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#1 gunny1998

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 03:42 PM

Just setting here gathering dust as Indiana weather doesn't want to cooperate My New DOB hasn't been outdoors yet ..I hope to see M42 before its too 

late.....Now im learning when to see what !!! its been very frustrating I need to plan Vacation trips in the Winter Time any good suggestions where other people go ?? That has other amature astronomer like me ????


Edited by gunny1998, 08 February 2018 - 03:44 PM.

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#2 havasman

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 03:54 PM

We had a couple of guys from Ft Wayne join Texas Astronomical Society of Dallas a couple of years ago so they could take advantage of the club dark site in SE Oklahoma as it was the nearest dark site that met their needs. They'd head down and trailer camp for a week at a time.

It's darker than your locale likely is and it's usually not under the jetstream that plagues the northern tier states.


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#3 bobito

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 03:57 PM

The best objects this time of year don't require magnification to enjoy, so don't feel you need to wait for a perfectly steady night.  M42, Andromeda (M31), Double Cluster (ngc869), and the Pleiades (M45) will be plenty nice to look at through moderate turbulence.

 

It is nice to pump up the magnification on the Trapezium (center of m42) but the Orion Nebula is certainly great to look at using low magnification as well.

 

Bob


Edited by bobito, 08 February 2018 - 03:57 PM.

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#4 spacemunkee

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 05:09 PM

 If it's any consolation i feel your pain. Near Cincinnati here. Got back deep into astronomy after a long hiatus back about Oct/ Nov. Since then i have a better estimate on how accurate local whether prediction is. "Mostly cloudy tonight, possible blizzard with 2 feet of snow". Step out through the night... clear... clear... clear...

"Clear tonight".  Set up, all ready to go... and here they come... cloud haunted..


Edited by spacemunkee, 08 February 2018 - 05:10 PM.

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#5 Mike W.

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 05:37 PM

Gunny, M42 ain't the only thing up there,,,,,,,,cool.gif

 

It's been three months here,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,frown.gif


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#6 Starkid2u

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 05:50 PM

Gunny, don't feel bad. A lot of us are just biding our time until spring arrives. While I HAVE had a couple of clear nights or two, it's been waaaaay too cold for ME to go out there and I don't feel like standing in a foot of snow, either. So I haven't seen squat. The one big deal that you are about to miss is the Winter Star Party, held every Feb in Florida. This year it was moved to Cheifland's site after Irma destroyed the Keys location. But they're soldering on! It's expensive to attend (mostly the cost of going to/from the Northern states) but nevertheless, it IS a "bucket list" trip. Maybe next year, right?

 

Semper Fi

 

STARKID2U


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#7 vtornado

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 06:01 PM

Gunny, this year not typical.

 

Last year I had many nights.  I live in NE illinois, and this year it has been either clouds, frigid, snowing, raining, or really windy.  I think I have had 2 nights in two months to look at anything.  Hang in there.

 

VT.


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#8 Ken Sturrock

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 06:27 PM

If you can swing it, Flagstaff, AZ is a fun astronomy-friendly place. Lowell Observatory just re-opened the newly-restored Pluto astrograph so you can see both it and the Clark. The Grand Canyon isn't far away, either.


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#9 theastroimager

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 06:49 PM

Unless you're willing to take the Airbus to the southwest US, just plan on waiting it out. Other than that, your best shot at anything resembling truly dark sky is in western Indiana, near Turkey Run or Shades State Parks. Second place would be around Nashville. Not great but vastly better than the suburbs of Indianapolis. 

 

I went to the IAS star party once somewhere between Indy and Lafayette. I've not been back since. Not the IAS's fault, it just isn't very dark. It's not just Indiana, it's everything east of the Mississippi (with the exception of some spots in West Virginia and central Florida). 

 

By the way, thank you for your service.

 

John C. Ruthroff

SFC, USA, Retired



#10 W. T. Riker

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 07:56 PM

Take a trip to 3RF in Texas. The campus has bunkhouses, a 15" refractor, and obsession dobs from 18-30". 

 

https://www.3rf.org/campus


Edited by W. T. Riker, 08 February 2018 - 08:02 PM.


#11 Starkid2u

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 04:35 PM

Unless you're willing to take the Airbus to the southwest US, just plan on waiting it out. Other than that, your best shot at anything resembling truly dark sky is in western Indiana, near Turkey Run or Shades State Parks. Second place would be around Nashville. Not great but vastly better than the suburbs of Indianapolis. 

 

I went to the IAS star party once somewhere between Indy and Lafayette. I've not been back since. Not the IAS's fault, it just isn't very dark. It's not just Indiana, it's everything east of the Mississippi (with the exception of some spots in West Virginia and central Florida). 

 

By the way, thank you for your service.

 

John C. Ruthroff

SFC, USA, Retired

I'm sorry, but with all due respect, sir, there IS one place in the NE that is not WVA where the night skies rule unfettered by light pollution. That would be Cherry Spring State Park in NW PA. I know, I go there every year. It is an IDA approved Gold Level site. There's so little light that the clouds are black there.  If that's not to your liking or you live further south, you can attend the Staunton River State Park in SW VA, a Silver Level site. I have been here, too. They both will give you what you are looking for.  Both of these sites host star parties every year and no one leaves disappointed if they've had a clear night or two. Just setting the record straight, that's all.

 

Semper Fi

 

STARKID2U


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#12 Nick K.

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 06:11 PM

Winter vacation trips are good if you live where snow falls but you want to use your telescope without your feet freezing to the ground.  Texas is good, Arizona is good, and there may be some places in southern New Mexico that are good.  Been to all three and loved 'em all.  It does get cold in northern Arizona, northern Texas and northern New Mexico though.  Sounds like a fun research project to find a place to spend a week or so next winter.  Good luck.



#13 Achernar

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 08:21 PM

Few truly clear nights come along here when the nearly full moon's not up, or I have to work the next day. I understand your frustration, the Gulf Coast where I am is more often than not cloudy with rain or thunderstorms for weeks at a time day and night, or just very milky and or cloudy. As a result of the really bad weather over the past three months, my Dobs are gathering dust.

 

Taras



#14 csrlice12

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 08:23 PM

All dust is star dust...



#15 Feidb

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 09:27 AM

One reason I was glad to get out of Indiana. By luck, job and circumstances, I ended up in Las Vegas and love it here. However, there have still been some years when I've only been able to get out four times in an entire year because of weather and other things.

 

I feel your pain.

 

For example. The last time I've been out was December. I'm crossing my fingers for next Saturday, 17 Feb. We'll see....

 

Oh, and I have to add I got a new EP and cell phone adapter for Christmas so you might want to add the new equipment curse to that equation.


Edited by Feidb, 12 February 2018 - 09:28 AM.


#16 jjbag

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 11:57 AM

Just setting here gathering dust as Indiana weather doesn't want to cooperate My New DOB hasn't been outdoors yet ..I hope to see M42 before its too 

late.....Now im learning when to see what !!! its been very frustrating I need to plan Vacation trips in the Winter Time any good suggestions where other people go ?? That has other amature astronomer like me ????

Vacation selection In winter -  Hawaii (big Island) Mauna Kea,  Australia -  outback..   New Zealand...   Any place warm and Dark skies.  



#17 Jim_V

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 01:26 PM

All dust is star dust...

In most house's it's actually shed skin....



#18 vtornado

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 02:08 PM

 

All dust is star dust...

In most house's it's actually shed skin....

 

true, but our skin is from star-stuff too



#19 jcj380

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 02:05 PM

Gunny, this year not typical.

 

Last year I had many nights.  I live in NE illinois, and this year it has been either clouds, frigid, snowing, raining, or really windy.  I think I have had 2 nights in two months to look at anything.  Hang in there.

 

VT.

Yeah, Chicago has been nasty since forever.  A couple of clear nights without a lot of moonlight with tolerable temperatures at best.



#20 Ericco79

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 11:34 AM

I can relate. :( Here in Charlotte, NC the 10 day forecast reads as follows:

 

Today: Cloudy

Wednesday: Mostly Cloudy

Thursday: Showers, (though Thursday night looks hopefull)

Friday: Partly Cloudy

Saturday: Cloudy / Showers

Sunday: Cloudy / Showers

Monday: Cloudy

Tuesday: Partly Sunny (Hopefully!)

Wednesday: Cloudy / Showers

Thursday: Cloudy / Showers

Friday: Showers

Saturday: Cloudy

Sunday: Cloudy / Showers

Monday: Cloudy / Showers

Tuesday: Showers

 

I can't catch a break! And now that's it not 15-20 degrees outside, we get rain rain rain!
 

Eric



#21 RobertMaples

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 09:45 AM

Unless you're willing to take the Airbus to the southwest US, just plan on waiting it out. Other than that, your best shot at anything resembling truly dark sky is in western Indiana, near Turkey Run or Shades State Parks. Second place would be around Nashville. Not great but vastly better than the suburbs of Indianapolis. 

 

I went to the IAS star party once somewhere between Indy and Lafayette. I've not been back since. Not the IAS's fault, it just isn't very dark. It's not just Indiana, it's everything east of the Mississippi (with the exception of some spots in West Virginia and central Florida). 

 

By the way, thank you for your service.

 

John C. Ruthroff

SFC, USA, Retired

There are actually two International Dark-Sky Association sites in Tennessee, one is the Obed Wild and Scenic River and the other is in Pickett CCC Memorial State Park.  They are both in the northeastern part of the state and close enough to Indiana for a weekend trip.  Unfortunately, I have not been to either one yet (I've just been viewing for a little over a year now) but I do know they both host star parties.  While not an official dark site, Fall Creek Falls also has dark skies and has a viewing field where they host star parties.



#22 RalphMeisterTigerMan

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 05:37 AM

Dear Gunny, as a Canadian and a civilian, I have never had the opportunity to call anyone "gunny". I enjoy many fine American TV shows, such as NCIS and have watched many war movies about the United States Marines and am well aware that Gunny is an abbreviation for Gunnery Sargent.

 

I am also sitting here, but it is I who is gathering dust and not my telescope...perhaps I should move a little from time to time. LOL!

 

Having just acquired a Skywatcher 10" collapsible tube dobsonian reflector, I am just itching to try it out. Unfortunately, not only am I still recovering from intense Hernia surgery, but it has also been freaking cold outside. I live in Abbotsford B.C., which is about an hours drive east of Vancouver B.C.

Lately, the temperature has hovering between 1 degree Celsius and -4 degrees Celcius.That's approx. .between 35 F and 23 F. While I do put on a warm coat and check out the Moon in binos, it's a little too cold to set up an entire scope, at least it is in my current condition.

 

So I spend a lot of time watching TV, checking out things on Cloudy Nights, and reading my various astronomy periodicals.

 

I know it will warm up soon and I should get some decent observing weather, but that just seems so long away. So, I'll keep collecting dust (LOL) and try to keep busy and from going completely coo-coo.

 

RalphMeisterTigerMan



#23 Jim_V

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 08:07 PM

Dear Gunny, as a Canadian and a civilian, I have never had the opportunity to call anyone "gunny". I enjoy many fine American TV shows, such as NCIS and have watched many war movies about the United States Marines and am well aware that Gunny is an abbreviation for Gunnery Sargent.

 

I am also sitting here, but it is I who is gathering dust and not my telescope...perhaps I should move a little from time to time. LOL!

 

Having just acquired a Skywatcher 10" collapsible tube dobsonian reflector, I am just itching to try it out. Unfortunately, not only am I still recovering from intense Hernia surgery, but it has also been freaking cold outside. I live in Abbotsford B.C., which is about an hours drive east of Vancouver B.C.

Lately, the temperature has hovering between 1 degree Celsius and -4 degrees Celcius.That's approx. .between 35 F and 23 F. While I do put on a warm coat and check out the Moon in binos, it's a little too cold to set up an entire scope, at least it is in my current condition.

 

So I spend a lot of time watching TV, checking out things on Cloudy Nights, and reading my various astronomy periodicals.

 

I know it will warm up soon and I should get some decent observing weather, but that just seems so long away. So, I'll keep collecting dust (LOL) and try to keep busy and from going completely coo-coo.

 

RalphMeisterTigerMan

Sorry to hear about the surgery. That said, I've been out observing in -25F, and discovered that's about the limit of cold for my Evo. Got so cold the grease, was so thick, the focus stopped working, and the rubber just spun of the shaft... 

My point, cold is relative...



#24 Mike W.

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 09:59 PM

I'm collecting more dust than my scope is,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,



#25 E Sully

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 12:41 PM

Dear Gunny, as a Canadian and a civilian, I have never had the opportunity to call anyone "gunny". I enjoy many fine American TV shows, such as NCIS and have watched many war movies about the United States Marines and am well aware that Gunny is an abbreviation for Gunnery Sargent.

 

I am also sitting here, but it is I who is gathering dust and not my telescope...perhaps I should move a little from time to time. LOL!

 

Having just acquired a Skywatcher 10" collapsible tube dobsonian reflector, I am just itching to try it out. Unfortunately, not only am I still recovering from intense Hernia surgery, but it has also been freaking cold outside. I live in Abbotsford B.C., which is about an hours drive east of Vancouver B.C.

Lately, the temperature has hovering between 1 degree Celsius and -4 degrees Celcius.That's approx. .between 35 F and 23 F. While I do put on a warm coat and check out the Moon in binos, it's a little too cold to set up an entire scope, at least it is in my current condition.

 

So I spend a lot of time watching TV, checking out things on Cloudy Nights, and reading my various astronomy periodicals.

 

I know it will warm up soon and I should get some decent observing weather, but that just seems so long away. So, I'll keep collecting dust (LOL) and try to keep busy and from going completely coo-coo.

 

RalphMeisterTigerMan

Good luck with the recovery.  I had mine done back in 2007.  Quite painful for awhile. 




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