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Arp 206 galaxy

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#1 schmeah

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 10:42 PM

NGC 3432 in Leo minor. A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy distorted by its interaction with satellite galaxy UGC 5983. There is not too much info on this one,  Rick Js deeper image and description is here: https://www.cloudyni...p-206-ngc-3432/  There are numerous tiny galaxies in this cropped field. 

 

This was more or less a salvage effort. Brisk winds > 10 MPH caused guide star loss which resulted in drift of the target halfway across the chip. Props to CCD Stack / CCDIS for easily aligning stars that were nowhere near eachother. I didn't think I would have anything worthwhile from last night. Thanks for looking.

 

http://www.pbase.com...167005054/large

 

Derek

 

 

 

 

NGC3432LRGBsmall.jpg


Edited by schmeah, 14 February 2018 - 09:41 AM.

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#2 scopenitout

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 10:51 PM

Definitely worthwhile, Derek. This image has a real "deep space" look to it.
Thank you.

#3 anismo

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 10:52 PM

Love your targets.. every time it is something out of the way.. Thanks for sharing.



#4 Roberto Marinoni

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 03:14 AM

Very interesting object!



#5 schmeah

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 06:38 AM

Definitely worthwhile, Derek. This image has a real "deep space" look to it.
Thank you.

Thanks. You may notice however that the top quarter of the image looks less "deep space" than the rest of the image. That is a result of the drift that I mentioned. The top of the frame is a result about 1/5 of the data. It required some work to get the background to look like the rest of the image. I should probably have just cropped the galaxy out and used that.

 

Love your targets.. every time it is something out of the way.. Thanks for sharing.

Thanks Anis. That's the benefit of long FL imaging. There are literally thousands of targets to choose from.

 

Very interesting object!

Thanks Roberto

 

 

Derek



#6 happylimpet

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:47 AM

I'm confused - I thought you made a reference to a mystery star in the cloud above the galaxy...but the reference isnt there now.

 

Anyhow, I agree - it looks like a supernova to me. Or asteroid, but unlikely at that Dec.

 

Have you checked?  Or reported it to IAUC or whoever it is?

 

(speaking as a frustrated co-discoverer of the SN in M82!)



#7 schmeah

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:58 AM

I'm confused - I thought you made a reference to a mystery star in the cloud above the galaxy...but the reference isnt there now.

 

Anyhow, I agree - it looks like a supernova to me. Or asteroid, but unlikely at that Dec.

 

Have you checked?  Or reported it to IAUC or whoever it is?

 

(speaking as a frustrated co-discoverer of the SN in M82!)

Thanks. I removed it because moments after posting, I noted that it was present in Rick Js image. Curious though, that numerous other images of it, including more recent, show no hint of it.

 

Derek

 

edit: for anyone else who may have seen the post that I deleted, I noted a star in the "ejected" galactic clump that I saw on no other images of it ... until I looked again at Rick Js. I will investigate this curiosity further.


Edited by schmeah, 14 February 2018 - 10:04 AM.


#8 happylimpet

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:48 AM

 

I'm confused - I thought you made a reference to a mystery star in the cloud above the galaxy...but the reference isnt there now.

 

Anyhow, I agree - it looks like a supernova to me. Or asteroid, but unlikely at that Dec.

 

Have you checked?  Or reported it to IAUC or whoever it is?

 

(speaking as a frustrated co-discoverer of the SN in M82!)

Thanks. I removed it because moments after posting, I noted that it was present in Rick Js image. Curious though, that numerous other images of it, including more recent, show no hint of it.

 

Derek

 

edit: for anyone else who may have seen the post that I deleted, I noted a star in the "ejected" galactic clump that I saw on no other images of it ... until I looked again at Rick Js. I will investigate this curiosity further.

 

Ah OK! Strange cos its not in the SDSS online sky survey or the DSS (both through wikisky).

 

What can it be?!! Some long-period variable in our galaxy?



#9 schmeah

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:13 PM

Ah OK! Strange cos its not in the SDSS online sky survey or the DSS (both through wikisky).

 

 

 

What can it be?!! Some long-period variable in our galaxy?

 

So I'm reading up a bit on luminous blue variables which have periodic eruptions, and similar such phenomenon. It is curious that there is no hint of it on many images of similar and greater depth, but that it is clearly evident on Rick's. I have found one other where it is apparent, and a couple where there is a hint of it. I doubt it's purely technical because no other objects of similar brightness on my image are variably present on the other images that I have seen thus far.

 

Derek



#10 anismo

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 08:00 PM

 

 

 

Love your targets.. every time it is something out of the way.. Thanks for sharing.

Thanks Anis. That's the benefit of long FL imaging. There are literally thousands of targets to choose from.

 

 

 

Derek

 

You guys (and josh smith, Jason) are my inspiration for going with a long focal length setup as well



#11 schmeah

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 08:47 AM

 

 

 

 

Love your targets.. every time it is something out of the way.. Thanks for sharing.

Thanks Anis. That's the benefit of long FL imaging. There are literally thousands of targets to choose from.

 

 

 

Derek

 

You guys (and josh smith, Jason) are my inspiration for going with a long focal length setup as well

 

Thanks Anis. And I would say your Edge 11 images are pretty inspirational.

 

Derek



#12 happylimpet

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 08:20 AM

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1006.0504.pdf

 

Seems its a well-known LBV (luminous blue variable). Cool to image a single star in such a distant galaxy! It gets up to about 6 million times the sun's luminosity and has been mistakenly recorded as a SN.

 

Here's one I imaged in NGC 2403

 

https://www.astrobin...1739/C/?nc=user



#13 astrovienna

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 08:47 AM

This is only 3.5 hours of data from a white zone in poor conditions?  Wow!  I think it looks great, Derek.

 

Kevin



#14 schmeah

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:38 AM

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1006.0504.pdf

 

Seems its a well-known LBV (luminous blue variable). Cool to image a single star in such a distant galaxy! It gets up to about 6 million times the sun's luminosity and has been mistakenly recorded as a SN.

 

Here's one I imaged in NGC 2403

 

https://www.astrobin...1739/C/?nc=user

Yes, a started a new thread, and there is a lot of info on it here:

https://www.cloudyni...rnova-imposter/

 

This is only 3.5 hours of data from a white zone in poor conditions?  Wow!  I think it looks great, Derek.

 

Kevin

Thanks Kevin. Out of necessity I have become an expert in gradient removal and noise reduction :)




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