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RV/Trailer Astronomy Fact and Fiction

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#51 dr.who

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Posted 24 January 2018 - 07:44 PM

That Nash is nice! What does it cost base as pictured?



#52 TL2101

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Posted 24 January 2018 - 08:57 PM

Here is an Oregon dealer that is showing $26,051. I am sure the price is negotiable. The generator or solar panels would be extra. I like those suitcase solar panels that let you park in the shade and put the panels in the sun.

 

https://www.rvtrader...-17K-5001025354


Edited by TL2101, 24 January 2018 - 08:58 PM.


#53 dr.who

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 12:23 AM

Thank you!

#54 edwincjones

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 02:27 PM

sometimes I wonder about the impact of CN threads

 

has this thread changed anyone's decision to either get an RV  or to not get one   question.gif

 

edj


Edited by edwincjones, 26 January 2018 - 02:27 PM.


#55 dr.who

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 03:33 PM

Yes.

#56 CCD-Freak

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 03:48 PM

I have had several RVs over the years and now that I have a molded fiberglass trailer I will never go beck to a "stick built".  My Casita is the most trouble free trailer I have ever owned.  

 

J and M setup.jpg

 

 

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#57 stevenwav

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 04:03 PM

John - Am I right in assuming that a "molded" fiberglass trailer is water tight as opposed to a stick-built type? I have heard that the roofs have a tendency to leak on the larger RV's. 



#58 sg6

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 04:44 PM

I would have said the approach would have been to have the astro equipment at hand when an RV trip enables you to make use of it.

 

There is therefore the option of heading to an organised star party but I read too often of astronomers apparently thinking, or talking, in terms of something like an RV "solely" for astro use. Whereas the reality is I would guess 1 in 5 trips will be astro specific, maybe less.

 

Consider it as an additional use for/with an RV but not a primary.

 

Will say that RV's are not so "common" here as in the US. We do not have the distances to cover that in effect makes them as popular or necessary. Neither do we have the RV sites either. What substitutes for them are camper vans and they are generally smaller so less space for equipment.



#59 davidmcgo

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 05:05 PM

sometimes I wonder about the impact of CN threads

 

has this thread changed anyone's decision to either get an RV  or to not get one   question.gif

 

edj

Not immediately but it has helped me focus my thinking on what I'm really seeking which is very helpful in avoiding an expensive decision that turns out to be not the best solution!

 

Dave


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#60 wrvond

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 06:12 PM

An RV pointer. If there is any chance of rain...particularly if you won't be at the RV when it might rain.

 

Do not put your canopy nearly horizontal. It needs a pretty good slope to it.  Also do not put both out ends at the same level. Put one end at a much lower level than the other.

 

Otherwise its easy for a pond to form on the canopy...once a bit of water stays...the canopy sags in the middle...allowing room for even more water....

 

I've seen a collapsed/ruined canopy or two from that.

This is, for the most part, no longer true. Virtually every camper awning made today has an auto dump function that works very well.



#61 SkyCruzr

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 07:28 PM

sometimes I wonder about the impact of CN threads

 

has this thread changed anyone's decision to either get an RV  or to not get one   question.gif

 

edj

For me, it has changed the type of RV we will get for our next one. I had been toying with getting a class C, but I think that idea is on the back burner for now. Because of this thread.

 

We have had different typed of trailers over the last number of years trying to figure out just what we want. Luckily we have made a few bucks on each of them when we sold them and went on to the next idea. Since we very much enjoy ATV exploring, that adds another wrinkle to our whole travel plan. Our latest trailer is a toy hauler with ALL of the conveniences, down to an on board fuel station for the ATV. Quite comfortable, but also quite heavy. Our trip to NW Wyoming for the the eclipse, we got 9ish mpg. Since we want to do some major trips with the ATV, that isn't entirely optimal. About a year ago we picked up a slide in pop-up camper for the truck, thinking we would just pull the ATV along in its covered trailer. We should have researched a little more as this one has a horrible floor plan. It's going to be sold soon.

 

Since August we have done LOTS of talking about our next 'experiment', and I think we are going to get a regular slide in camper and still let the ATV tag along behind. We will get a camper with powered remote jacks so we can park the camper and have the truck when we are in an area for an extended time. This time we have done a lot more homework and have pretty much settled on a Lance 825. The features we want, 25% the weight of our toy hauler, room for a grab and go kit, and a well built unit. Of course we will track down a gently used one vs new. So we can have good power when in the boonies, we'll stash a small generator in the covered trailer.


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#62 eklf

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 07:38 PM

 

sometimes I wonder about the impact of CN threads

 

has this thread changed anyone's decision to either get an RV  or to not get one   question.gif

 

edj

Not immediately but it has helped me focus my thinking on what I'm really seeking which is very helpful in avoiding an expensive decision that turns out to be not the best solution!

 

Dave

 

+1


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#63 CCD-Freak

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 08:59 PM

John - Am I right in assuming that a "molded" fiberglass trailer is water tight as opposed to a stick-built type? I have heard that the roofs have a tendency to leak on the larger RV's. 

Yes molded fiberglass trailers are made like boats and don't have roof seams which tend to deteriorate over time due to flexing and UV radiation.  My last "stick built" trailer sprung a leak during the winter and when I went out in the spring to get ready for a trip I stepped in and put my foot through the floor.  I was not a "happy camper".  The fiberglass shell also doesn't rot if one did have a leak  around the AC unit or a vent.  The only thing I have had to repair has been a popped rivet which took all of 5 minutes.  The underside of the trailer is also fiberglass so there are hardly any holes for bugs and mice to get in.  There are some really nice "stickies" out there but they do require much more maintenance but I decided I wanted to spend my time and money out camping and imaging.

 

Casitas in Lajitas_Moonlight Manor-sm.JPG

 

Moonlight Manor in the moonlight down in Lajitas, Texas next to Big Bend.

 

John

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Edited by CCD-Freak, 26 January 2018 - 09:06 PM.

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#64 OleCuss

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 09:31 PM

We looked at a Lance before we went with our hybrid travel trailer.  We really liked the idea of driving to the site and unloading the camper.  Put in an intercom and someone can be in the back whilst traveling and that was a plus as well.  The Lances looked to be really good units - well-made and well thought out.  A lot to be said for getting one.

 

What dissuaded us?:

  1. Most important is that neither of us is getting younger and the idea of climbing up and then crawling into the bed was not at all appealing.  Some day it may not even be possible.  Currently possible for both of us but I'm betting that if we'd gotten it my wife would have found the situation sufficiently unpleasant that she would already not go camping in one with me.
  2. Space.  We were quite willing to deal with the relatively cramped living space.  We didn't think it was really too bad.  But we'd have had relatively poor space for bringing astronomy gear.  What really emphasized that for me was when a fellow amateur astronomer wanted to try out the ETX-80 we had because he figured he could actually fit one into his rig along with the stuff they needed for somewhat prolonged travel in their camper.
  3. We would have had to get a different pickup.  That was not what really killed the deal for us but it did factor into things.  We have a short bed and a 1/2-ton pickup and that just wasn't going to work.
  4. Not as easy to set up a nice generous canopy.

What we got was a Rockwood Roo 19.  Being nominally a 19 footer means we can still utilize some of the campsites which require that you be under 20 foot.  It's relatively light (similar to the abovementioned Nash 17) and if you have some kids with you, you could technically sleep 8.  A great plenty of space for my wife and myself.  Set up so that we were able to add a rear camera for ease in backing into places.  Just about every amenity we could want - including a sofa.  Get someone really tall and they can sleep across both the dinette and sofa area.  Price was pretty good as well - we got it for under $20K.

 

Not going to be as quiet as something like that 17' Nash because the hybrid nature means more noise gets in.  Heating and cooling are sabotaged a little as well by the hybrid nature but there are fans designed to help with that and they act as noise blockers as well.  Automated canopy easily set not to collect water.  If you are plugged into external power - the mattresses are heated.

 

I envy the great view through the end of that 17' Nash - our hybrid just cannot come close to that kind of view.  Most of the time we don't have a great view to look at anyway, but every now and again you can be in a place where that nice big window is going to be simply awesome!

 

I think we could really enjoy a nice Class A or C if I could tow a vehicle to run around in.  They tend to be too long for some campsites, however, and they are too long to fit into the space I have for parking next to the house.

 

A 5th wheel trailer and a 3/4-ton diesel to tow it would be similarly awesome in my estimation.  But again I don't have a good place to park one and a lot of them aren't going to be usable in some places we want to "camp".

 

Well, maybe that sorta long explanation of why we eliminated some options and chose what we did will be helpful.

 

I wouldn't even pretend that anyone should choose what we chose.  If I were single I'd probably have chosen quite differently.  If we had no expectation of eventually having grandkids come with us we'd probably have chosen differently.  If we had more space to put the rig and/or a lot more money - maybe different but maybe not because we still want to be able to use the small sites.

 

FWIW



#65 TL2101

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 01:39 AM

Something about seeing a scope next to an RV in the wilderness seems so peaceful. It just looks like such an idyllic scene and one you would want to go back to as often as possible. Seeing John's pictures of the two Casita RV's next to each other is inspiring. That's what I call living. waytogo.gif


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#66 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 02:45 AM

I think we could really enjoy a nice Class A or C if I could tow a vehicle to run around in.  They tend to be too long for some campsites, however, and they are too long to fit into the space I have for parking next to the house.

 

 

In our travels around the southwest, I've never seen a campgound with a 20 foot limit.  If there's a limit, it's 26-27 ft.  

 

Parking at home is an important and potentially expensive issue with any larger trailer or motor home. 

 

Jon



#67 jpbutler

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 02:45 AM

Boy this is really turning out to be a great thread. 

When I bought my used  Forest River RPOD last year I opted for a 5 year warranty that had a $100 deductible per instance. Usually I don't pay for these kind of options, but having had a fishing boat I assumed that travel trailers break alot.

Last thing  I wanted to do was to be 2000 miles away and need repairs to continue the trip. With the policy I bought, you can get repairs on the spot wherever you are and it is covered.

 

On my last trip of the year, the refrigerator broke and I had a cracked weld in the spare tire bracket, which was my fault. I overloaded the bracket with a large cooler. But they still covered it.

 

Anyway I returned the trailer to the dealer and everything was repaired, plus they winterized it for a total of $200.00.

The dealer where I bought the trailer really did me a solid. They insisted I add a load leveler and antisway  bar. Which has made the towing experience a breeze and offered the extended warranty.

 

John

 

PS: those Casitas are really nice. I love the idea of a complete fiberglass shell. Plus they look cool. But, I don't have trailer envy. At $12k for my used 2014, I am quite happy. 


Edited by jpbutler, 27 January 2018 - 02:51 AM.


#68 kennyrichmond

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 06:29 AM

John - Am I right in assuming that a "molded" fiberglass trailer is water tight as opposed to a stick-built type? I have heard that the roofs have a tendency to leak on the larger RV's. 

Steven,  make sure that the roof is seamless - one piece, no matter the width or length or material.



#69 edwincjones

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 07:41 AM

 

I think we could really enjoy a nice Class A or C if I could tow a vehicle to run around in.  They tend to be too long for some campsites, however, and they are too long to fit into the space I have for parking next to the house.

 

 

In our travels around the southwest, I've never seen a campgound with a 20 foot limit.  If there's a limit, it's 26-27 ft.  

 

Parking at home is an important and potentially expensive issue with any larger trailer or motor home. 

 

Jon

 

 

some of the state and national parks have a smaller campground length limit

 

edj



#70 Jim4321

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 07:46 AM

If the Tiger CX (now Bengal; http://www.tigervehicles.com/  ) had had any kind of 'normal' stick-built roof, I wouldn't have even considered it.  The whole roof and upper part of the sides is a one-piece fiberglass  molding.  The lower sidewalls are on a welded aluminum 3/4" square tube frame. The join from roof to aluminum sidewalls is right below the awning.  An annual waxing is all the maintenance it takes, even here in the damp SE mountains.  Yep, I've had minor leaks in 12 years of parking outside, but only little seeps from window gaskets.  They're pretty easy to find, and easily remedied with Captain Tolleys Creeping Crack Cure (yep, a real English marine product). 

al4sjs.jpg

This is on the Blue Ridge Parkway, at our club's event for 'International Observe the Moon Night'.  The smooth aluminum sides hold suction cups very nicely for info displays.

 

Jim H.

 


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#71 edwincjones

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 07:49 AM

I would have said the approach would have been to have the astro equipment at hand when an RV trip enables you to make use of it.

 

There is therefore the option of heading to an organised star party but I read too often of astronomers apparently thinking, or talking, in terms of something like an RV "solely" for astro use. Whereas the reality is I would guess 1 in 5 trips will be astro specific, maybe less.

 

Consider it as an additional use for/with an RV but not a primary.

 

Will say that RV's are not so "common" here as in the US. We do not have the distances to cover that in effect makes them as popular or necessary. Neither do we have the RV sites either. What substitutes for them are camper vans and they are generally smaller so less space for equipment.

 

 

I see the RV as an alternative to a second home at the beach

or a cabin in the mountains, 

or multiple  trips around the world

 and easier to go at a minutes notice.

 

Wife saw it as better than checking into motels,

working about bed bugs, etc

 

 having immediate access to the bathroom can be VERY nice

for those of us with prostate issues

 

edj


Edited by edwincjones, 27 January 2018 - 07:54 AM.

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#72 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 12:05 PM

This thread is a really great read. I'm learning a lot about cost, comfort, maintenance, different designs and styles …

 

If I had to choose right now I would take my car, a Prius with amazing mileage and consider renting a camper in multiple locations to head into the wilds. Best of both worlds and surely more economical. I would also bring the tent and gear and motel stay.

 

Anyone have any rental experience to share?



#73 Knasal

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 03:11 PM

^ ^ ^ Great question. I'd like to hear the answers to that, too! 

 

Kevin



#74 rockethead26

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 07:51 PM

This thread is a really great read. I'm learning a lot about cost, comfort, maintenance, different designs and styles …

 

If I had to choose right now I would take my car, a Prius with amazing mileage and consider renting a camper in multiple locations to head into the wilds. Best of both worlds and surely more economical. I would also bring the tent and gear and motel stay.

 

Anyone have any rental experience to share?

I have only rented a RV once and got lucky mechanically, but there are plenty of reports of people breaking down during the rental period. Also, the RV wasn't up to my standards of clean. I am of the mind set that if I've waited a year or two to make a trip, I want to make sure I head out with equipment that I know is working well and maintained properly. So, for us now, it's a big tent or our own RV.


Edited by rockethead26, 27 January 2018 - 07:54 PM.


#75 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 08:14 PM

 

This thread is a really great read. I'm learning a lot about cost, comfort, maintenance, different designs and styles …

 

If I had to choose right now I would take my car, a Prius with amazing mileage and consider renting a camper in multiple locations to head into the wilds. Best of both worlds and surely more economical. I would also bring the tent and gear and motel stay.

 

Anyone have any rental experience to share?

I have only rented a RV once and got lucky mechanically, but there are plenty of reports of people breaking down during the rental period. Also, the RV wasn't up to my standards of clean. I am of the mind set that if I've waited a year or two to make a trip, I want to make sure I head out with equipment that I know is working well and maintained properly. So, for us now, it's a big tent or our own RV.

 

Weren't you stuck in a car park for 10,000 years or something? 


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