Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

RV/Trailer Astronomy Fact and Fiction

  • Please log in to reply
249 replies to this topic

#201 iam1ru12

iam1ru12

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 598
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Raleigh/Durham, NC

Posted 24 August 2020 - 11:38 PM

I thought I would share a AstroCamper design that I've been playing around with - something just for me as my wife and kids no longer join me at star parties

 

The design is based on an popular style of off-road campers but given my needs to keep in parked in my garage, I've designed it as a pop-top camper.  It has a wet bath (e.g. a cassette toilet and shower combo).  The "L" shaped lounge/dinette folds out to a little larger than a extra long twin (34" x 80") more than enough for one person to sleep quite comfortably.  It has a slide out kitchen with sink and camp stove.  The slide out electric refrigerator is also accessible when slid into the camper.  The rear storage/food pantry is accessible from both the inside and the outside.  All cooking would be outdoors.

 

Two 100ah AGM batteries would power the rig and could be kept charged via solar panels,  plugging into 30amp shore power would also be possible.  I can fit a 21 gallon fresh water tank onboard as well.  I would use a truma-combi water heater and furnace unit to provide both hot water and heat at night.  I have not designed A/C as part of the unit as I find most of the time I can get by with just good ventilation from a Fantastic Fan and open windows.  Thought I could install a similar 6,500 LG A/C unit link the one in my Aliner to provide more than enough cooling to such as small space.

 

A wrap-around 270 degree awning would provide plenty of shade more than enough shelter on rainy days.

 

I would use both white LEDs and red LEDs as lighting options inside and all windows would incorporate blackout shades.

 

Now, will I even build it or get help building it?  Who knows but it would take quite some time just working on it evenings and weekends.

 

Click to view larger images:

 

In travel mode - front view:

astrocamper1
 
In travel mode - rear view:
astrocamper2
 
Rear hatch open - food pantry and storage:
astrocamper3
 
Top Up, 270 awning deployed, kitchen out and frig out:
astrocamper4
 
Passenger wall removed to see inside, "L" shaped sitting area and table:
astrocamper5
 
Driver side wall removed to see inside, "L" shaped lounge in sleeping mode and wet-bath visible
astrocamper6

 

-Mike


  • dmdouglass and BinoGuy like this

#202 edwincjones

edwincjones

    Close Enough

  • *****
  • Posts: 13,931
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2004

Posted 25 August 2020 - 04:43 AM

if the popup top is canvas, that raises security issues from both people and bears

 

edj



#203 trainsktg

trainsktg

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,014
  • Joined: 23 Aug 2005
  • Loc: Oregon, Ohio, Texas

Posted 25 August 2020 - 04:58 AM

I’ve been full timing it for work for about for about eight out of the last twelve years now (three years gone, one year back home, two years gone again etc.). For the first ten I had a 32’ Class A, and now for the last two a 26’ tagalong. 

 

I don't have anything big with me. Previously I toted a 3.5” Questar, but I left that at home this time around and brought a TV85 and a Lunt LS50. They share one tripod and for the most part they share eyepieces too. I could go with bigger scopes easy,  but I have the last five feet of my trailer set up as an exercise space with a bike trainer, and in which I also store four bikes. I  have other non-astro, non-cycling,  hobby-related equipment with me as well. I hate a cluttered trailer so other than the bikes, the trailer storage  is sufficient to put  all of this away out of sight and not have to share sofa, kitchen table or bed space with any of it. 

 

Keith


Edited by trainsktg, 25 August 2020 - 05:00 AM.


#204 iam1ru12

iam1ru12

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 598
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Raleigh/Durham, NC

Posted 25 August 2020 - 07:27 AM

if the popup top is canvas, that raises security issues from both people and bears

 

edj

I’m not worried about security, if some wants in they will get in.  As for bears, even solid walls can keep out a determined bear.  That said, I don’t want canvas or fabric due to its poorer insulation values.  The pop top sides would be solid walls, just like the front dormer in my Aliner with the side walls and front walls nesting flat and in the pop top roof.

 

-Mike



#205 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 95,120
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 25 August 2020 - 07:50 AM

Now, will I even build it or get help building it?  Who knows but it would take quite some time just working on it evenings and weekends.

 

 

Just how long to think it would take to set it up after you pulled in for the evening?  

 

Jon



#206 jcj380

jcj380

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,504
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2014
  • Loc: Hellinois

Posted 25 August 2020 - 08:10 AM

Anybody have firsthand experience with a Runaway or small Tab - basically a box with a mattress and two doors?  Relatively light, cheap, and can be equipped with an air conditioner.  Main downside is they're crawl-ins - no room to stand up like a Polar Bear or Meerkat.



#207 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 95,120
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 25 August 2020 - 08:11 AM

The joke in the RV community is that you can TOW anything with a "Subaru Forester"......you just cannot stop.  Which if you think about it is much more of a problem than towing!!

 

I decided not to take ANY chances and tow my Casita with a 1-ton Dodge Ram diesel with a exhaust brake.  That makes sure that in combination with the trailer brakes in the Casita....I can stop.
 

 

Part of towing is stopping.  Anyone driving a tow vehicle needs to be aware of the increased stopping distances.  

 

And the concern with stopping is not the tow vehicle but the fact that travel trailers generally have electro-mechanical brakes which are so hokey, it's unbelievable that they are legal. They would not be legal on any car or truck.  These are drum brakes and they are actuated by a cam that has a lever attached to it.  At the end of the lever is an electro-magnet.  When the magnet is energized, it pulls against a steel plate in the inside of the drum which activates the cam, which spreads the brake shoes.  It works but barely when everything is right.  If there's a bad connection, there's no braking.  If the steel plate wears, there is no braking, if the electro magnet fails (which they do), there is no braking. 

 

Anyone towing a trailer with electric trailer brakes needs to be aware at every instant just how poor the brakes really are.  This means reduced speeds and increased following distances.  I see people towing trailers driving as if they had real brakes.  

 

Yesterday, I saw someone towing a horse trailer, it was a 5th wheel rig but it was all over the road.. that driver clearly had no idea of how limited the brakes were.

 

Trucks use air brakes which is a different world.  Towing a set of doubles, the tractor might weigh somewhere around 17,000 lbs, the rig would gross at 80,000 lbs.  

 

Jon


  • BinoGuy likes this

#208 iam1ru12

iam1ru12

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 598
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Raleigh/Durham, NC

Posted 25 August 2020 - 09:09 AM

Just how long to think it would take to set it up after you pulled in for the evening?  

 

Jon

In order to clear the garage door I need to be able to lower the whole trailer so my plan would be to use an air bag system to adjust the height.  Such a system would allow me to also use the air bags to leve side to side very quickly, no boards, blocks or leveling devices needed.

 

Assuming I was boondocking, I would need to:

  • decouple from tow vehicle: 2 mins
  • chalk wheels 0.5 mins
  • level side to side: instantly 
  • Level front to back: 1 min
  • pop the top and secure it: 2 mins
  • Open up windows, get breeze going: 1 min
  • deploy awning 2 mins

 

So within 10 mins of pulling in, my living quarters could be totally set up and  I could star setting up my scope.



#209 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 95,120
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 25 August 2020 - 09:21 AM

In order to clear the garage door I need to be able to lower the whole trailer so my plan would be to use an air bag system to adjust the height.  Such a system would allow me to also use the air bags to leve side to side very quickly, no boards, blocks or leveling devices needed.

 

Assuming I was boondocking, I would need to:

  • decouple from tow vehicle: 2 mins
  • chalk wheels 0.5 mins
  • level side to side: instantly 
  • Level front to back: 1 min
  • pop the top and secure it: 2 mins
  • Open up windows, get breeze going: 1 min
  • deploy awning 2 mins

 

So within 10 mins of pulling in, my living quarters could be totally set up and  I could star setting up my scope.

 

That is not what I see with much simpler popup trailers.  Have you ever actually owned a trailer?  

 

I would be surprised if you could set up something like that and be ready to use it in a half hour.  

 

Jon



#210 rockethead26

rockethead26

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7,358
  • Joined: 21 Oct 2009
  • Loc: Northern Arizona, USA

Posted 25 August 2020 - 09:47 AM

I thought I would share a AstroCamper design that I've been playing around with - something just for me as my wife and kids no longer join me at star parties

 

The design is based on an popular style of off-road campers but given my needs to keep in parked in my garage, I've designed it as a pop-top camper.  It has a wet bath (e.g. a cassette toilet and shower combo).  The "L" shaped lounge/dinette folds out to a little larger than a extra long twin (34" x 80") more than enough for one person to sleep quite comfortably.  It has a slide out kitchen with sink and camp stove.  The slide out electric refrigerator is also accessible when slid into the camper.  The rear storage/food pantry is accessible from both the inside and the outside.  All cooking would be outdoors.

 

Two 100ah AGM batteries would power the rig and could be kept charged via solar panels,  plugging into 30amp shore power would also be possible.  I can fit a 21 gallon fresh water tank onboard as well.  I would use a truma-combi water heater and furnace unit to provide both hot water and heat at night.  I have not designed A/C as part of the unit as I find most of the time I can get by with just good ventilation from a Fantastic Fan and open windows.  Thought I could install a similar 6,500 LG A/C unit link the one in my Aliner to provide more than enough cooling to such as small space.

 

A wrap-around 270 degree awning would provide plenty of shade more than enough shelter on rainy days.

 

I would use both white LEDs and red LEDs as lighting options inside and all windows would incorporate blackout shades.

 

Now, will I even build it or get help building it?  Who knows but it would take quite some time just working on it evenings and weekends.

 

Click to view larger images:

 

In travel mode - front view:

 
 
In travel mode - rear view:
 
 
Rear hatch open - food pantry and storage:
 
 
Top Up, 270 awning deployed, kitchen out and frig out:
 
 
Passenger wall removed to see inside, "L" shaped sitting area and table:
 
 
Driver side wall removed to see inside, "L" shaped lounge in sleeping mode and wet-bath visible
 

 

-Mike

The design is pretty creative, but I see a lot of entry points for water and cold. I hope you have experience building campers! Good luck with your project.


  • Jon Isaacs likes this

#211 NYJohn S

NYJohn S

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,806
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Northport, NY

Posted 25 August 2020 - 09:57 AM

In order to clear the garage door I need to be able to lower the whole trailer so my plan would be to use an air bag system to adjust the height.  Such a system would allow me to also use the air bags to leve side to side very quickly, no boards, blocks or leveling devices needed.

 

Assuming I was boondocking, I would need to:

  • decouple from tow vehicle: 2 mins
  • chalk wheels 0.5 mins
  • level side to side: instantly 
  • Level front to back: 1 min
  • pop the top and secure it: 2 mins
  • Open up windows, get breeze going: 1 min
  • deploy awning 2 mins

 

So within 10 mins of pulling in, my living quarters could be totally set up and  I could star setting up my scope.

I just pull in, flip a switch and the awning comes out. That probably takes me 10 mins smile.gif

Attached Thumbnails

  • Fish Creek Pond Rev-6070.jpg


#212 iam1ru12

iam1ru12

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 598
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Raleigh/Durham, NC

Posted 25 August 2020 - 11:57 AM

That is not what I see with much simpler popup trailers.  Have you ever actually owned a trailer?  

 

I would be surprised if you could set up something like that and be ready to use it in a half hour.  

 

Jon

Yes, I have an folding trailer now, an Aliner.  If I don’t set up the outdoor kitchen I’m finished in 10 to 15 mins.

 

My ECVAR camping set up

  • dmdouglass, NYJohn S and Echolight like this

#213 rhetfield

rhetfield

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,976
  • Joined: 14 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Suburban Chicago, IL, USA

Posted 25 August 2020 - 12:10 PM

That is not what I see with much simpler popup trailers.  Have you ever actually owned a trailer?  

 

I would be surprised if you could set up something like that and be ready to use it in a half hour.  

 

Jon

I would agree with that.  It is about a half hour for me to do the first four steps on a traditional trailer.  Got to factor in time getting stuff out of storage hatches, walking around the rig, and driving the tow vehicle out of the way.  The retractable canopy is fast and easy, but still 5-15 minutes depending on how well I want it windproofed.

 

All the setup will always take longer than expected.  With little fold up trailers there is all the stuff to pull out and all the stored stuff to rearrange to convert to "living mode".

 

I tend to go by the "kiss" principle.  Keep it as simple and minimalized as possible if quick setup/takedown is the goal.


  • Jon Isaacs likes this

#214 JMW

JMW

    Aurora

  • -----
  • Posts: 4,577
  • Joined: 11 Feb 2007
  • Loc: Nevada

Posted 25 August 2020 - 12:19 PM

I posted on this thread back in 2018 before we bought our Artic Fox 22G. We tow it with a GMC2500HD with a 6.5 foot bed with BedRug and Leer cap with a 265 watt solar panel on top. I keep my astronomy gear in the truck bed.

 

We use the trailer for recreational and astronomy camping. We take an 8 inch f/6 Dob and a TEC 140 for recreational camping where we have to setup and break down each night. Its nice having the gear in the truck in case we have to drive to a better location than the camping area for astronomy. We take more astronomy gear if we are going to a destination star party where gear can stay setup for multiple nights.

 

We also like to use the trailer for going to the GSSP or OSP, both of course canceled for 2020. I learned my wife didn't like me running the generator to enjoy the air conditioning while camping near other in tents. I made changes to increase the solar to 2345 watts and changed the air conditioner to a 11,000 power saver model that can easily be run all day on the Multiplus Inverter/Charger using only solar and battery power. We have 1440 watts on the roof, 265 watts on the truck Leer cap and 640 watts of portable panels that are setup in series.

 

The trailer is 23.5 feet long which can fit into smaller places found in state, national forest or national parks. The lower height helps drive roads with lower tree branches. The trailer is well insulation which makes it easier to air condition or heat. We use aluminum reflectix over the windows when going to star parties to prevent light leaking in or out. It also helps for sleeping in after the sun is up.

 

The trailer is a major upgrade from our old 5x8 trailer that we used for 10 years of astronomy camping.

 

Here is a photo of the solar on our roof. It is pretty much maxed out for solar.

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • FrontTrailerRoof.jpg


#215 rhetfield

rhetfield

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,976
  • Joined: 14 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Suburban Chicago, IL, USA

Posted 25 August 2020 - 12:33 PM

I thought I would share a AstroCamper design that I've been playing around with - something just for me as my wife and kids no longer join me at star parties

 

The design is based on an popular style of off-road campers but given my needs to keep in parked in my garage, I've designed it as a pop-top camper.  It has a wet bath (e.g. a cassette toilet and shower combo).  The "L" shaped lounge/dinette folds out to a little larger than a extra long twin (34" x 80") more than enough for one person to sleep quite comfortably.  It has a slide out kitchen with sink and camp stove.  The slide out electric refrigerator is also accessible when slid into the camper.  The rear storage/food pantry is accessible from both the inside and the outside.  All cooking would be outdoors.

 

Two 100ah AGM batteries would power the rig and could be kept charged via solar panels,  plugging into 30amp shore power would also be possible.  I can fit a 21 gallon fresh water tank onboard as well.  I would use a truma-combi water heater and furnace unit to provide both hot water and heat at night.  I have not designed A/C as part of the unit as I find most of the time I can get by with just good ventilation from a Fantastic Fan and open windows.  Thought I could install a similar 6,500 LG A/C unit link the one in my Aliner to provide more than enough cooling to such as small space.

 

A wrap-around 270 degree awning would provide plenty of shade more than enough shelter on rainy days.

 

I would use both white LEDs and red LEDs as lighting options inside and all windows would incorporate blackout shades.

 

Now, will I even build it or get help building it?  Who knows but it would take quite some time just working on it evenings and weekends.

 

Click to view larger images:

 

In travel mode - front view:

 
 
In travel mode - rear view:
 
 
Rear hatch open - food pantry and storage:
 
 
Top Up, 270 awning deployed, kitchen out and frig out:
 
 
Passenger wall removed to see inside, "L" shaped sitting area and table:
 
 
Driver side wall removed to see inside, "L" shaped lounge in sleeping mode and wet-bath visible
 

 

-Mike

I would heed the warnings about water entry points - even the commercial builders struggle with that.

 

I would also take a close look at the power consumption on the furnace.  If it is a version with a blower, those will suck a battery dry in only a winter night or two.  I have almost double your battery capacity and only get 2-3 days when winter camping.  Solar is not likely to put a full charge on in just a day.  Jumper cables from the tow vehicle help some.

 

I have found that 6V golf cart batteries pack the most Ah per cubic inch.  You just have to wire them in series.


  • Jon Isaacs likes this

#216 iam1ru12

iam1ru12

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 598
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Raleigh/Durham, NC

Posted 25 August 2020 - 12:34 PM

The design is pretty creative, but I see a lot of entry points for water and cold. I hope you have experience building campers! Good luck with your project.

Thanks.  I have not built a trailer before which is why I’m very hesitant to build this design.

 

I do have a folding camper now, an Aliner so I’m familiar with the possible entry points for water and cold air and some options to remediate. 
 

-Mike



#217 iam1ru12

iam1ru12

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 598
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Raleigh/Durham, NC

Posted 25 August 2020 - 01:01 PM

I would heed the warnings about water entry points - even the commercial builders struggle with that.

 

I would also take a close look at the power consumption on the furnace.  If it is a version with a blower, those will suck a battery dry in only a winter night or two.  I have almost double your battery capacity and only get 2-3 days when winter camping.  Solar is not likely to put a full charge on in just a day.  Jumper cables from the tow vehicle help some.

 

I have found that 6V golf cart batteries pack the most Ah per cubic inch.  You just have to wire them in series.

Yes, water intrusion is one a big concern and one I would need to tackle should I decide to build this camper.  The folding parts of the roof will need to have replaceable seals and I’ll need to be creative on keeping water from pooling and make sure it drains quickly.



#218 rhetfield

rhetfield

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,976
  • Joined: 14 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Suburban Chicago, IL, USA

Posted 25 August 2020 - 02:13 PM

Go to a big RV show if there is one near you.  Most trailers and RV's are fairly generic, but often you will see a few that have implemented some cool ideas that you can borrow.



#219 TL2101

TL2101

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,731
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2010
  • Loc: Northern California

Posted 30 April 2021 - 09:22 PM

I finally made a decision on my camper for traveling. I put down a deposit this week for the Project M Four Wheel Pop Up Camper. This model allows you to keep your tailgate on the truck and have full access to the truck bed. It's light in weight and light on amenities but I will be towing an Airstream Basecamp 20X behind it. I was going to get the Casita, but when I told my brother he said he would buy the Airstream if I would take him to a star party. An offer I couldn't refuse. grin.gif

 

The Project M has an all aluminum frame so no worries about rot if water were to get inside. I ordered the AGM battery power solution which includes truck charging along with 160 watts of solar. This will power a Dometic 75 liter freezer/refrigerator. A BLUETTI AC50S Power Station 500Wh lithium battery will also be installed. Two Maxxair fans and a king sized bed are part of the package. 

 

There is a 9 month lead time on both the Project M Camper and the Airstream. This setup allows us to have separate campers for sleeping.

 

Here are some photos showing the Project M Camper frame construction, my metallic charcoal color choice and one installed from the companies website. Lots of room for gear in the truck and all the creature comforts in the Airstream.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 177526497_3989327947803094_5988742895025729086_n.jpg
  • Project M 1.jpg
  • Project M.JPG

Edited by TL2101, 01 May 2021 - 08:48 AM.

  • BRCoz, ctcables, rockethead26 and 3 others like this

#220 TL2101

TL2101

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,731
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2010
  • Loc: Northern California

Posted 30 April 2021 - 09:30 PM

Here are photos of the Airstream Basecamp 20X.

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_0745.jpg
  • IMG_0747.jpg

Edited by TL2101, 30 April 2021 - 09:32 PM.

  • niteskystargazer, stevenwav, mikerepp and 3 others like this

#221 JMW

JMW

    Aurora

  • -----
  • Posts: 4,577
  • Joined: 11 Feb 2007
  • Loc: Nevada

Posted 05 May 2021 - 05:54 PM

Well hopefully 2021 is better for travel than last year. GSSP is canceled but we hope that OSP happens. We have 30 nights of astronomy camping planned between May and October this year. A lot of months we are doing 3-4 night long weekends. We also have a 10 night and 11 night trip planned.

 

We have owned the trailer for 3 years. I am finished making upgrades so this year we are just enjoying our Artic Fox 22G. 

 

Starting phase in retirement this summer so every weekend will be a 3 day weekend for 18 months followed by another 18 months of 4 day weekends before full retirement. Hopefully a lot of good astronomy camping with the extra time.


Edited by JMW, 05 May 2021 - 05:54 PM.


#222 Oskiinspace

Oskiinspace

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 46
  • Joined: 05 Apr 2020
  • Loc: Los Angeles, CA

Posted 05 May 2021 - 09:43 PM

Just found this thread and it’s  absolutely awesome. I take out my tiny 14’ camper trailer when I go out imaging. Pretty cool to see others who do this! 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 8E812713-C82E-4037-99AC-375AF0469C18.jpeg

  • dmdouglass, CCD-Freak, niteskystargazer and 3 others like this

#223 Starry Jan

Starry Jan

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 24
  • Joined: 12 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Pennsylvania

Posted 03 July 2021 - 05:35 PM

Wonderful thread!  Thanks everyone for your insights.   However, all of the messagers seem to be guys.   I'm a retired woman; my husband is not interested in astronomy trips.  I've been doing tent camping since I became interested in astronomy about 15 years ago, but tent living is getting less comfortable and I am more and more interested in a Class B unit.   Guys, if your wives were making these trips alone, how would your advice change?    I can only lift about 35 pounds.   I can't imagine dealing alone with a trailer.  I have a 8" SCT but always thinking about a bigger dob as long as I could lift and assemble it.  

 

Any advice?


  • BinoGuy likes this

#224 rhetfield

rhetfield

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,976
  • Joined: 14 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Suburban Chicago, IL, USA

Posted 04 July 2021 - 06:59 AM

The best thing I can think of is to see what it would take to get hubby to come along. A bigger RV may be the ticket.

With a class B, your home will need to be packed up every time you go to the store or restaurant. Think about how you can minimize the packing process. Also the process of converting from day use to bedtime. Big scope storage also needs planning or it will always be in the way.

As a single woman, the best thing is probably to take a friend with you.

Heaviest things with class B are water and propane bottles

#225 RazvanUnderStars

RazvanUnderStars

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,392
  • Joined: 15 Jul 2014
  • Loc: Toronto, Canada

Posted 04 July 2021 - 07:25 AM

Since you already have camping equipment (same here): depending on what car you have, an alternative is to sleep in the car if it's long enough. Last year I replaced my old rusty car with an SUV in which, with the second and third row seats down, I can sleep flat (on an inflatable camping underlayer) and without coiling - the sleep is fine. The telescope and tripod lie along, so nothing of value is left outside. In case I need to heat anything, I have the small backpacking gas stove.

 

I know this is the RV thread, but for me this was an excellent compromise: no need to buy another vehicle or trailer, worry about maintenance and at night just a car doesn't attract much attention. 

 

The downside is that there's only room for one person this way and while it will work for your current SCT, a dob is a different story. 

 

Wonderful thread!  Thanks everyone for your insights.   However, all of the messagers seem to be guys.   I'm a retired woman; my husband is not interested in astronomy trips.  I've been doing tent camping since I became interested in astronomy about 15 years ago, but tent living is getting less comfortable and I am more and more interested in a Class B unit.   Guys, if your wives were making these trips alone, how would your advice change?    I can only lift about 35 pounds.   I can't imagine dealing alone with a trailer.  I have a 8" SCT but always thinking about a bigger dob as long as I could lift and assemble it.  

 

Any advice?




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics