Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Moonlite CSL with SCT focal reducer

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 brian1052

brian1052

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 131
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2015
  • Loc: Mississippi

Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:43 PM

Ok I sent a question to moonlite but I'm sure it will be next week before I hear back so maybe somebody here can help. Got my new Moonlite CSL in today. I installed my meade .63 focal reducer into the slider and mounted it on the scope. I've read all the paperwork they sent and run a dozen different worded Google searches. I don't know how you figure out what your back spacing will be from focal reducer to end of drawtube. Its a one inch travel drawtube but the focal reducer slides inside and then can be moved .8 inches back and forth. So anybody have one of these and can tell me where the focal reducer sits when its all the way forward or back? 



#2 Ron359

Ron359

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 823
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2008
  • Loc: -105 +39

Posted 05 January 2018 - 06:06 PM

I tried using one of those and found that because its at the end of the focuser tube it doesn't come close in any position to the proper spacing needed between the .63 SCT FR/FF and DSLR camera focal plane.  I emailed (several times) Moonlite with questions about the spacing and never got an answer or even a reply.   I sold the focuser and went back to using a JMI focuser that came with the scope.  Its not as 'pretty' but its also much lighter, so much easier to balance.  



#3 brian1052

brian1052

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 131
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2015
  • Loc: Mississippi

Posted 05 January 2018 - 09:47 PM

Well thats not good. I deforked and didnt have another focuser so I just spent 450 bucks on this one. I cant believe they dont get that question on every one of these they sell.



#4 Bill Dean

Bill Dean

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 527
  • Joined: 05 Sep 2005
  • Loc: Encinitas, CA

Posted 05 January 2018 - 10:30 PM

Why not just measure the distance yourself? Take a cotton swab, whatever, insert it from the rear of the draw tube until it touches the reducer and mark where it's flush with the end of the draw tube. Measure. Go wild and repeat, once at each end of adjustment range.

Clear skies,
Bill

#5 MHamburg

MHamburg

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1628
  • Joined: 21 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Brooklyn, NY/Berkshires, MA

Posted 06 January 2018 - 12:21 PM

Have faith in Ron at Moonlite. He has always been very supportive. He might be away.

 

Michael



#6 carolinaskies

carolinaskies

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 585
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2014
  • Loc: Greenville SC

Posted 06 January 2018 - 11:21 PM

Ok I sent a question to moonlite but I'm sure it will be next week before I hear back so maybe somebody here can help. Got my new Moonlite CSL in today. I installed my meade .63 focal reducer into the slider and mounted it on the scope. I've read all the paperwork they sent and run a dozen different worded Google searches. I don't know how you figure out what your back spacing will be from focal reducer to end of drawtube. Its a one inch travel drawtube but the focal reducer slides inside and then can be moved .8 inches back and forth. So anybody have one of these and can tell me where the focal reducer sits when its all the way forward or back? 


 


It's likely you'll have to put your system together to find out if you need to fine-tune that distance.  The 1" drawtube is supposed to mimic the Meade external focuser to maintain the same system geometry, but you can fine-tune it 'out' as necessary I believe to compensate for the differing FRs on the market.  




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.







Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics