Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

AC to DC power supplies

equipment
  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Glutch

Glutch

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 101
  • Joined: 24 Mar 2016
  • Loc: North Richland Hills Texas

Posted 14 February 2018 - 10:13 AM

Greets all, I am looking at purchasing a good 12v power supply to run my rig.  I have looked at several but wanted to check with the forum to see what they are using.  I currently have a 100AH battery and will at some point add a powergate to bridge the AC unit with the battery for uninterrupted power at dark sites/star parties.  



#2 Akwilliams

Akwilliams

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 110
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2016

Posted 14 February 2018 - 10:29 AM

I'm using one of these:

 

https://www.amazon.c...da power supply

 

I dont use the cigarette adaptor port, i come straight off the poles.  Feeds a nice steady 13.8v to my rig.  Never had a problem with it since i bought it a year or so ago.



#3 WadeH237

WadeH237

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2862
  • Joined: 24 Feb 2007
  • Loc: Snohomish, WA

Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:04 AM

I use the older version of this.

 

I used to use a Pyramid 20 amp power supply.  Lots of people have had really good experiences with the Pyramid, and it is a lot cheaper than the PowerWerx that I linked above.  But I got one that failed, and when it did, it failed by sending 20 volts through all of my equipment.  When it happened, the power supply started buzzing and every piece of equipment failed.  Fortunately, nothing was permanently damaged (except the power supply itself).  Disconnecting everything from the power and hard booting the system from batteries recovered things.

 

It was at that point that I switched to the PowerWerx, and I couldn't be happier.  The PowerWerx is much smaller and lighter than the Pyramid, and it runs far cooler.  I've also incorporated a Buck-Boost converter inline with the power supply, so voltage is regulated at a constant 13.1 volts, regardless of whether I'm running from batteries or the DC converter.  This would have protected my gear with the Pyramid, too, since it would have reduced the 20 volts to 13.1.


  • jdupton and ChrisMoses like this

#4 CounterWeight

CounterWeight

    Star walker

  • *****
  • Posts: 10156
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: PDX, OR.

Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:14 AM

I've been using various Pyramid units for years in the 10 to 20A range.  Had a failure of one (cant remember when) but I think it was my fault, moisture getting into it while powered on. 



#5 halx

halx

    Vendor (DSO Planner)

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 1282
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2010
  • Loc: Albany, California, USA

Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:17 AM

Why is a 100Ah battery not enough? Use it at night, charge from an AC source or DC (i.e. solar) you have daytime. That's the sanest solution with zero compromises (AC/DC is always a compromise).


Edited by halx, 14 February 2018 - 11:20 AM.


#6 MalVeauX

MalVeauX

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2764
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Florida

Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:18 AM

I use a pyramid power supply, 12V and 10 amps. It's handled my imaging needs outside for over a year straight, rock solid performance, and it lives outside in a plastic bin to shield it from rain and stuff, but it stays there at my pier powering my stuff. I run my mount, camera and two heaters from it.

 

Pyramid, PS-15KX

Banana plugs to DC (to go straight from the poles if you don't want to use a cigarette lighter port)

I then use a 4 way splitter to go to all the equipment.

 

31716094994_79ccd5cd90_c.jpg

 

Very best,



#7 Jeff Struve

Jeff Struve

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 2414
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Iowa, USA

Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:43 AM

Without my reading the above, I just wanted to add an experience in powering my ASUS ROG 552 Laptop via 12v supply....

 

I purchased a power supply that converted the cars cigarette lighter to the 19.6v or 15v or what ever was needed for the laptop... the laptop did not recognize that power source at all. I then used my power converter to convert the 110v wall outlet to the 12v and used that same adapter... same thing. The laptop did not see that power. 

 

I then tried a small converter that I had... converts the 12v car battery to 110v and used the OEM power supply that came with the laptop... again, the laptop did not recognize that it had external power.

 

Then I purchased a modified sine wave power inverter to convert the 12v car battery to 110v... the laptop cycled on and off external power... like a clock...

 

I returned the modified sine wave unit for a pure sine wave unit, and all works well. 

 

ASUS was not any help throughout my trials and tribulations, until I told them that the pure wave worked... they acted like... oh, ok , that makes sense...

 

Anyway... I didn't have this issue with other laptops, but I am now with the understanding that the higher power the computer, the more likely one is to experience this phenomena... and maybe there is some impact to other gear that sneaks into play unknowingly...

 

Anyway... there ya go! 


  • halx and jdupton like this

#8 twincek

twincek

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: 10 Jan 2011

Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:54 AM

I use an Astron linear PS.  They are very durable, a bit heavy, but lots of internal protection for the PS and the equipment they power.  Primary market is amateur radio.  Also field repairable.

 

http://www.astroncorp.com/

 

Tom



#9 halx

halx

    Vendor (DSO Planner)

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 1282
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2010
  • Loc: Albany, California, USA

Posted 14 February 2018 - 05:23 PM

Anyway... I didn't have this issue with other laptops, but I am now with the understanding that the higher power the computer, the more likely one is to experience this phenomena... and maybe there is some impact to other gear that sneaks into play unknowingly...

My point above exactly (but better put :) )



#10 Glutch

Glutch

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 101
  • Joined: 24 Mar 2016
  • Loc: North Richland Hills Texas

Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:30 PM

I am adding a Beelink computer to the mix and already have an imaging camera, guide camera, Powered USB hub and mount all powered off the battery.  Most of the work I do at the house with trips to the dark sky site when skies allow.  I use the battery in one of those sites but every other site has AC so thought instead of lugging the battery all over the place I would save the effort for long term stays or places without AC.

 

Why is a 100Ah battery not enough? Use it at night, charge from an AC source or DC (i.e. solar) you have daytime. That's the sanest solution with zero compromises (AC/DC is always a compromise).



#11 Daniel Guzas

Daniel Guzas

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 868
  • Joined: 20 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Bethlehem NH/ Boston MA

Posted 17 February 2018 - 01:03 AM

I’ve been using one of these for years... Any reason why you would go for a large power supply.. and expensive ones at that?

 

Am I running a risk powering my equipment with such an economical adapter/converter? Haven’t had any problems yet...

 

https://www.amazon.c...L70_&dpSrc=srch

 



#12 mclewis1

mclewis1

    Thread Killer

  • *****
  • Posts: 16687
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: New Brunswick, Canada

Posted 17 February 2018 - 08:18 AM

Daniel,  As long as your equipment doesn't need more than 5 amps you'll be just fine. That's a simple regulated switching style power supply designed to replace a lead acid battery when AC power is available. If your equipment starts to draw more than 5 amps you'll probably find the voltage starting to become a bit unstable (the regulation will suffer and the voltage will drop a bit). At over 5 amps you also run the risk of overheating components and having them fail.

 

It's also helpful to up size the size of a power supply (the amperage) when you start to get close to the original capacity. Running most power supplies at their full rated capability can sometimes shorten their lifespan. Running a power supply at 50 - 75% instead will usually keep them running cooler (and therefore longer lifespan) and it ensures that you have plenty of additional capacity should you need it when adding new gear and such.


Edited by mclewis1, 17 February 2018 - 08:18 AM.

  • Daniel Guzas and Glutch like this

#13 david-p

david-p

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 297
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2016
  • Loc: Vienna, Austria

Posted 17 February 2018 - 10:45 AM

It's also helpful to up size the size of a power supply (the amperage) when you start to get close to the original capacity. Running most power supplies at their full rated capability can sometimes shorten their lifespan. Running a power supply at 50 - 75% instead will usually keep them running cooler (and therefore longer lifespan) and it ensures that you have plenty of additional capacity should you need it when adding new gear and such.

At which point, you will be shortening the lifespan, because it will not be running at 50 - 75% anymore.

 

:) :) :)

 

David



#14 Daniel Guzas

Daniel Guzas

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 868
  • Joined: 20 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Bethlehem NH/ Boston MA

Posted 17 February 2018 - 09:00 PM

Daniel,  As long as your equipment doesn't need more than 5 amps you'll be just fine. That's a simple regulated switching style power supply designed to replace a lead acid battery when AC power is available. If your equipment starts to draw more than 5 amps you'll probably find the voltage starting to become a bit unstable (the regulation will suffer and the voltage will drop a bit). At over 5 amps you also run the risk of overheating components and having them fail.

 

It's also helpful to up size the size of a power supply (the amperage) when you start to get close to the original capacity. Running most power supplies at their full rated capability can sometimes shorten their lifespan. Running a power supply at 50 - 75% instead will usually keep them running cooler (and therefore longer lifespan) and it ensures that you have plenty of additional capacity should you need it when adding new gear and such.

 

Thank you for the reply... I’ll take the advice and see what my amperage draw is and make sure I’m not near the limit of the power supply. 



#15 Glutch

Glutch

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 101
  • Joined: 24 Mar 2016
  • Loc: North Richland Hills Texas

Posted 03 May 2018 - 12:14 PM

Just an FYI, I ended up purchasing the Celestron power supply for the mount and getting a 12v/10amp power supply to power everything else.  While in the field I will use the battery and solar for recharges.  The main reason for wanting the AC/DC power supply is to allow me quick setup and takedown while at the house where I have AC power. I'll take some photos and add them to this thread next week.


  • CounterWeight and halx like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: equipment



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics