chair can be over the Astro Chair.  This made for a comfortable casual night.

 

Swept through a few targets in Sagittarius Ptolemy, Butterfly Clusters.  Swung up to Lagoon and Trifid; Saturn being close to these. Saw Titan, and resolved the ring.  Had to stop to admire M24 for awhile.  I was kicked back in the chair - king of the driveway.

 

Shifted gears and got busy in Cassiopeia by locating Caroline’s Rose.  I always enjoy this object, especially in the APM’s. I did work my way down to the Owl Cluster (another favorite).  Checking Sky Safari, I decided to take a crack at IC 1805 (Heart), and IC 1848 (Soul) Nebulas.  I was able to see some “murky” areas around the star groupings.  I might try looking at them again with the APM’s.  I have seen these beautiful nebulas in friend’s Dob many times at star parties.

 

One of the things I like when going to M31, are the “gateway” stars that lead to it.  I actually find them fascinating.  Nu Andromedea, HD 4685, and HD 4669.

 

I shifted gears again, and spent the rest of the session observing Alpha Persei (Mirfak) in Mel 20.  Closed out with my fave Double Cluster.  Packed up and called it a night.  First home session to ever last over an hour in a long time.  Loved it.:watching:


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#639 Beg

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Posted Today, 02:31 AM

Took out the Oberwerk 100XL ED and the APM 18 UFF under a full moon tonight. The APM's are excellent in the Obie. Plenty of focus range and they fit ubetcha.gif  And they are sooo sharp in the Oberwerks.

Left the phone and Sky Safari in the house and just winged it for open clusters and double stars. 

 

You know, there is actually a lot of things to see under a full moon. Open clusters take on a different look in a brighter sky that is actually quite stunning. Dimmer stars get washed out so clusters take on a certain form and shape, if that makes sense. And the star colors are stunning. 

 

Started at Lyra. Dialed in my focus on Vega and arced across the sky to Taurus for 2 hours. Viewing familiar open clusters and picking out new ones. Saw two very interesting double stars side by side near Lyra with the same orientation. Looked them up when I got inside and I believe they are HR7272 and HD178849. Mag 6.7 and 7.1 Both in the same FOV made a very pretty view that I lingered on. Finished off viewing the full moon with excellent detail.

 

As the binos reached thermal equilibrium in the cool temps, the sharpness and star colors that only an APO can really bring, made for one of my more enjoyable nights of perspective viewing that I have had for a while.




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